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Sussex 210612

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keynote for University is Sussex Partner Network day, 21 June 2012. How Oxford Brookes has made use of learner experience research in developing students digital literacies. Also mapping of SLiDA case stuidies to the developmental framework created with Helen Beetham.

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Sussex 210612

  1. 1. Developing students’ digital literaciesDr. Rhona SharpeOxford Centre for Staff and Learning DevelopmentOxford Brookes University
  2. 2. What effect is this investment having, as experienced by learnersWhat have we learnt from learners aboutwhat investment we should be making?
  3. 3. JISC Learner experiences of e-learning projects
  4. 4. JISC Learner experiences of e-learning projects Activity 1What did we find? You will need a blank piece of paper and a pencil Now, turn to your neighbour ….
  5. 5. ‘Digital natives’ are not necessarily digitally literate
  6. 6. Students do not always use thetechnology in the ways expected
  7. 7. JISC Learner experiences of e-learning: Summary• Learners are immersed in technology rich environment• The concept of ‘e-learning’ as course related technology provided by the institution provides a narrow perspective of students’ technology use• Learners have high expectations of institutions to provide robust, reliable and accessible technology.
  8. 8. JISC Learner experiences of e-learning: Summary• Some learners feel disadvantaged by lack of functional access to technology or the skills to use it properly• Some learners are making deliberate choices to adopt sophisticated technology mediated learning strategies, using a range of tools in personalised, creative ways to support their study
  9. 9. New demands on education • Sense making Computational thinking • Social intelligence New media literacy • Adaptive thinking Cognitive load • Cross-cultural management competency Transdisciplinarity • Virtual collaboration Design mindsetDavies, A., Fidler, D., Gorbis, M. (2011) Future Work Skills 2020. Institute for the Future, forthe University of Phoenix Research Institute. University of Phoenix.
  10. 10. Defining digital literacy1. As a list/taxonomy of skills2. As a graduate attribute3. As a series of developmental steps
  11. 11. Information Literacy: SCONUL Seven Pillar Model Working with information Basic library and ICT skills Recognise information need Distinguish ways of addressing gap Construct strategies for locating Information Locate and access Literacy Compare and evaluate Organise, apply and communicate Synthesise and createCONUL Seven Pillars of Information Literacy: tp://www.sconul.ac.uk/groups/information_literacy/seven_pillars.html
  12. 12. SCONUL Seven Pillar Model Revised Working with information Recognise information need Recognise need ways of addressing gap Basic library and ICT skills Distinguish Basic library and ICT skills Distinguish ways of addressing gap Construct strategies for locating Information Learning Construct strategies for locating Locate and access Literacy Literacies Locate and accessand evaluate Compare for a digital age Compare and evaluate and communicate Organise, apply Organise, apply and communicate Synthesise and create Synthesise and create Working with others
  13. 13. Graduate Attributes attributes? What are graduate ‘These attributes include, but go beyond, the disciplinary expertise or technical knowledge that has traditionally formed the core of most university courses. They are ability, dispositions, qualities which enable knowledge gained to be translated into a discipline and work place context.Bowden, J., Hart, G., King, B., Trigwell, K., & Watts, O. (2000) Generic capabilities of ATN university graduates, Canberra: Australian Government Department of Education, Training and Youth Affairs
  14. 14. Digital literacy as a graduate attribute An example: Oxford Brookes University At Oxford Brookes University, digital literacy and information literacy is defined as…  The functional access, skills and practicesnecessary to become a confident, agile adopter of a range of technologies for personal, academic and professional use. https://wiki.brookes.ac.uk/display/slidacases/Oxford+Brookes
  15. 15. Embedding the Graduate Attributes Programme • Programme• GAs Roadshows mapping specification• Resources in • Module the repository • Mapping tools template • Case studies Awareness • Student raising engagement Documentation • Course Design Intensive Events
  16. 16. Mapping the graduate attributes Not ‘one hit’– it works step by step Progression – over time Address all five – GAsare not discrete; can ‘double count’ Range of experiences all shaped by the disciplinary context
  17. 17. Contextualised for the discipline• Using VLE to obtain information, submit work and view formative and summative assessments.• Online database searching for systematic review procedure (Physiotherapy)• Data needs to be analyzed using Excel for the assessed scientific reports (Biology)• Use genomic and transcriptomic databases to construct phylogenies, and to be able to detect gene and protein homologies and functional domains
  18. 18. Digital literacy as a developmental framework (Beetham& Sharpe) Creating learning environments personal practices skills functional access
  19. 19. Whose responsibility??
  20. 20. The SLiDA projectHow are institutions creating and enabling opportunities thatpromote the development of effective learning in a digital age? Acknowledgement: Alfred Lerner Hall © Getty Images.
  21. 21. Key findings from the SLiDA Project1. Prepare students for their experience of learning with technology2. Specify digital literacies in learning and teaching strategies3. Create a culture of engaging with students to inform decision making4. Enable learners to use their own devices and services5. Reconfigure campus spaces for connectivity and social learning
  22. 22. SLiDA Case Studies
  23. 23. Using the developmental framework Creating learning environments personal practices skills functional access
  24. 24. Learner experienceThe big thing that came out of this for me is that it wouldreally help if the lecturers put Institutional as much as they could in an support electronic format (LexDis) Functional access
  25. 25. Access enablers Access barriers Restrictions on access toResources that can be social networking sitesaccessed anywhere Lack of facilities for thoseSingle sign on to range using audio supportof online services Specialist softwareAccess to university available in limitedportal prior to arrival locationsAvailability of campus Unpredictableloan laptops compatibility with institutionally providedTechnical support for hardware and software.personally owned
  26. 26. Learner experienceThe big thing that came out of this for me is that it wouldreally help if the lecturers put Institutional as much as they could in an support electronic format (LexDis) Functional access
  27. 27. Learner experienceI felt that I was doing two coursesand that was, frankly, too much. Ihad to stay with my bad old habits Institutional just because I didnt feel I had support time to learn something new. (LexDis) skills
  28. 28. Learner experienceI felt that I was doing two coursesand that was, frankly, too much. Ihad to stay with my bad old habits Institutional just because I didnt feel I had support time to learn something new. (LexDis) Informatio n Literacy skills Audit
  29. 29. personal practicesPodcast continues to bea great inspiration to the way I learn, I find it sohelpful to listen to again and again (STROLL)
  30. 30. personal practicesPodcast continues to bea great inspiration to the way I learn, I find it sohelpful to listen to again and again (STROLL)
  31. 31. Creating learning environments
  32. 32. Creating learningenvironments
  33. 33. Four things to think about?• To enable functional access, students need preparation for their experience of learningwith technology. Induction is an important stage and students need flexible access to induction resources and activities.• To promoteskills development, digital literacies should be explicitly specified, contextualised for the discipline, and embedded in the curriculum.• Developing effective personal practices requires making good choices about where and how to study. Institutions can support this by configuring spaces to enhance connectivity and social learning.• Creating conditions that encourage students to creatively appropriate their technology use might involve designing curricula that encourage exploratory, experimental uses of technology.
  34. 34. Engaging with students: InstePPOxford Brookes JISC InStePP Project,
  35. 35. SummaryGraduates who will thrive in the digital age will need the confidence and agility to respond to complex and changing circumstance.The powerful influence of context means that teachers and their institutions should take the lead in developing their learners.Learner development can be understood as developing functional access, skills, personal practices and learner created environments.
  36. 36. CreditsAll the images used in this presentation are taken from the JISC Learner Experienceswith E-learning key messages slides, available fromhttps://mw.brookes.ac.uk/display/JISCLE2

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