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Managing Your Personal Brand, Optimizing LinkedIn and Interviewing Successfully

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Managing Your Personal Brand, Optimizing LinkedIn and Interviewing Successfully

Presentation for women returning to the workforce on how to develop and navigate your personal brand. Includes personal branding exercises to develop a compelling and memorable personal brand; comprehensive LinkedIn profile strategies; social media profile tips; tips for interviewing success.

Presentation for women returning to the workforce on how to develop and navigate your personal brand. Includes personal branding exercises to develop a compelling and memorable personal brand; comprehensive LinkedIn profile strategies; social media profile tips; tips for interviewing success.

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Managing Your Personal Brand, Optimizing LinkedIn and Interviewing Successfully

  1. 1. Managing Your Personal Brand LinkedIn Profiles & Social Media Tips Interviewing Success Strategies Wednesday, February 11, 2015 presented by Robin Frank for Talent Reconnect
  2. 2. Yours Truly Social Media I work with companies large and small to help them build and tune-up an engaging online presence. I’m known as a dynamic speaker and speak regularly at national conferences, companies, and events. Personal Branding I help individuals in many fields create powerful personal brands. My personal branding strategy is featured in the recent book “Digital Marketing” written by Larry Weber and endorsed by Reid Hoffman (Chairman, Founder/LinkedIn) and John Donahoe (CEO/eBay). Reboot Camp Innovative program to help Moms confidently re-enter the workforce after a break. Six inspiring and pragmatic sessions cover topics from networking and interview skills to social media and personal branding, plus two hours of one-on-one coaching. Mom Twin 8 Yr old boys Live in Mill Valley
  3. 3. “Instead of creating life, I’ve decided to just establish an online persona.”
  4. 4. No Shortage of Guides on Personal Branding
  5. 5. BUT…No One Connects the Dots • Branding • Psychology • Social Media/LinkedIn • Networking • Online Marketing • Content Strategy
  6. 6. Today’s Presentation • Personal Branding • Social Media and LinkedIn • Telling your Story • Interviewing Tips
  7. 7. Let’s Dive In!
  8. 8. Developing Your Brand Will Help • Your interview • Your online presence • Networking • Finding partnerships • Building relationships
  9. 9. Transparency is Sexy • Your brand is your character in action ▫ Not a slogan/ad campaign, but a living thing ▫ Driving force - what you stand for, what sets you apart • Tell people clearly and memorably what you do ▫ So they can spread the word • Get clear on your attributes ▫ Not contriving an image you think will be accepted ▫ Which are vital to your success? What do you offer the world? ▫ You will always be too much of something for someone
  10. 10. The High Cost of Being Forgotten • The best opportunities come when a friend refers you to another friend: Word Of Mouth • How do you make it easy for people to remember you? • How do you not blend in?
  11. 11. Yup - You Are Being Googled YOU
  12. 12. What Makes a Personal Brand Compelling? WHO YOU ARE Short mantra – what you want the listener to remember most about you WHAT Tag line – how you add value + your unique benefits, how what you do is different WHY Passion - why you do what you do GOAL What you want – customized for different audiences so the listener knows what you are asking
  13. 13. Who: The Art of Pitchcraft • Whether you are trying to raise capital, promote your company, or promote yourself – an Elevator Pitch is essential
  14. 14. What: A Great Pitch Includes a Powerful Brand Mantra • Quick, punchy, memorable statement ▫ Communicate your message clearly to someone who doesn’t know you • Practice & Planning ▫ Deliver it on the spot under pressure • One minute to say it all
  15. 15. What • How do you add value? • What are your distinctive benefits? • How is what you do different from what others like you do – brand value proposition • “I help people imagine and create their brand online quickly and efficiently.”
  16. 16. Why: Get at the Passion Behind What You Do •Psychology - People don’t buy what you do; they buy WHY you do it ▫The WHY talks to an area of the brain that controls behavior and decision-making ▫Your enthusiasm shines through - people biologically more apt to agree with you •Example: Apple (Simon Sinek)  We make great computers –they are beautifully designed, perform well and are easy to use, want to buy one?  Everything we do, we believe in challenging the status quo, thinking differently. The way we do this is by making products that are beautifully designed, simple to use, and user-friendly, and they happen to be great computers -want to buy one?
  17. 17. The WHY is Powerful • What grabs people’s attention and makes us memorable is not what we do, but why we do it • Why you do what you do - this reflects your passion • Most people skip their why – they see it as less significant • This is where our personal values, our vision, and our enthusiasm comes through
  18. 18. Goals • What do you want? • What are you trying to accomplish? • This determines how and where to focus your personal branding efforts including what type of a digital presence makes sense
  19. 19. The Royal We • WHO: I am a navigator – I help people find their way • WHAT: I help people imagine and create their brand online quickly and efficiently • WHY: I love helping small businesses and entrepreneurs create a compelling persona that conveys their passion and expertise – getting them where they want to go personally and professionally • GOAL: I’m looking for 1-2 more clients. Do you know anyone who who would benefit from with me to get to the next step in their career or business?
  20. 20. Break Up Into Groups of Two • Create your brand statement • Interview each other • What do you do? Who do you serve? How do you do it? Why do you do it? • Tell stories, say things you wouldn’t ordinarily say, find out where you flow and feel inspired • See if you can create one Zinger line • Edit each other’s • We will regroup and share several
  21. 21. Your Presence is How People Form Their Impressions of You • Your brand should be consistent both online and offline, manifesting itself in how you answer your phone, introduce yourself, what you retweet, and even the community organizations with which you engage • It’s all about packaging - it must be authentic and it should ring true to who you are and how you live
  22. 22. Master Your Universe • Own YOU.com ▫ Make it professional ▫ Wordpress/Divi • Google Alerts ▫ Know what is being said about you • Google Search ▫ Aim to control the first full page of Google search results (pictures too) • Engage in social networks ▫ Smartly, strategically
  23. 23. Choose Your Platform
  24. 24. Social Media Tips
  25. 25. LinkedIn is Networking Nirvana
  26. 26. Just How Important is Your LinkedIn Profile?
  27. 27. • Update your profile ▫ Keeps you top of mind with your friends and connections ▫ Particularly if you post updates as well It’s a No-Brainer
  28. 28. Customize Your Profile URL • While on your LinkedIn profile page, your URL has some strange characters and looks funny - this is not the URL you want to share • Click the Edit icon next to the URL link under your profile photo • First come/first serve • Use it below your email signature, blog, business card, etc.
  29. 29. Use a Good Image • Your photo sends a strong message of who you are • Use a head shot with a clean background, a smile and a clear view of your eyes • Best photo is a smiling face and a little bit of your shoulders • Make sure it isn’t blurry, or grainy
  30. 30. Optimize/Sass up your headline • Most people only look at your picture and headline • Craft a compelling headline, even if you are not employed • You have 120 characters to play with – maximize it ▫ Keywords used by ideal clients to search for what you offer  Create a word cloud of your job description  3 keywords that represent your job history and ideal job ▫ Use "Show examples" and "See what others in your industry are using" • Watch “Who’s viewed my profile” to see if changes have an impact on views
  31. 31. Skills/expertise • Others endorse you for skills - and it shows up below your work experience on your profile • You can add, remove,and reorganize skills
  32. 32. Beef up your summary section • Contact info first • Use first tense - I was…. • 3-5 paragraphs - bullets in the middle • Walk through your work passions, key skills, unique qualifications, and industries • Template ▫ What you do - what problem do you solve and how?  How you are different?  Why you do what you do?  How did you get where you are today? Explain concisely in a way that makes you look interesting and motivated.  What do others say - credibility • End with a call to action
  33. 33. Don’t Just Say It, Display It • Portfolio feature - you can add photos, videos, documents, linked articles with images, screenshots, audio recordings, and SlideShare presentations • Highlight work samples, client work, launches, special projects, press, and tweets from speaking engagements. • Not many are using this yet
  34. 34. 90% of information transmitted to the brain is visual, and visuals are processed 60,000X faster in the brain than text
  35. 35. Volunteering Can Be Just as Powerful as Work Experience • Include organizations support and projects you have worked on as well
  36. 36. recommendations • 10x increase your ranking • Add a personal message when you ask for a recommendation • Be strategic - your recs should emphasize different talents and aspects of your skills • You can choose to hide/display any recommendation Recommendations
  37. 37. Be Strategic About Recommendations • Look at jobs you want - map your skills to those required by the job and strategize • Which of your managers can speak to each skill? • Ask each person to discuss three skills - and provide those • Ask them to include: How long they’ve worked with you, background on how they know you, description of the three skills you asked them to discuss, and at least one specific success example • Offer to write it for their review • Find people similar to you and look for recommendations you find compelling
