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Sell Without Selling - Tips to Rock Sales and Proposals

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Sell Without Selling - Tips to Rock Sales and Proposals

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This presentation explores what successful salespeople do to differentiate themselves and ultimately win bigger and better projects.

We discuss SPIN selling, positioning statements, scripts, proposal templates and more.

This presentation explores what successful salespeople do to differentiate themselves and ultimately win bigger and better projects.

We discuss SPIN selling, positioning statements, scripts, proposal templates and more.

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Sell Without Selling - Tips to Rock Sales and Proposals

  1. 1. SELL WITHOUT SELLING linked.com/in/brentbice | @brentbice | brentb@getifx.com
  2. 2. AGENDA 1. Prospecting and research 2. Connecting and qualifying 3. Asking tough questions 4. Scoping projects 5. Writing killer proposals 6. Don’t forget legal 7. Exercise: Creating user stories
  3. 3. Prospect and research work smarter, not harder [1]
  4. 4. WHAT you’re looking to accomplish • Determine if the lead is workable • Set your priority (High/Med/Low) • Start to qualify the lead (SPIN + BANT) • Determine their web/marketing sophistication • Find opportunities to develop a connection •Personalization •Rapport building •Trust development
  5. 5. •You work the company not the contact •Initial research should take 5-10 minutes •Next attempt pre-call review…5 minutes •Add your prospect as a Contact in your CRM (Nimble, Salesforce, Sugar, etc.) •Title your activity: Research •Tag your prospect: Research THINGS to keep in mind…
  6. 6. Connect and qualify activity is key [2]
  7. 7. [2] Build credibility and trust [3] Begin the qualifying process [4] Decide if prospect is a good fit [1] Establish initial relationship [5] Set an initial appointment PURPOSE of Call
  8. 8. LEAD Approach • [Intro] Hello, Prospect. It’s ____ (your name) from iFX______. (Pause) • [Transition] Sounds like I caught you at a bad time? (Pause) • [Purpose] I am calling because I noticed that you came to the website and downloaded our __(offer)_______ on _(date)_. • [Get Them Talking] Does that ring a bell? • What were you looking for help with?
  9. 9. COLD CALL Approach • [Intro] Hello, Prospect. It’s ___ (your name) from _(your company name)______. (Pause) • [Transition] Sounds like I caught you at a bad time? (Pause) • [Purpose] Prospect, I’m calling because I notice you sell business intelligence software. Pause) • I also notice that you are trying to drive leads from your site…(Pause) • [Positioning] My company helps business owners who have a website and are trying to drive more leads but are frustrated because they have spent a lot of effort, maybe on a new site, or SEO, or adwords, but they still aren’t getting the leads and return they had hoped for. • [Get them talking] I was calling to see if… • this might strike a chord with you [or] • You might want to chat for a few moments about this and then see if there is anything worth talking about.
  10. 10. CALLING Referral Leads • [Intro] Hello, Prospect. It’s ___ (your name) from iFX. (Pause) • [Transition] Sounds like I caught you at a bad time? (Pause) • [Purpose] Prospect, I’m calling because (Person’s Name) introduced us over email. (Person’s Name) felt that we should talk. (Pause) • [Positioning] My company helps business owners who have a website and are trying to drive more leads but are frustrated because they have spent a lot of effort, maybe on a new site, or SEO, or adwords, but they still aren’t getting the leads and return they had hoped for? • [Get them talking] I was calling to see if… • this might strike a chord with you [or] • You might want to chat for a few moments about this and then see if there is anything worth talking about.
  11. 11. INBOUND Opportunities • Prospect calls in • [Intro] “Hello, Prospect. (Pause) • Your client, ___(common connection) referred me to you. He said you did a great job helping him ____ . I’m interested in redesigning my site again. Is this something you could help with?” • [Transition] Hey Barry. Nice to meet you. Thanks for calling. John was a pleasure to work with. Since you said “again”, I’m guessing you recently did this and it didn’t have the desired result? Tell me a bit more about why you want to redesign your site again. • With John, his goal was to not just do a redesign, but to figure out how to attract more traffic, capture more leads and convert more leads to customers. Is this something you’re looking to do too? • [Get Them Talking] Tell me a bit more about what you did in the past with your website and online marketing, and what you plan to do going forward?
  12. 12. Positioning Statements • I help small business owners like you who are frustrated that they have spent a lot of money in making improvements to their website and they are still not seeing leads come in as they expected. Typically they have either hired a SEO consultant or put some money into Google Adwords to increase their rankings in search engines. Now they either still fail to show up in the results or they are ranking for some keywords but not seeing any increase in leads. Are you experiencing similar challenges? • I help marketers like you who are frustrated that they’ve spent a lot of time and money working to please the sales team with high quality leads that close faster, but they have yet to see the quality leads they expected from their website and online marketing efforts. Typically they’ve hired an outside agency to do the work, purchased lists or gone to tradeshows in order to achieve their goals and they aren’t seeing the results so upper management and the sales team are concerned. Are you experiencing similar challenges? • When I talk to marketers like you I typically hear that the two biggest aggravations they face on a day to day basis are bringing in enough leads to satisfy their bosses and the challenge of showcasing the ROI their lead generation efforts produce. Does that ring true for you as well?
  13. 13. LISTEN for cues or pain points. It’s incredibly important to stay in the moment and not let your mind wonder.
  14. 14. Preliminary Exploration – High Gain Questions Goals • What are you hoping your website will accomplish? • What metrics do you look at to determine how well you are doing? • Why are these goals important for the business? Challenges • What’s holding you back? • Why is it important to fix these? •If you fix these, would it really make much of an impact on the business? Plan •How are you currently generating new business? •What’s the current plan? •Why not just do more of what you are doing? Timing •It sounds like you are pretty serious about this, why now and not 6 months ago. •What timing is driving your initiatives? •Maybe you should hold off doing something new for now?
