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The power of humility

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The power of humility

  1. 1. THE POWER OF HUMILITY Leading With Humility
  2. 2. Why humility? • Jim Collin’s “Level 5 leaders” are humble, but iron willed, ambitious for the organization but not necessarily for themselves (Hayes & Comer, 2010, p.3) • Stone & Patterson’s (2005) research revealed that humility is one of the behaviors of the servant leader, which they describe as: “A humble means for affecting follower behavior.”
  3. 3. Humility through the ages Shedd says, “One of the most difficult challenges for any leader is to remain humble in light of the success that the leader has achieved.” Bill Gates said: “Success is a lousy teacher. It seduces people into thinking they cannot lose.” Shedd, D. (2011). David Shedd’s blog. Business Insider, April 1, 2011. Retrieved from http://www.businessinsider.com
  4. 4. Humility through the ages Marshall Goldsmith in What Got You Here Won’t Get You There, defines 21 stupid things that leaders need to stop doing now. The root cause of virtually all of these behaviors is the ego of the leader. 1. The ego that tells the leader that he knows everything and is always right. 2. The ego that tells the leader that she is better than the others who are subordinate. 3. The ego that tells the leaders that he does not need to play by the rules. Shedd, David (2011). David Shedd’s blog. Business Insider, April 1, 2011. Retrieved from http://www.businessinsider.com
  5. 5. Humility through the ages The question of humility has been a leadership issue through the ages: • Ancient China: “The great leader speaks little. He works without self-interest and leaves no trace. When all is finished, the people say: ‘we did it ourselves.’” ~ Lao Tzu Shedd, David (2011). David Shedd’s blog. Business Insider, April 1, 2011. Retrieved from http://www.businessinsider.com
  6. 6. Humility through the ages • Ancient Greece: The Ancient Greeks had a word for the loss of humility and the triumph of the ego: hubris. Hubris is the outrageous arrogance where a person in power overestimates his or her own competence and capabilities, gradually loses touch with reality and (in Greek tragedies) succumbs to a tragic fall. Shedd, David (2011). David Shedd’s blog. Business Insider, April 1, 2011. Retrieved from http://www.businessinsider.com
  7. 7. Humility through the ages • Ancient Rome: “To conquer one’s spirit, abandon anger, and be modest in victory . . . Whoever can do this I compare not to the greatest of men but to a god.” ~Cicero Shedd, David (2011). David Shedd’s blog. Business Insider, April 1, 2011. Retrieved from http://www.businessinsider.com
  8. 8. Humility through the ages • Mongol World around 1200: “The key to leadership is self-control: primarily, the mastery of pride, which is more difficult to subdue than a wild lion.” ~Genghis Khan Shedd, David (2011). David Shedd’s blog. Business Insider, April 1, 2011. Retrieved from http://www.businessinsider.com
  9. 9. Humility through the ages • Louis XIV France: “Louis’s greatest gift was to maintain his quality of common sense in the midst of constant flattery. Throughout, the king demanded respect and obedience, not flattery.” ~Louis XIV biographer, Olivier Bernier Shedd, David (2011). David Shedd’s blog. Business Insider, April 1, 2011. Retrieved from http://www.businessinsider.com
  10. 10. Humility through the ages • 18th Century Austria: To keep herself humble and ensure that she did what was right and best for Austria-Hungarian Empire, the Archduchess Maria Teresa employed one advisor as her official critic. It was the formal job of Emmanuel Count Sylva-Tarouca to tell Maria Teresa all of her mistakes. Shedd, David (2011). David Shedd’s blog. Business Insider, April 1, 2011. Retrieved from http://www.businessinsider.com
  11. 11. Humility through the ages • 20th Century America: “To possess self- confidence and humility at the same time is called maturity.” ~Jack Welch Shedd, David (2011). David Shedd’s blog. Business Insider, April 1, 2011. Retrieved from http://www.businessinsider.com
  12. 12. Humility through the ages Conclusion: As a leader, your success comes about from the success of others. Maintaining humility allows you to better keep your focus where it needs to be, directed outwards towards your team and your customers. Shedd, David (2011). David Shedd’s blog. Business Insider, April 1, 2011. Retrieved from http://www.businessinsider.com
  13. 13. Humility through the ages Ken Blanchard “People with humility do not think less of themselves; they just think about themselves less.” Shedd, David (2011). David Shedd’s blog. Business Insider, April 1, 2011. Retrieved from http://www.businessinsider.com
  14. 14. Leadership Quality: Humility Kenneth Boa in “Leadership Qualities: Humility” It’s humbling to recognize that God is more responsible for the achievements of our lives than we are, that we are people who have been given our abilities, time and opportunities. These things are not our possession; they are gifts from God and we will ultimately give an account for what we do with what we have been given.
  15. 15. Jim Collins The most powerfully transformative executives possess a paradoxical mixture of personal humility and professional will. They are timid and ferocious. Shy and fearless. They are rare—and unstoppable. Collins, Jim (2001, Jan.). Level 5 leadership: The triumph of humility and fierce resolve. Harvard Business Review (Reprint).