  38. 38. Own Your Gap Time with Strength • Be professional, proud and - you weren’t “just” raising kids or “just” volunteering • Brush up on interviewing and resume skills - increase confidence • Find things you have done in your gap time that add to your skills • Rewrite negative self talk (3 replacement statements) • “If you change the way you look at things, the things you look at change.” - Wayne Dyer • Focus on positive experiences - Hardwiring Happiness
  39. 39. Talking About the Gap • It is OK to have a gap • What matters is how you explain it in your resume, cover letter and interview • Talk about your time off - what did you oversee or coordinate - make it useful in some way • “I have been a stay at home mom for the past X years. During that time, I have been volunteering at a local food bank where I’ve overseen and coordinated several food drives • It was during that time I realized my passion for…. • I’ve been taking courses in …….” • Be concise - don’t give too much detail
  40. 40. Moms Make Desirable Employees • Experience, maturity and perspective • Resourceful and solutions oriented • Excellent time management skills • Adept people managers - with finely honed communication skills • Eager to get back to work
  41. 41. Be Positive and Enthusiastic • “Thats why I am excited to work for your company” • The most crucial message to deliver is how you are ready to return to work • Your enthusiasm can be one of the aspects that sets you aside from everyone else
  42. 42. The Intersection of Social Media and Your Job Search • Make Facebook private and accessible to your friends only • Update LinkedIn • Pinterest and Instagram - show your personality but watch what you post, your hashtags, and how the accounts are linked
  43. 43. Engage Social Media to Show Your Interest • Use Twitter, Tumblr, LinkedIn, Pinterest, Instagram — whatever medium suits you best — to show that you are thinking about the industry and returning to work
  44. 44. Communicate Your Childcare Game Plan• Some employers have concerns that childcare could cause absences • Reassure your prospective employer that you have childcare worked out, including a backup plan
  45. 45. Interviewing - Brush Up on Tips for Success
  46. 46. Inside the Head of Your Interviewer 1. Have you got the skills, expertise and experience to perform the job? 2. Are you enthusiastic and interested in the job and the company? 3. Will you fit into the team, culture and company?
  47. 47. Map Your Skills and Experience to the Job • Look at the skills and experience required for the job • Map your skills and experience to those required • Prepare concrete examples of your skills in action and have these memorized so you can draw on them during the interview
  48. 48. Stand Out From the Crowd • Practice • Your story - for re-entering the workforce and why you are interested in this job • Your personal brand pitch • Your answer to the “Tell Me About Yourself” question
  49. 49. Backup Your Enthusiasm with Research • Of course you want the interviewer to know you can’t wait to join the company…BUT… • Nothing conveys this better than a demonstrated understanding of the company, its strategy, current performance, structure, market position and products
  50. 50. Your Bonus Homework • Google • Read the company's "FAQ" or "About Us" section • You will be reading the same things as other candidates • Also check out • 10-K filing for strengths and weaknesses which will inform what value you can bring • Annual Report - company direction/goals so you can align your answers • Press Releases - company image • Competitors - demonstrate you know them
  51. 51. Prepare Questions for the Interviewer • Prepare in advance based on your research • Pay attention throughout the interview, so you'll have questions related to what the hiring manager talked about
  52. 52. 10 Thoughtful Questions to Ask 1. What’s the most important goal the person in this role needs to accomplish in order to be successful? 2. What are the immediate priorities? 3. How will this skill be used on the job? 4. How will performance be measured? 5. Can you walk me through the organization chart? 6. What is the manager’s vision for the department and this role? 7. What is your/the manager’s leadership style? 8. How are decisions made at the company? What’s the appetite for change? What’s are the politics/the intensity/the sophistication of the infrastructure? 9. How do you plan to deal with x? 10.What are some things your competitors are doing right that you need to copy?
  53. 53. 2 Minute Exercises to Calm You • You think you are calm but then your body gets nervous • Palms over eyes • Relaxes and relieves eye strain • Longer exhales • Relaxes and calms the sympathetic nervous system (fight & flight)
  54. 54. 7 Seconds to Make a First Impression
  55. 55. Wear the Right Outfit • Make sure you know what the dress code is for the office • Depends on industry, geographic location and time of year • Pinterest board: pinterest.com/robeen/interv iew-outfits/
  56. 56. Use Positive Body Language • Sit still, don’t fidget, good posture, arms open • Talk slowly, breathe deeply, smile • Enjoy yourself and make eye contact
  57. 57. Power Posing - Amy Cuddy • Your body language shapes who you are • Social psychologist - Amy Cuddy TED talk • Standing (or sitting) in a posture of confidence, even when we don’t feel confident — can affect testosterone and cortisol levels in the brain, and may have an impact on our success • Fake it until you become it
  58. 58. Show You Fit In • Companies have different cultures, ways of behaving and working • Check Glassdoor - information about what it is like to work for different companies • Map the culture of the company to your personality traits, style and behaviors and use it to answer questions: • How would you describe your work style? • How would your colleagues describe you? • What makes you fit into our company? • What makes you a good team member?
  59. 59. Build Rapport with Your Interviewer • Use LinkedIn, Google, and social profiles to get a fuller picture of the person • Try to find a point of mutual connection • More points of connection = stronger bonds
  60. 60. Give the Right Answer to the Weakness Question • Don’t give a cop-out answer • Be honest and give a real answer -something you’ve struggle with in a particular situation • Avoid deal breakers • Talk about your proactive attempts to overcome
  61. 61. If You Don’t Know the Answer • The interviewer just threw you a big curveball or asked you something and you draw a blank • Don’t. Freak. Out. • Don’t say I don’t know • Don’t make stuff up • Ask questions • Talk about how you would find the answer
  62. 62. Everyone is Busy • Demonstrate that you can hit the ground running, will have a minimal learning curve and help them solve their immediate problems • State this at the end of your interview and reiterate it in your thank you note
  63. 63. The Interview is NOT Over Until You Walk Out the Door • Pay attention to your words and behavior as you leave • Be polite and on top of your game when you are making casual conversation on your way out, and be nice to the receptionist
  64. 64. Ask About Next Steps Before You Leave • When will you hear about their decision? • Then follow up - while it may not influence the outcome, it shows persistence and attention to detail
  65. 65. Your Personal Brand is a Big Deal • Create a memorable and compelling personal brand, and keep it consistent across your emails, resume, phone calls, social profiles, networking and interviews • Manage your personal brand throughout your career
  66. 66. Thank You! robeenf@gmail.com linkedin.com/in/robinfrank robeenf.com GoRebootCamp.com slideshare.net/robeen pinterest.com/robeen
  67. 67. • Lie: Never, ever lie. Being found out will ruin your chances of getting the job. Plus if you make up something, you may not be able to talk at length about it without slipping up. Generally speaking, honesty is the best policy! Here are some of the common lies you need to avoid.
  68. 68. You Are Going Back to Work Because You Want to Work • Do not Talk about your problems: You need the job to pay off your student loans, blah blah. The hiring manager does not want to hear about your 99 problems, and although you're being honest, it can come off as a pity party. You will be hired based on your qualifications, potential for success, and your fit with the culture. Everything else will be secondary to those factors.
  69. 69. Getting a Job is 60% Networking • 20% - Applying directly to a job • 20% - Great resume, online brand, LinkedIn, social • 60% - Networking
  70. 70. Networking: Quality not Quantity • Deepen your connection ▫ People you have just met or may have known your whole life ▫ People in our networks serve a variety of purposes – they can stimulate our thinking, expand our options, help us make better decisions, provide insight into our careers • Be a people hub ▫ One of the most valuable things you can do for someone is connect them with the right person ▫ Facilitate a mutually beneficial connection
  71. 71. Be Strategic: The direction of your network is in your hands
  72. 72. Weak Links are More Powerful • Account for most of the structure of social networks in society as well as the transmission of information through these networks • More novel information flows to individuals through weak rather than strong ties • Our close friends tend to move in the same circles that we do – and the information they receive overlaps considerably with what we already know
  73. 73. Network is a Verb Not a Noun • Care and feeding of your network ▫ Give something of value in every interaction ▫ Send a message with an update or article or interesting event
  74. 74. Why Don’t We Follow Up? • You’re one connection away from getting the job of your dreams • Sometimes you MEET that one connection. You know it’s right for you. And you know it’s right for them. But for some reason, you NEVER follow up. Why? ▫ We forget ▫ Negative thoughts prevent you from taking action ▫ Networking can feel forced, unnatural, and sleazy
  75. 75. The Key to the Successful Follow-Up • Calendar reminder 5-10 days away - email • How to make sure they read it? ▫ Say: I’ll email you in a week or two  Email content: offer a potential solution, data, research you think they would be interested in and/or ask a question that demonstrates some knowledge - Are you going to XYZ event or do you think competitor ABC's new launch/positioning will be impactful?