  15. 15. Book Exploratory Call • Of all of the challenges we’ve discussed today, are any of them important enough to you that you’d want to start fixing them? • Would you like to schedule an exploratory call to determine whether I can help you? • During this call, we’ll review data about your site and online marketing success to date, as compared to your competitors. Can you provide me with some information, so I can do some homework?
  16. 16. My 5 Favorite Gives • Page Titles Stink • Service Pages Aren’t Optimized • No Good Tofu Calls to Action • No Good Calls to Action on your Blog • Not responsive (usability & search)
  17. 17. Asking tough questions empathy & pain [3]
  18. 18. Questions persuade more powerfully than any other form of verbal communication.
  19. 19. Not all questions are equal.
  20. 20. Closed vs. Open (Probe) Closed Questions: • Can be answered with a single word, often “yes” or “no”. • Do you make purchasing decisions? • Is that important to you? • What is your close ratio? Open Questions: • Require a longer answer which allows you to gather additional information • How are your purchasing decisions made? • Why is that important to you? • How would improving your close ratio impact your business? COMPANIES SPEND BILLIONS OF DOLLARS TEACHING THEIR SALES TEAM TO ASK OPEN QUESTIONS. THEY ARE WASTING MONEY. THERE IS NO EVIDENCE THAT ONE IS BETTER THAN THE OTHER WHEN IT COMES TO THE SUCCESS OF A SALE.
  21. 21. Problem Implication Need / Payoff Situational SPIN Selling
  22. 22. SITUATION Questions Important fact-finding questions: • Often used early in the sales cycle. • What are your sales goals for the year? • Are you on track to reach those goals? • What is your close ratio? • How many leads does your marketing team generate per month? • How are leads generated? The problem with situation questions: • Who benefits from these types of questions – the seller or the buyer? • Important to us, but often bore the buyer. • Research shows that successful salespeople often use less situational questions.
  23. 23. PROBLEM Questions Exploring problems and dissatisfaction in areas where your product can help does numerous things: provides you a better understanding of your market, helps you realize the level of value you could potentially bring to them, builds trust with the buyer in demonstrating your knowledge of the problem. • What challenges are your sales and marketing teams facing? • What actions are you taking to overcome those challenges? • How difficult is it for your marketing team to manage your website content and users? • How much money are you losing per month on those inefficiencies? More success in sales process than problem questions. Very effective for smaller sales and are the foundation for big sales.
  24. 24. IMPLICATION Questions Implication questions take the problem that you’ve already diagnosed and explores its impact or consequences. It takes critical thinking, tact, and deep industry insight. Large sales are won by asking more implication questions. • How are the low number of leads impacting your sales team’s efficiency? • How much additional time does your sales team spend creating their own leads? • How much time does your marketing team waste waiting on a developer to update critical information on your website? More success in sales process than problem questions. Very effective for smaller sales and are the foundation for big sales.
  25. 25. NEED-PAYOFF Questions Research has shown that top sales performers ask these types of questions. The need-payoff questions help paint a picture of “what could be” with your solution. • If we could increase the number of leads you receive by 50% per quarter, how would that impact your sales? • If you could double your sales, how would that impact your business? • If we created a portal that allowed your partners to login and access sales sheets and reports, how much would that reduce your support costs? More success in sales process than problem questions. Very effective for smaller sales and are the foundation for big sales.
  26. 26. Scoping projects [4]
  27. 27. CHAOS Report 39% 43% 18% Average cost overrun: 45% Time overrun: 63% Functionality delivered: 67%
  28. 28. WHY DO PROJECTS Fail? • Inability to communicate • We estimate intangibles • We make the most important decisions when we know least about the product • Business models/requirements change often which changes the scope
  29. 29. Waterfall vs. Agile Requirements Design Implementation Verification Strategy Requirements Design Implementation Verification
  30. 30. User-centered Design
  31. 31. IT Executive Step 1: Identifying Your Audience 5 Busines s Owner Marketing Manager Website Developer
  32. 32. Step 2: What Problems Do They Face As a marketing manager, I find it difficult to determine what type of content provides the most value.
  33. 33. Step 2: What Problems Do They Face As a small business owner, I struggle to generate high-quality leads for my sales team.
  34. 34. Step 2: What Problems Do They Face As a web developer, I’m tired of having my code overwritten by other developers working on the same project.
  35. 35. Step 2: What Problems Do They Face As a potential customer, I find it frustrating that the website does not display well on my phone. I’m forced to zoom in and adjust screed to fit on my phone.
  36. 36. Focus on your customer’s needs and solving their problems.
  37. 37. Prioritize stories by the amount of value they provide to the end-user.
  38. 38. Align stories with business goals.
  39. 39. Step 1: Break story into tasks As a marketing manager, I find it difficult to determine what type of content provides the most value – traffic, engagement and conversion. 1. Install Intelligence module and configure GA. 2. Install AddThis and Disqus and configure APIs. 3. Configure Intelligence based on business goals. 4. Test to ensure it’s tracking correctly.
  40. 40. Step 2: Estimate tasks As a marketing manager, I find it difficult to determine what type of content provides the most value – traffic, engagement and conversion. 1. Install Intelligence module and configure GA. 2. Install AddThis and Disqus and configure APIs. 3. Configure Intelligence based on business goals. 4. Test to ensure it’s tracking correctly. 8 hours
  41. 41. GETTING TO THE Total • Estimate each user story – always keep value in mind. • After estimating all stories, get a total of hours for all stories. • Add 20-30% of total for project management. • Remember…these are estimates!
  42. 42. Writing Killer Proposals [4]
  43. 43. Don’t Forget Legal [5]
  44. 44. Exercise: User Stories [6]