  16. 16. Jim Collins The Yin and Yang of Level 5 Leadership PERSONAL HUMILITY PROFESSIONAL WILL Demonstrates a compelling modesty, shunning public adulation; never boastful. Creates superb results, a clear catalyst in transition from good to great. Acts with quiet, calm determination; relies principally on inspired standards not inspiring charisma, to motivate. Demonstrates unwavering resolve to do whatever must be done to produce the best long-term results, no matter how difficult. Channels ambition into company, not the self; sets up successors for even more greatness in the next generation. Sets the standard of building an enduring great company; will settle for nothing less. Looks in the mirror, not out the window, to apportion responsibility for poor results, never blaming other people, External factors or bad luck. Looks out the window, not in the mirror, to apportion credit for success of the company—to other people, external factors, and good luck. Collins, Jim (2001, Jan.). Level 5 leadership: The triumph of humility and fierce resolve. Harvard Business Review (Reprint).
  17. 17. The Payoff of Humble Leadership Armour lists the following 8 dividends of humble leadership: 1. Humility lets us dismiss concerns about being the center of attention, so that we can step aside and let others shine. People don’t tent to trust people who insist on taking all the credit or hogging the spotlight. Armour, Mike (2007). Humility an leadership: No laughing matter. LeaderPerfect Newsletter, Aug. 15, 2007. Retrieved from http://leaderperfect.com/newsletter
  18. 18. The Payoff of Humble Leadership 2. Humility leaves us open to what others can teach us, no matter what their station in life. As a result we learn and develop wisdom more quickly, because we let everyone be our mentor. Armour, M. (2007). Humility an leadership: No laughing matter. LeaderPerfect Newsletter, Aug. 15, 2007. Retrieved from http://leaderperfect.com/newsletter
  19. 19. The Payoff of Humble Leadership 3. Humility lets us treat even difficult people with such respect that we help them feel worthwhile. People do not typically invest their trust in someone who makes them feel invisible or insignificant. Armour, M. (2007). Humility an leadership: No laughing matter. LeaderPerfect Newsletter, Aug. 15, 2007. Retrieved from http://leaderperfect.com/newsletter
  20. 20. The Payoff of Humble Leadership 4. Humility preserves a spirit of gratitude. A spirit of gratitude does more than perhaps any other character trait to keep our outlook on life positive and healthy. Sensing this, people are unlikely to put great trust in a leader who is ungrateful, for (unconsciously, at least) they realize that ingratitude is a sign of other character flaws. Armour, Mike (2007). Humility an leadership: No laughing matter. LeaderPerfect Newsletter, Aug. 15, 2007. Retrieved from http://leaderperfect.com/newsletter
  21. 21. The Payoff of Humble Leadership 5. Humility allows us to confront our own failings and take valuable lessons from them. Nothing is more harmful to trust than a leader who lives in denial or who never learns from things done poorly. Armour, Mike (2007). Humility an leadership: No laughing matter. LeaderPerfect Newsletter, Aug. 15, 2007. Retrieved from http://leaderperfect.com/newsletter
  22. 22. The Payoff of Humble Leadership 6. Humility allows us to be more patient with those who are still learning and thus prone to mistakes. We see in them a reflection of our own need to learn and improve. Appropriate patience is critical in building trust, for impatience breeds anxiety and even fear among those we lead, the very antithesis of trust. Armour, Mike (2007). Humility an leadership: No laughing matter. LeaderPerfect Newsletter, Aug. 15, 2007. Retrieved from http://leaderperfect.com/newsletter
  23. 23. The Payoff of Humble Leadership 7. Humility makes us approachable and receptive to being held accountable. Leaders who hold others accountable must be open and willing to be held accountable themselves. Otherwise, a double standard is at work that is inimical to trust. Armour, Mike (2007). Humility an leadership: No laughing matter. LeaderPerfect Newsletter, Aug. 15, 2007. Retrieved from http://leaderperfect.com/newsletter
  24. 24. The Payoff of Humble Leadership 8. Humility keeps our curiosity alive. Aware of how much we don’t know, recognizing that we have our own pattern of blind spots, we are eager to explore and learn. After all, people don’t normally trust “know-it-alls.” Armour, Mike (2007). Humility an leadership: No laughing matter. LeaderPerfect Newsletter, Aug. 15, 2007. Retrieved from http://leaderperfect.com/newsletter
  25. 25. Start With Humility What Humility Is… • Humanness • Vulnerability • Ability to keep one’s accomplishments in perspective • The soil that grows effective leaders What Humility Is Not… • Not weakness • Not lack of confidence • Not low self-esteem • Not absence of ego • Not a lack of assertiveness, ambition, or speaking out
  26. 26. The Humility Dynamic Humanness/ Authenticity Humble Behavior Trust and Respect Inspired Followers+ =Results in
  27. 27. Biblical Humility and Leadership 1 Kings 21:27-29, NKJV 27 So it was, when Ahab heard those words, that he tore his clothes and put sackcloth on his body, and fasted and lay in sackcloth, and went about mourning. 28 And the word of the LORD came to Elijah the Tishbite, saying, 29 "See how Ahab has humbled himself before Me? Because he has humbled himself before Me, I will not bring the calamity in his days. In the days of his son I will bring the calamity on his house."
  28. 28. Pride Vs Humility Prov 29:23, NKJV 23 A man's pride will bring him low, But the humble in spirit will retain honor.
  29. 29. Pride and Humility James 4:6, NKJV 6 …"God resists the proud, but gives grace to the humble.“ James 4:10 10 Humble yourselves in the sight of the Lord, and He will lift you up.

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