  76. 76. Getting Referrals and Introductions • Increase your chances of being interviewed and getting a better job by 5-10X over applying directly • Some connections you make along the way will surprise you, and put you on a path you never even considered
  77. 77. Be likeable and personable. This statement needs no explanation, but you might want to read Dale Carnegie’s classic How to Win Friends and Influence People for some tips, if you haven’t already done so. If the hiring manager and team like you, it won’t matter so much if you mess up or make a mistake due to the halo effect.
  78. 78. Networking Forwards with LinkedIn • Target 10 people who can vouch for your past performance and future potential (goal is 4) ▫ Professors, advisors, or social connections • Reach out - ask if they would be comfortable recommending you to connections in companies or industries of interest to you ▫ Get the names of 4 people and an intro ▫ Look at their LinkedIn - have specific people in mind ▫ Track everything in a spreadsheet
  79. 79. LinkedIn Introductions - Trusted Connections • Look at a job/company you are interested in • Find who you're connected to (1st Degree) who knows someone in the company (2nd Degree) and ask to be referred/introduced
  80. 80. Networking Backwards – How to Find Your Ideal Contact
  81. 81. InMail – When You Have No Connections • You can send an inMail to anyone • For pay (avoids spam) • If you don’t receive a reply, LinkedIn will refund your credit automatically
  82. 82. Talking to Strangers • Lead with something in common ▫ Contextualize the conversation - mention how you found them • Get to your point fast • Reassure the person that you’re not asking for a favor ▫ Be firm that you are just looking for a meeting • Talk about what makes you qualified - your brand pitch here! • End with a strong call to action with a time limit ▫ Mention that you need only 15 minutes of their time. • Be respectful = Show appreciation for their time
  83. 83. The (Almost)Perfect Meeting Request Dear [name], I found your profile through the [name the common LinkedIn Group or network] on LinkedIn. I have been working as a [name last position] at [name last company], and I am in the process of making a career transition. It would be helpful for me to find out about your experiences as a [name role] for [target company]. I promise not to take more than 15 minutes of your time. I am not expecting to discuss a particular job opening, but I would appreciate being able to talk with you on an informational basis. What is the best way to reach you this week? Do you have any availability this coming Thursday or Friday? I thank you in advance. Regards, [your name]
  84. 84. 8. Get social — develop or clean up your online presence. It’s key to getting a job these days and should represent the best of you. Tweeting and blogging are a great force-function for something else you should do, which is to refresh yourself on what’s happening in your industry. Read everything you can get you eyes on. 9. Know the tech trends. Are you familiar with Asana, Slideshare, Vine, Google Docs/Drive, how companies are using social media to manage customer service real time, the shift to mobile
  85. 85. Change the Game • Offer value before you ask for anything ▫ How can I help this person? ▫ Do not discount yourself just because you’re young. Offer what you have based on what people need ▫ Add value - Offer to create a website, a video, or? • Do your research ▫ Know the basics - take time to check Google, Twitter, LinkedIn, Facebook, etc. so you understand what the person is all about ▫ Find the details - look for common hobbies or a hook - one of my mentors is someone I connected with because I reached out and mentioned we both like to dive
  86. 86. • Own your time off with confidence • Brush up on interviewing and resume skills • Professional LI profile • Find things you have done that add to your skills
  87. 87. • A. • Is ageism out there? Yes. However, you must filter out your ageism-related concerns or you will feel defeated before you even walk out the door. • Make sure to tell everyone you know that you are looking to return to work and that you have a new master’s degree and expertise in subject X. Applying online will not yield results as you are likely to get screened out. Your success is going to be highly dependent on a personal handoff from someone who knows you. That person needs to tell a friend or colleague who is hiring that you were a star when you worked together and she just has to talk to you. Or the person who knows the interviewer needs to hear from a mutual contact who knows you well about how great you are so she can tell him that you should be considered. LinkedIn is very helpful in showing such connections. • Don’t forget people who might have reported to you, whom you mentored or whom you knew in a prior job. We have numerous stories of returning professionals who were hired to work for someone who used to work for them (including Carol). They know and respect you and can sometimes open a door for you. • Carol Fishman Cohen talks about the importance of asking people you may have once mentored to open a door for you. • Every employer we work with tells us that an internal employee reference moves the résumé to the top of the pile. Some employers even compensate employees who recommend people who are hired. When you meet practitioners in your field, demonstrate your knowledge of the latest thinking in the field from your recent academic work. Don’t be afraid to show enthusiasm, excitement and knowledge. That energy will help counteract ageist perceptions. If you know who you will be meeting — say a panelist at a professional association event — and the person has published work on the topic or has a special research interest in it, review their work ahead of time and tell them your reaction to it. Even better, try to identify this work via Twitter, Facebook or YouTube, and mention: “I was on your company’s Twitter page and saw the post about your new report. I clicked through and read it, and I was particularly drawn to point Y. I was wondering what you thought about Big-Guru-in-the-Field Z’s thinking on that point.” Indicating in this subtle way that you are comfortable with social media will help reduce age-related concerns. 96
  88. 88. • S from Iowa: How do I highlight the skills I have gained in my previous positions to do something else. I worked in nonprofit fund development for a long time, but I don’t want to do that anymore. I have experience in marketing, communications, bookkeeping, etc. • A. • First, you have to figure out what you want to do. Let’s say you decide to pursue a communications role at a for-profit company in a related industry to the nonprofit you were in previously. Make sure you add a summary at the top of your résumé, citing your communications skills and explaining the transition you wish to make. In particular, you might want to list the most important transferable skills, such as social media savvy or understanding of a market segment or whatever the relevant buzzwords are for the jobs for which you are applying. Use the same keywords in your résumé that are used in a particular job posting and customize your résumé for each job posting. In your LinkedIn profile, describe yourself as a communications professional, not as a nonprofit development executive. 97
  89. 89. • we recommend pursuing volunteer roles that are in line with your career goals. Some sources for such roles include www.idealist.org, www.volunteermatch.org and www.catchafire.org. 98
  90. 90. • What’s your game plan to ensure success in the job?” because it quickly reveals the proactive candidates – the ones who have thought through what it will take to be effective in the role. Not having a well thought out answer to this question is a quick way to get eliminated from the hiring process. • The easiest way to ensure you’re ready to answer the “What’s your game plan?” question during job interviews is to prepare your answer ahead of time. Sit down and re-read the job posting. Then, based on the job description and requirements, brainstorm what you believe it will take to be successful in the job. • For example, let’s pretend you have a job interview for a position as a pharmaceutical sales representative. Think about what you would need to do or learn within the first 90 days on the job to ensure your successful. You’ll want your customers to see you as knowledgeable and be able to earn their trust – that means you’ll need to know everything possible about the products you’ll be representing. You’ll also want to quickly learn your sales territory and all your customers as well as learn the computer systems you’ll be using in your job. • As you go through the process of determining your game plan for the position in which you’ll be interviewing, follow these tips: • 1. Ask yourself: “What will it take for me to be successful?” • 2. Re-read the job description with the list of job requirements and skills/experience necessary. • 3. Brainstorm a list of items and put these items into a one-page “Game Plan” document with a brief explanation of each item. • Using the pharmaceutical sales rep example, your game plan for success might look like this: • • Products: Learn everything there is to know about the products I’ll be representing. • • Terminology: Learn all the appropriate medical terminology that customers will use during our discussions. Obtain recommendations from my manager on the best ways to gain this knowledge, be it on the job, through reading articles, attending seminars, memorizing terminology and definitions, etc. • • Sales territory: Learn my sales territory as well as background information about all of my customers within my territory. • • Sales techniques: Learn sales techniques from one of the top company 99
  91. 91. • Job Seekers: Don't Forget To Prepare Questions For The Employer • The job interview I was conducting had been going well. The candidate, “Eric” (name changed), was intelligent, articulate, experienced, and met the majority of the job requirements. Near the end of the interview I paused. “Now that I’ve spent the last 45 minutes asking you questions, do you have any questions for me?” I asked. • The candidate stared at me with a look of sheer terror on his face. He looked down at his feet and then over at the clock on the conference room wall. I could see that he was frantically trying to come up with a question as he squirmed in his chair. Finally, he mumbled, “Um, no, not really.” An awkward silence followed. • Believe it or not, that situation is as awkward for interviewers as it is for job seekers. As a hiring manager, I specifically look for candidates who have done their homework and come prepared with questions (based on their research of the job, the company, and the industry) – so they can also evaluate whether or not the position will be a good fit for them. • It’s important to prepare questions ahead of time so when the hiring manager asks, “Do you have any questions for me?” you’ll have a list from which to pull. That way, you won’t have to worry about your mind going blank (like “Eric”) at that crucial moment. • As you prepare for your job interview, try brainstorming some questions based on the following categories: Hiring manager, job, department, and company. Here are some example questions, so you’ll understand what I mean: • Potential questions for the hiring manager: • • How would you describe your leadership style? • • What are the reasons you decided to work for this company? • • What do you like the most and the least about working here? • Potential questions about the job: • • Is this a newly created position or was there someone previously in it? • • If someone was in it, what did that person move on to do? • • What are the most common attributes of the employees who are the most successful in this position? • Potential questions about the department: • • How many people work in this department? 100
  92. 92. • Job Seekers: Treat Telephone Interviews Like In-Person Interviews • Comment Now Follow Comments • Some of the worst interviews I’ve experienced as a hiring manager were telephone interviews. I once had a job seeker “Daniel” (name changed) take my telephone interview while he was driving in his car. • I could hear everything, from the traffic noise to ambulance sirens to Daniel stopping at a service station and filling his car with gas. The candidate could have simply sat inside his parked car for the telephone interview. Instead, he wrongly assumed I wouldn’t notice that he took the call while he was driving. • Unfortunately, what this behavior projected to me was that the job was less important to him than driving in his car and filling it with gas. His lackadaisical attitude could also be seen in the way he answered many of my questions, which provided further confirmation of his questionable character. As you’re probably guessing, he didn’t get the job. • For many jobs, you must first get through a telephone interview before you’re invited to an in- person interview, so don’t discount the importance of it. Here are tips to ace telephone interviews: • Act like it’s an in-person interview. Research the company and industry, prepare potential interview questions and answers, and practice interviewing over the telephone with someone so you can get the feel for it before the actual interview. • Test your telephone voice. Practice how you speak over the telephone so you’ll come across sounding clear and at the right volume. Introduce yourself at the beginning using a strong voice that sounds confident and avoid answers that ramble or sound monotone. Feeling a little lethargic? Try standing up when you talk to help you sound more energetic. • Eliminate background noise. Ensure you can hold the interview in a quiet location. If you’re interviewing from your home, be sure no one will pick up one of the other telephones and 101
  93. 93. • Struggling to decide on an outfit for your upcoming job interview? What you wear to an interview creates an image or perception of the type of person you are, so choosing your attire is critical to presenting yourself as the right candidate to hire. • How interview attire has shifted • The dot-com era ushered in a more casual approach to workplace attire, including during interviews, in the past 10-15 years. When the economic recession hit, job seekers began dressing up as a way to differentiate themselves from other candidates. The recession created a heightened awareness by hiring managers of what candidates wear to interviews. Interview attire is also often seen as a test of a candidate’s familiarity of the company and industry. • Tips to dress for positive impact • • The appropriate interview attire depends on the industry in which you’ll be interviewing, as well as the geographic location and time of year. • • Spend time on the Internet researching the company, industry and competitors to determine suitable interview outfits. • • Still not sure? Call the company’s HR department and ask what they recommend you wear. • • When in doubt, err on the side of being slightly over dressed, rather than show up looking too casual. • • Don’t have an appropriate outfit? Go to a large department store like Nordstrom or Macy’s and ask for help from a personal shopper or hire a personal stylist. • • Ensure that your clothes are cleaned and pressed. • • Avoid wearing perfume or cologne. • • Wear makeup and jewelry that are appropriate to the job/company/industry. • <div style="position:absolute;border:0;margin:0;padding:0;left:0px;top:0px"> <a href="http://pr.ybp.yahoo.com/cj/cd/F_nDuAR9c5SO8Nw-_O-alfSdR3- CkgbgUg_mkCw0svbHH01rsw1D59AUwOw6HjVY3fbH1EwLOQXCrZZp-Z-n4A/rurl/https://royale- ssl.spongecell.com/api/ad_tags/51273869/clickthrough?creative_id=315838&noflash=true&nos cript=true&external_placement_id=Tempe_Tourism_300x2_3&external_site_id=SPONGECELL_S 102
  94. 94. • Tip #1: Come prepared with examples of previous work and be able to explain why your work was successful. • Examples: If you are interviewing for a marketing manager position, bring examples of marketing plans or product launch plans you’ve created and implemented and be able to explain why the plans were successful. This approach holds true for almost every job. If interviewing for a public relations (PR) position, bring examples of the PR plans you’ve created and implemented and writing examples that demonstrate your skills, such as press releases you’ve written. If interviewing for a product engineering position, bring examples of previous design work and any patents you’ve received. • Why work examples are helpful: Showing a hiring manager previous work, such as a product launch plan, can be helpful. Even better is to then explain why the product launch plan was successful, or parts of it that were not, why and what you learned from the experience. This demonstrates to the hiring manager that you understand how and why things work or do not work – why certain tactics had a direct impact and others did not. Just be sure not to share anything that is company confidential. • Tip #2: Provide the hiring manager with specific reasons why you are the candidate they should hire. • From the notes you took during your first interview and from the job description, prior to your second job interview, write down the top 3-5 attributes the hiring manager is looking for in the candidate who will earn the position. Then, evaluate yourself against these items and determine how your qualifications and experience meet or exceed the requirements. • During your second interview, discuss these with the hiring manager. For example, you might comment: “In our first interview you shared with me the three most important qualifications necessary for this position. They were…” (state the items) “Based on what you’re looking for, I believe I am the best candidate for you to hire because…” and then explain how your experience, education, skills, high-quality work, discipline in getting things done, teamwork, attitude, etc. make you the best person for the job. • How this is helpful: When a hiring manager has narrowed down a candidate pool to a short list, they already know each candidate on this list is qualified for the position – what they’re now looking for are reasons why to hire one candidate over another. This can be a great way for a job candidate to finish the second interview on a positive note. By reminding the hiring manager of the key aspects they’re looking for and explaining him or her why you are the person they should hire, you are helping to make their decision easier by providing your differentiators. 103
  95. 95. • Job Seekers: Avoid Saying This During Interviews • Continued from page 1 • Comment Now Follow Comments • <div style="position:absolute;border:0;margin:0;padding:0;left:0px;top:0px"> <a href="http://pr.ybp.yahoo.com/cj/cd/sgwd5ZHRl8njzP1W5ZrJegc9J7rWXNZlQ0jwhuN5-M- M4ZnOwc1hydeL1wiRTHGEv8XKFprVIsvzJc1CYFHp3A/rurl/https://royale- ssl.spongecell.com/api/ad_tags/51273869/clickthrough?creative_id=315838&noflash=true&nos cript=true&external_placement_id=Tempe_Tourism_300x2_3&external_site_id=SPONGECELL_S ITE_ID&anticache=7538133860373498674" target="_blank"><img alt="" border="0" height="250" src="https://live- ssl.cdn.spongecell.com/tempetourism/december_update/v5.2.6/assets/300x250.jpg" width="300" /></a> <div style="position:absolute;left:0px;top:0px;visibility:hidden;"> <img alt="" height="0" src="https://analytics.spongecell.com/ad_tags/51273869?ad_version=PLATFORM&type=IMPRES SION&flight_id=24065&screen=DEFAULT&noflash=true&noscript=true&creative_id=315838&ext ernal_placement_id=Tempe_Tourism_300x2_3&external_site_id=SPONGECELL_SITE_ID&anticac he=7538133860373498674&e=mc2" style="width:0px;height:0px;" width="0" /> </div> </div> • Some hiring managers will purposely ask interview candidates about the worst aspects of working for a boss or employer. Heads up! These are trick questions to see if you’ll bad mouth a past job, employer, or manager. Answering these types of questions can be difficult, especially if you’re leaving an unhappy work environment or really do work for a terrible boss. While you might like to let loose and vent, a job interview isn’t the time or place – save your angry tirade for a confidential discussion with your best friend. • My advice in answering negative questions is to try your best to turn your answer around into positive comments. Let’s say a hiring manager asks you to explain the top three things you hated the most in a previous job. In your head you might be thinking: My boss was a jerk who 104

Hinweis der Redaktion


  • Unique Approach to Creating and Managing Personal Brand Online
    When it Comes to Online: No One Connects the Dots

    Maybe add few words – pscyh of memory and connection
    Social media hacks
    Promotion – connect w peopl
    Marketing –
    Content hacks for engaging, sharing
    Social Media hacks for reducing time sink
    Marekting + Psychology hacks to make you memorable and build traffic/awareness
    Promotion hacks to get you in front of the right people
  • e secret to getting the job you want boils down to smart networking and a compelling personal brand - this is the special sauce that makes you stand out in a sea of qualified candidates. In the first part of this session, you will create a personal brand that tells your story and conveys your value. Plus, you'll get guidance on the tricky issue of how best to describe your time off as part of your story, and how to showcase your brand in all your online and offline activities. You will master techniques for making yourself memorable in conversation as well as learn the best way to connect online, ask for a meeting, and talk to strangers at a networking event. Part two of this session will provide you with strategies to create a stellar LinkedIn profile so that your experience shines and gets the attention of recruiters and hiring managers. LinkedIn is a powerful networking platform and you will learn tips for using it like a pro to get the introductions, referrals, and meetings you want, even with people you don't know.  Finally, since it is important to keep yourself motivated throughout the uncertainty of a job search, this session will teach you how to create a job search roadmap and track your success. 
  • offers a four-part framework to assist people in articulating their brands and developing a personal branding statement.
  • describe who we are, what we most want people to remember about us. This is a short, hopefully catchy statement, what some may call an elevator pitch that prompts people to say, “I get this person.” Frank would describe her “who statement” as: I am a navigator. I help people find their way.
  • Profoundly changed my view on how the world worked – great leaders think, act communicate the exact same way How Successful People Sell Themselves (Simon Sinek)
  • I love helping others achieve their goals. I work with people to create a compelling persona that conveys their passion and expertise – getting them where they want to go personally and professionally
  • How to create a unique brand and online persona
    Easy strategies for managing your reputation when you interact with others to maximize WOM and be memorable
    10+ proven tactics to build awareness, influence, and engagement
    A roadmap for developing a great content strategy to win at social and search
    My top 5 social media hacks to make you efficient and effective
  • Your presence is how people form their impressions of you – your resume, social networks such as LinkedIn and Twitter, even your own personal blog and website.  These are all great ways for people to find you and learn more about who you are as a person.  In this session, you’ll learn how to make these shine, how to set yourself apart and get your foot in the door.  You’ll get actionable tips for building awareness and influence about your personal brand and leverage efficiency tools so you can focus on your job search, not your social media.
    We are constantly sending a signal to the world
    Voicemail
    Signature line
    Social media: Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Pinterest…
    Website
    Blog
    Podcast
    How you introduce yourself and describe what you do
    Events
  • Why is it important for us to be active in social media? These social networks and communities offer a vehicle for us to nurture our relationships, tap the wisdom of our networks, monitor the latest developments in our fields, share our experience, and contribute to the conversation. It is also where the action is. According to a recent study conducted by Forrester Research, a staggering 100 percent of business decision-makers surveyed use social media for work purposes. Almost all (98 percent) read blogs, watch videos, and listen to podcasts); two-thirds comment on blogs and post ratings and reviews, and 79 percent of those maintain a profile on social networking sites “all in the context of their business activities.”
  • Used by 300 Million people around the world/100 million US
    40% of users check it daily
    More popular than Twitter among US adults
    LinkedIn drives 64% of all visits generated by social media channels to corporate websites
  • The single biggest tip I can give any marketer on LinkedIn is this: Stop treating LinkedIn like an online version of your résumé (“I went to college here, I work at this company, I do this for a job”) and instead make your entire profile what I call client-facing.
    For instance, use the template below (including the ALL CAPS areas!) for your LinkedIn profile’s summary text:
    WHAT I DO: I help [My Target Audience] achieve [Their Desired Outcome] by providing [My product, skill or service offering].
    WHY I’M DIFFERENT: [My USP: What makes me different/better/unique than others who offer similar skills, products or services.]
    WHAT OTHERS SAY: [Insert text from a happy client singing your praises in a specific way that will appeal to your target market.]

    “Ideally, your summary should be around 3–5 short paragraphs long, preferably with a bulleted section in the middle. It should walk the reader through your work passions, key skills, unique qualifications, and a list of the various industries you’ve had exposure to over the years.”
  • The Conrad Maldives Rangali Island Resort hosts the real deal! Situated in the tropical gardens on Rangalifinolhu Island, access to the resort is only by seaplane and while it may sound like any other exclusive get away, the Conrad Rangali will have you dining with stingrays and on special occasions, sleeping with the sharks
  • Cant reorder, only visible to connections, preview not so great

    When you add a link to your Professional Portfolio, the image, title and description will autopopulate, which means that the image drawn from a multi-image article may not be the one you want.
    One way to retain control over images is to upload an image and then enter the information manually. However, you don’t get the benefit of the link being clickable or hyperlinked. It all depends on your priority between clickable links vs. having some control over the image that’s populated.
  • Be Vigilant About Building Recommendations
    Turns out, recommendations may have more benefit than just making you look likeable to potential employers. Stormphorst believes 10 or more recommendations will elevate your profile’s search ranking.

  • Dr. Wayne Dyer, the renowned self-help guru advises, And there lies the secret to how you reverse the impact of low confidence triggers in your life.

    Manciagli coached one client who worried that 14 years as a stay-at-home mom put her out of the running for a great job. “She thought she was going to be a mailroom clerk,” Manciagli says. Taking stock of the skills she’d picked up while raising her family and through her hobby of photography, Manciagli’s client fleshed out her resume—and got hired almost immediately as a college recruiter. “She could speak to college kids and had all the skills to be organized,” Manciagli says.
  • What I found is that having a gap makes very little difference in obtaining an interview. What matters more is how you explain a gap, be it in your resume, cover letter or interview. This is especially true for the stay-at-home moms and dads who take time off from their careers to raise children, as most are worried about how that gap will be perceived by recruiters and hiring managers.

    Keep in mind that it's okay to have gaps in your employment history and that employers are used to seeing them. You're not the first person who has had to take time off work, and you won't be the last.
    You want to explain the situation without going into too much detail. Employers don't need to hear specifics on your medical issues or what your mom was going through when you had to take care of her. They are mainly concerned about what you have been up to. You really want to show that you've been busy and how your experience will help you be a valuable employee. Be sure to include any volunteer work you have done during that time.
    “I have been working as a stay at home mom for the past two years. During that time, I have really perfected my time management and organizational skills. In addition, I have been volunteering at a local food bank where I’ve overseen and coordinated several food drives.”

    It was during that time that I
    - realize my passion for abc
    volunteered at abc
    thats why I am excited to work for your company
    what did you oversee and coordinate
  • that the newbie lacks. And the returning professional may be less expensive and more enthusiastic than the lateral hire. Regarding a skills gap, with many professional fields changing rapidly, returning professionals are often not at a disadvantage, because everyone in the field has to update themselves constantly. Most important, women and men who have been on career break often have many “soft” skills that can make the difference between a so-so hire and a standout. These include leadership ability, the ability to build communal relationships and resourcefulness, developed while pursuing household projects and volunteer endeavors.
  • Even better, extend this positivity to others. Dr. Maya Angelou once said, “At the end of the day people won’t remember what you said or did, they will remember how you made them feel.” We have the ability to give the gift of confidence to everyone we meet by being constructive and kind in all our interactions. I encourage you to be a champion of confidence for others. It not only feels good and helps others, but gives you greater confidence as well.
    Rewrite Your Self Talk
    What are your low confidence triggers when interviewing? (e.g., entering the building, shaking hands with your interviewer, sitting down to start the interview, starting to speak, answering questions) Write them down now. Then write down what you say to yourself when these events occur and how it makes you feel. Cross out any negative “self-talk” and re-write the statements in a positive and assertive manner – a way that makes you feel confident and good about yourself when you read and say them. Turn, “I will never get this job” into “I am the best person for this job. This company needs me.”
    Dr. Wayne Dyer, the renowned self-help guru advises, “If you change the way you look at things, the things you look at change.” And there lies the secret to how you reverse the impact of low confidence triggers in your life
  • t's competitive out there and the little details matter more with crowded applicant pools. Make your case stronger by showing up prepared — check for these five items before you head out the door.
    Bring a sheet separate from your resume that lists your professional references. It's usually a good sign when the interviewer asks for references, so eliminate any hesitation by providing your reference list on the spot.
    Even if you've allowed plenty of time for traffic the unexpected can always happen, like an accident that prevents you from getting to your interview on time. Have the phone number handy so you can call and discuss timing, and possibly reschedule your interview over the phone for
    Print several out on nice paper and carry them with you in the same portfolio where you keep the reference sheet. Interviewers are usually prepared with their own printed version, but what if the printer ran out of ink just before you arrived? Eliminate hassle by supplying a copy of your own.

    another time.

    It is inevitable the interviewer will ask if you have any questions for her. As long as you've remembered to bring the notebook where you outlined prepared questions, this part of the interview will be a breeze.
    ou'll need something to write down notes during your interview, for your own information and if there's anything that triggers questions you may want to save for the end. Just be sure to scribble before you leave the house so you're not stuck with a useless pen.
  • sically, any interviewer wants to establish 3 key things:
    1. Have you got the skills, expertise and experience to perform the job?
    2. Are you enthusiastic and interested in the job and the company?
    3. Will you fit into the team, culture and company?
    However, during the job interview, the interviewer might use many different questions and angles to get to the answers. If the interviewer doesn’t get what he or she wants from one question, they might ask them in different ways. Or they might probe from different angles to test for consistency in your answers.
    Here is what’s behind these 3 questions:
    1. Have you got the skills, expertise and experience to perform the job?
    Think about the key skills you might need for the job you have applied for and assess your own level of expertise and experience in that context. It makes sense to identify the more specific or technical skills that your potential employer might expect as well as some more generic skills such as being a good communicator, having good IT skills, being a team player, etc. Once you have prepared for this question it will help you answer many different interview questions without getting sidetracked into talking about things that are not relevant. Remember that you want to demonstrate that you are aware of the key skills, expertise and experience required to do the job and that you have what it takes to perform it. Always go back to the key skills, expertise and experience when answering scary (and sometimes silly) questions like:
    • Tell me about yourself?

    • What are your greatest strengths / weaknesses?
    • What can you do for us that other candidates can’t?
    • Why do you think you are right for this job?
    • What do you think the main challenges will be?
    • Etc.
    2. Are you enthusiastic and interested in the job and the company?
    Any potential employer wants to know that you are interested in the company and excited about the prospect of working there. You therefore want to demonstrate that you have researched the company, understand its strategy, current performance, structure, market position and products and that you can’t wait to join them. For most, you will have done your homework before you even applied for the job, but if you haven’t then check out the ‘about us’ section on their website and search for the latest strategy documents, annual reports, key statistics as well as the company history. Show that you know them and demonstrate your enthusiasm for the job and company. Here you might also want to think about your ambitions and how they fit into the company you have applied for. You can then use the insights for answering questions such as:
    • What do you know about our company?
    • What do you think our company is aiming to achieve?
    • What do you know about our products and services?
    • Why do you want to work for this company

  • Think about the key skills you might need for the job you have applied for and assess your own level of expertise and experience in that context. It makes sense to identify the more specific or technical skills that your potential employer might expect as well as some more generic skills such as being a good communicator, having good IT skills, being a team player, etc. Once you have prepared for this question it will help you answer many different interview questions without getting sidetracked into talking about things that are not relevant. Remember that you want to demonstrate that you are aware of the key skills, expertise and experience required to do the job and that you have what it takes to perform it. Always go back to the key skills, expertise and experience when answering scary (and sometimes silly) questions like:
  • get personal brand description
  • Any potential employer wants to know that you are interested in the company and excited about the prospect of working there. You therefore want to demonstrate that you have researched the company, understand its strategy, current performance, structure, market position and products and that you can’t wait to join them. For most, you will have done your homework before you even applied for the job, but if you haven’t then check out the ‘about us’ section on their website and search for the latest strategy documents, annual reports, key statistics as well as the company history. Show that you know them and demonstrate your enthusiasm for the job and company. Here you might also want to think about your ambitions and how they fit into the company you have applied for. You can then use the insights for answering questions such as:
    • What do you know about our company?




  • 10-K filing. It's very possible that the company you are applying to is public (which means it's trading on the stock market), and all public companies have to file a 10-K filing. The Form 10-K is basically an annual report compiled by companies that summarizes the firm's performance and backs it up with data. You'll be able to see information on where the firm is going, what they're investing in, their competition, and where the majority of their revenue comes from. You'll be able to discern the firm's strengths and weaknesses, which will be helpful when you're figure out what value you can bring to the company. You can usually find the 10-K document in the investor's section of the corporate website or the SEC's website.
    Annual report. The annual report is a different document from the 10-K and is pretty much a summary of the 10-K findings with less numbers and details and is in a format that is easier for laymen to understand. Reading the annual report and 10-K filing will help you have a better sense of what direction the company wants to take and its future goals. Having this knowledge will make it easier for you to better align your answers with the company's goals.

    Read on for more.

    Press releases. The press releases can be found in the "Press" section of the corporate website and are official documents stating company announcements. It's helpful to read these documents because they are usually up to date and you'll have a good sense of what kind of image the company wants to present and what's important to the company.
    Competitor's documents. When you're done reading up on your dream company, be sure to check out similar documents on its competitor's website. This will help you learn more about the industry and help you come up with new suggestions that your target company will be interested in exploring. Companies are always on top of what their competitors are doing, so your hiring manager will be impressed to know that you've done your research.
  • 1. What’s the most important goal the person in this role needs to accomplish in order to be considered successful?
    When candidates ask this questions they are trying to figure out the real job needs. Their goal is to clarify job expectations, find out the scope of the job, the resources available and the importance of the job.
    2. How will this skill be used on the job?
    When hiring managers start box-checking skills or asking a brain-teaser, smart candidates will ask how the skill will be used on the job. If as the recruiter or a hiring manager you cannot answer this question, it means that you haven’t defined the job well.
    3. Why is this position open?
    The point of this question is to discover if there is some inherent problem with the job or if it’s the result of a positive change.
    4. What happened to the last person in the role?
    This is often a clue to the manager’s ability to select and develop people so make sure you have a good answer.
    5. How will my performance be measured?
    A strong manager can give a very specific answer to this question and set the correct expectations for the role. You should have a clear idea how to reply even if the role is brand new.
    6. Can you go with me through the organization chart?
    The goal for the candidate here is to find out who’s on the team and who they’ll be working with. They’ll want to meet some of these people before accepting an offer or if they’re inheriting a team, they may want to know about the quality and the opportunity to rebuild it.
    7. What is the manager’s vision for the department and the open role?
    This question will reveal the capabilities of the hiring manager, his or her aspirations, and the upside potential of the open job.
    8. What is the manager’s leadership style?
    There could be a problem if the manager is too controlling or too hands-off, reactive or a planner, or a coach or a super techie, etc. Make sure you clarify the hiring manager’s working style and whether it would mesh with the one of the candidate – otherwise both parties will be disappointed in a few months.
    9. How are decisions made at the company? What’s the appetite for change? What’s are the politics/the intensity/the sophistication of the infrastructure?

    5. “How do you plan to deal with...?”
    Every business faces a major challenge: technological changes, competitors entering the market, shifting economic trends... there's rarely a moat protecting a small business.
    So while a candidate may see your company as a stepping-stone, they still hope for growth and advancement... and if they do eventually leave, they want it to be on their terms and not because you were forced out of business.
    Say I'm interviewing for a position at your bike shop. Another shop is opening less than a mile away. How do you plan to deal with the new competitor?
  • When your exhale is even a few counts longer than your inhale, the vagus nerve (running from the neck down through the diaphragm) sends a signal to your brain to turn up your parasympathetic nervous system and turn down your sympathetic nervous system.

    The sympathetics command your fight or flight response, and when they fire, your heart rate and your breathing speed up, and stress hormones like cortisol start pumping through your bloodstream, preparing your body to face a threat. If the threat is, “A lion is chasing me and I need to run away,” this is helpful. If the threat is, “I am late to work” or, “I’m so upset with my mom,” this is not particularly helpful, and in fact it can be damaging – when cortisol is elevated for too long or too frequently it disturbs all the hormonal systems of the body.

    The parasympathetics, on the other hand, control your rest, relax, and digest response. When the parasympathetic system is dominant, your breathing slows, your heart rate drops, your blood pressure lowers as the blood vessels relax, and your body is put into a state of calm and healing.

    Putting your body in a parasympathetic state is easy. Pick a count for your inhale and a count for your exhale that is a little longer. I like starting with 2 counts in, and 4 counts out, with a one count pause at the top of the inhale and a one count pause at the bottom of the exhale.
  • You meet a business acquaintance for the first time – it could be your new boss, a recent addition to your team, or a potential client you want to sign up.
    The moment that stranger sees you, his or her brain makes a thousand computations: Are you someone to approach or to avoid? Are you friend or foe? Do you have status and authority? Are you trustworthy, competent, likeable, confident?
    And these computations are made at lightning speed — making major decisions about one another in the first seven seconds of meeting.
    In business interactions, first impressions are crucial. While you can’t stop people from making snap decisions – the human brain is hardwired in this way as a prehistoric survival mechanism – you can understand how to make those decisions work in your favor.
    First impressions are more heavily influenced by nonverbal cues than verbal cues. In fact, studies have found that nonverbal cues have over four times the impact on the impression you make than anything you say.
  • Body language affects how others see us, but it may also change how we see ourselves. Social psychologist Amy Cuddy shows how “power posing” — standing in a posture of confidence, even when we don’t feel confident — can affect testosterone and cortisol levels in the brain, and might even have an impact on our chances for success.

    Body language is extremely important when it comes to making good first impressions. It's always helpful to know what body cues show you in a positive light, especially during interviews or networking when you're meeting someone for the first time. It can make a difference and even make you more likeable. Keep these tips in mind when you're interacting with another person:

    Smile slowly. If you're too quick to come to a smile or drop one, your expression may not look genuine. Real smiles happen gradually, but remember not to do it too slowly because it can also look creepy. Do your best to mimic a natural smile by practicing in the mirror.
    Speak in a deeper voice. When you're nervous or excited, your voice may come out in a higher pitch. Take a deep breath and lower your pitch, because a deeper voice is considered to have more authority and confidence. In fact, even dogs respond better to deeper voices when you are trying to give them a command.
    Make eye contact. When talking to someone, making eye contact shows interest and also confidence. Don't go overboard and gaze without breaking eye contact, because that can make people feel uncomfortable. Spend the majority of the time making eye contact, but remember to briefly take breaks.

    Read on for more body language cues.

    Have good posture. Sit or stand up straight and avoid slouching. Slouching can make you look less professional and can possibly make you look less confident and enthusiastic.
    Lean. Move your body slightly forward toward the person you're talking to. This reflects interest. However, if you want to show that you're relaxed, lean back a little bit. Don't overdo the leaning or it may either look like you have no idea of what personal space is if you lean forward too much or make you look uninterested and uppity if you lean too far back.
    Don't fidget. Don't fiddle with your hands or shake your leg because that can portray nervousness or restlessness. Relax and slow down your movements.
    Stay uncrossed. Keep your hands and legs uncrossed because that can make you seem cold and distant. If you're not crossing your arms, you'll look more open and less guarded.
    Mirror movements. People often unconsciously mirror people whom they get along with. You can do things like smile or frown along with the speaker or gesture more if you see the other person talking with her hands.

    It's always good to remember that if you're not relaxed, these attempts at better body language may be for naught. When you're nervous, other people will be able to spot that, and it may make them feel a bit jittery in turn. Do some stretches beforehand (and out of sight!) if you're looking to make a good impression on someone, and take deep breaths.
  • No two ways about it: Social psychologist Amy Cuddy’s talk from TEDGlobal 2012 touched a nerve, and sparked a sensation. In the talk, “Your body language shapes who you are,” Cuddy offered a free, low-tech life hack: assume a posture for just two minutes — and change your life. The idea caught on, the talk has now been viewed more than nine million times, and the idea of “power posing” has truly entered the vernacular. For the visualization below, created in conjunction with Brazilian magazine Superinteressante, the designers illustrated some of the points Cuddy makes about posture and its impact on how we feel. Take a look … and stand up straight.

    two ways about it: Social psychologist Amy Cuddy’s talk from TEDGlobal 2012 touched a nerve, and sparked a sensation. In the talk, “Your body language shapes who you are,” Cuddy offered a free, low-tech life hack: assume a posture for just two minutes — and change your life. The idea caught on, the talk has now been viewed more than nine million times, and the idea of “power posing” has truly entered the vernacular. For the visualization below, created in conjunction with Brazilian magazine Superinteressante, the designers illustrated some of the points Cuddy makes about posture and its impact on how we feel. Take a look … and stand up straight.
  • Most people are aware that behavioral questions are increasingly common on interviews these days. But even beyond that, other types of behavior-based methods are being used. Things such as role plays, hypothetical simulations, presentations, case studies and personality and analytical testing are also being used more frequently as companies want to see you in action before making the big decision to hire you. Be sure to check GlassDoor to get specific interview information for the company where you’ll be interviewing.
  • Avoid general statements
    Instead of making general statements such as ‘I am bossy’ you might want to qualify this to specific situations along the lines of ‘When there is a lot of pressure on a project I can come across as bossy’. This way you show that it is not a weakness you have all the time but one that you are aware of in that situation.
    1. Don't give a cop-out answer

    Please don't give tired answers like, "My greatest weakness is that I'm too much of a perfectionist/workaholic." And don’t dodge the question by spinning it positively
    2. Be honest

    Dig deep into yourself and figure out what your true weaknesses are at work. Write them down on a sheet of paper, and figure out which ones you can use in an interview. If you state a weakness you've struggled with, your answer will sound more honest. Some things that will help you come up with true weaknesses is to look at some of the challenges you have faced in your previous jobs or think about constructive criticism you've received from a manager.
    3. Avoid deal breakers

    Although we mention that you should be honest, it's also good to remember that there is such a thing as being too honest. You need to avoid weaknesses that will hurt your chances of getting the job. For example, say if you're applying for an HR position and you say that you're not good with people, or if you're trying for a sales job and you say you are bad at negotiating. This doesn't mean that you have to make up a weakness, but it's just preferable for you to pick another weakness that isn't a deal breaker.
    4. Talk about your attempts to overcome your weakness

    Always talk about the steps you have taken to overcome your weakness. This is your chance to show the interviewer that although you have your flaws, you are proactive and resourceful enough to overcome them. In a way, your effort to conquer your weaknesses will be looked at as a strength.
  • by asking you to do some calculations when you have a phobia of math. Don't. Freak. Out. The worst thing you can do is to clam up when you don't know an answer, because you won't be able to think clearly and may throw out a bad answer in panic. Here's what to do you if you don't know how to answer a questionWhen you don't know how to answer a question during an interview, the silence can seem excruciating. You might even wish the floor would open up and swallow you whole. Not to worry, though — keep these tips in mind the next time you're strapped for an answer.
    1. Calm down.

    First of all, the most important thing to do is stay calm. If you start freaking out, your body will begin reacting physiologically. For example, your blood pressure will start rising, and your heart may race. Once you start a stress response, you won't be thinking clearly, and you may throw out answers without thinking. Take deep breaths, and tell yourself that it's OK to not know the answer to the question. You'll just have to work through it; there's nothing you can do to change things, but you need to stay calm to find the right answer.
    2. Don't say, "I don't know," off the bat. And don't make stuff up.

    You should not tell the interviewer you don't know the answer without mulling it over. Then again, be careful not to make stuff up, because your interviewer can see right through that.
    3. Ask questions.

    Maybe it's the question you don't understand. Ask your interviewer to clarify what she said. Go deeper into the question to see if you can get more details that will help you figure it out.
    4. Tell your interviewer what you do know.

    If you do have some knowledge of the question, then take the time to tell your interviewer what you do know of the situation. Saying everything out loud can start you on the process of figuring out the problem.
    5. Tell them how you would find the answer.

    Even if you don't know what the answer is, you can tell the interviewer the steps you would take to figure out the problem. Interviewers ask you hard questions because they want to see what your thought process is. Sometimes, the thought process
  • It's very important to follow up after a job interview, because even if you think the interview went badly, keeping in touch may improve the interviewer's perception of you. It reflects persistence, and it's also polite to thank the hiring manager after the interview. Remember to also send the note within two days of the interview; although, if you've passed the two-day mark, a late response is better than no response.

    There is such a thing as being too pushy, so keep it light, cheery, and professional. Here is a sample of the kind of email you should send:

    Dear Interviewer,

    It was great meeting you today, and I appreciate you taking the time to interview me. I'm excited to be considered for the (name the position) as well as all of the opportunities the company presents. I had a good time discussing my passion of (insert what you're passionate about) and really enjoyed learning more about (insert what new tidbit you learned about the company).

    Thank you for your consideration, and I look forward to following up with you.

    Best,

    Interviewee

    Remember, you should have asked them when you'll hear about their decision at the end of the interview. If you've forgotten to do that, you can politely add the question to your follow-up email.
  • Whether you are re-entering the workforce after a break, or currently employed and looking for your next job, building your personal brand online and getting involved with social media are essential. The secret to standing out in a sea of qualified candidates boils down to smart networking and a compelling personal brand. This evening will teach you about both in a fun and engaging manner - and you will leave inspired!
  • Personal branding is the foundation, but our careers and social endeavors are greatly enriched and impacted by the ecosystem of resources and support that surrounds us.
  • A good place to begin to build our networks is by taking a simple inventory. Start with our closest relationships, the people we know, our friends and family. Add on school friends, parents of our children’s friends if applicable and relevant, and people that we worked with or volunteered with in the past. Think of people we may have met while traveling, or in a cycling group, or with whom we may attend church or temple. Do not forget former bosses, friends with whom we may have gone to camp, or fraternity brothers or sorority sisters. Add colleagues from work and clients—even competitors.
     
    Some people find it useful to map these contacts visually. Placing ourselves in the center, and as the figure below suggests, we develop categories to classify our relationships. From there we add names to each section. We have found it fruitful to return to this exercise multiple times to see if the process has further jogged our memories.
     
    Continue to add new contacts as appropriate: the people throughout our organizations with whom we interact and those that we connect with at meetings or conferences. Seek out diversity. While our close-knit group of friends and colleagues may always be there for us, they may not be the most effective in helping us stay on the cutting edge of what is happening in the marketing world. The reason is that we probably see the world similarly.
  • Research shows that these “weaker ties” are more likely to provide information about jobs that led to employment than closer friends, because they have access to a different pool of resources, as Figure XX illustrates. On a broader scale, societies in which people have many weak ties in addition to their strong ties have been found to be more innovative.
  • Our networks are verbs, not nouns; we don’t own them, we interact with them.
    To be mutually beneficial, we must try and give something of value in every interaction—not gifts, but information or a useful introduction

  • Ask that person to help you gather information about the company, and try to get some insights into company priorities and culture
    Also see what you can learn about the company’s top motivation in hiring decisions — what priorities or issues the company considers
    Be direct and be proactive. Prepare to ask about specific people they know, and about specific jobs at their companies.
  • Finely tune your searches when you filter by years of experience, seniority level, job function, company size, groups, and more. Premium members get up to 8 additional search filters.
    First, find the Advanced link to the right of the search box at the top of any page. Once you’ve clicked through, all of your Premium filters have a gold LinkedIn logo next to them.
    Whether you’re selling, job-hunting, recruiting, or building your business, you’ve likely got an ideal target in mind.
    Premium filters let you focus on reaching exactly who you need to find, whether they be experience executives, people who work at SMBs, or any other specific segment.

    ou can filter by relationship, groups, location and industry, and the Save Search function even allows you to store effective criteria.
  • In an effort to manage spam, LinkedIn requires members to pay to send InMail. InMail is most useful for members who want to contact a wide variety of people, such as recruiters or individuals using LinkedIn for business development.
    There is one exception in which you can send InMail for free, even if you don’t have a premium account: You can send InMail at no charge to members who participate in the OpenLink Network. LinkedIn identifies these members with the OpenLink icon on their profiles or in search results. To enable other members to send you free InMail, you must specify that you want to participate in the OpenLink Network when you sign up for a premium account.

    LinkedIn premium accounts, including Job Seeker premium accounts, enable you to send a fixed number of InMail messages per month. To learn more about LinkedIn premium accounts and InMail, click the Upgrade link on the navigation menu.
    You can also purchase individual InMails at $10 each by pausing over your photo in the upper-right corner of the screen and selecting Review. Then click the Purchase link below the InMails field on the Account & Settings page. This is cost-efficient only if you want to contact just a few people by InMail.
  • What does a successful InMail/Request for Informational Interview Look Like Reassure the person that you’re not asking for a favor
    No one likes being put on the spot. If people suspect that you’re going to ask them for a job, they may anticipate having to turn you down. Saying no isn’t fun and most people try to avoid it. Be firm that you are just looking for a meeting
    Talk about what makes you qualified
    Show your contact that you are uniquely qualified based on your skills and background
    End with a strong call to action with a time limit
    Mention that you need only 15 minutes of their time. Make sure you end with a clear next step. Are you asking for a phone number? Are you asking to pick a time next week?
    Be respectful = Show appreciation for their time
    Professional appreciation can go a long way and help you look more assertive “I’d really appreciate it if you would…”
  • If someone doesn’t get back to you within a week, you can try sending another request. Assume that this person is simply busy. After the second try, however, assume the answer is no, and stop pursuing this contact. The last thing you want to be is a pest.

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