Hinweis der Redaktion

  • VP Levelten Interactive – Help enterprise and mid-market businesses improve their brand, marketing and sales by helping them with creative, and technology.
    VP iFX – Help independent contractors (developers, marketers and consultants) grow their business.
    Marketing
    Sales training
    Accounting
    Legal
    Power in numbers

    What qualifies
  • Why should you bother researching leads beforehand?
    Allows you to build Rapport with your prospect
    Shows that you have researched the business and industry
    Ask for a referral (if you have a common connection)
    Displays that you are genuinely interested in learning more about them
    You are not here to sell them something but rather be a problem solver and trusted advisor
  • The goal of the research stage is to be prepared for the Prospect, Connect, and Qualify stages of the sales process. This includes:
    Determine whether the lead is workable and, if so, the priority of the lead (High/Med/Low)
    Begin to understand the qualification of the lead to purchase your services
    Understand the company and your contact’s knowledge of/with inbound marketing
    Identify opportunities for personalization, trust development, rapport building
  • A lead is a company, not just a contact. It is important to work the company.
    Researching a lead prior to the first attempt should take 5 minutes or less. Follow on attempts should be a 5 minute review of the notes captured during the initial research.
    Capture all notes in the Contacts > Add Note section of Nimble. Add a Tag for that user titled “Research”
  • Why should you bother researching leads beforehand?
    Allows you to build Rapport with your prospect
    Shows that you have researched the business and industry
    Ask for a referral (if you have a common connection)
    Displays that you are genuinely interested in learning more about them
    You are not here to sell them something but rather be a problem solver and trusted advisor
  • There’s a structured sequence that occurs in a connect call and we’ll address each one of those stages today. A connect call should be used to:

    Establish an initial relationship with the prospect
    Build some initial credibility and trust
    Begin the qualifying process
    Decide if the prospect is a good initial fit for an IMA
    Set The Initial Appointment – The IMA
  • So for example, it starts with the Intro – “Hello Prospect, it’s Brent Bice from iFX”. Remember to Pause at this point since you need them to drop what they are doing, try to identify your company and start paying attention to you. You are then going to get their permission to continue by transitioning and making sure you caught them at an ok time by saying “Sounds like I caught you at a bad time?”. Remember to Pause again. Your next step is to share the purpose of your call and this is going to be easy since they are an inbound lead. You will something like “I am calling because I was notified that you came to the website and downloaded our ___ on ___. Does that ring a bell?”. Wait for their response and get them talking by saying something like “What were you looking for help with?”

    Remember, the first big battle of a connect is to break them out of what they are doing and get them talking. This is much easier with inbound. Don’t be too much of a hard ass yet, we’ll get into that later.
  • Now, it is much easier to get the conversation going with an inbound lead. They came to our website and they took an action. We know they were looking for something. With a cold call approach, it is tougher but if you follow the framework, it isn’t too different. The start of the call may be a bit awkward so remember to breathe and don’t rush. So a flow would be something like “Hello, Corey. It’s Jeetu Mahtani from HubSpot”. Pause. Break them out of what they are currently doing and get them to pay attention. Get permission to continue by asking “Sounds like I caught you a bad time?”. Pause. Continue with the purpose “Corey, I’m calling because I notice you sell business intelligence software.” Pause again. “I also notice that you are trying to drive leads from your site”. Pause and move to your Position statement, which is the next step of your Connect. We’ll talk about Positioning in just a moment.
  • Here is a framework when calling a referral leads.
  • Now, of course in cases when someone calls in asking for help. It may not happen always but it will happen when you do great work, your clients will remember you and will be excited to refer prospects to you. The Connect approach is actually faster and you can usually transition directly into asking questions and getting them to talk.
  • Know your audience and write positioning statements for them.
  • So now, you’ve completed your introduction, transitioned to get them to pay attention, delivered your Positioning Statement to share your expertise and relate to them. You are now ready to get them talking.

    It’s amazing what a well positioned positioning statement can do, the same goes for simple open ended questions like “what were you looking for help with”. This can often elicit a response that has several points of interest that will perk your ears up and make you want to dig deeper on them.
  • After the give/get you might have a chance to do some preliminary exploration, here are some good questions you can use placed around this concept of GPCT which we’ll discuss more in our next session.

    The RED questions are a bit more negative in approach.
  • I’m a big of fan knowing your limits on a connect and knowing when to move it to the next step and stop asking questions. It’s hard to explain, but after you do this several times you’ll get a feel for when it’s time to begin to wrap up.

    Looking at this slide these are all great ways to begin the wrap up sequence and move towards the actual tie down of time/date on the calendar.
  • Have these in mind before you call!
  • The difference between being a used car salesman and a Trusted Advisor.
  • Shut up and listen
  • The types of questions asked distinguish us from the pack and position us as thinkers, listeners and trusted advisors.
  • Neal Rackham wrote spin selling from researching nearly 35,000 sales calls. The goal was to better understand what differentiated successful sales people from the average joe. His findings were that there was a direct correlation between the types of questions people ask and their sales success.
  • Think about your product(s) and the problems they solve.
  • Think about your product(s) and the problems they solve.
  • Think about your product(s) and the problems they solve.
  • The difference between being a used car salesman and a Trusted Advisor.
  • Standish Group
    Over 1000 surveys of IT projects
  • Think about your product(s) and the problems they solve.
  • Requirements gathering for large projects is a challenge. Either the client comes to us with an RFP and all the specs ready to go (which is rare), or they want their website redesigned, but usually focus on the look rather than their user/business goals in mind.
  • Shut up and listen
  • This often times directly, or closely correlates with Drupal’s Roles / Permissions system.
  • Testing notes.
  • Testing notes.
  • Testing notes.
  • Testing notes.
  • Shut up and listen
  • Shut up and listen
  • Shut up and listen
  • Testing notes.
  • Notes:
    This can be a time consuming process – especially if you are developing a custom solution
    Get developers involved in the process. More than one is recommended to get averages.
    Again, these are estimates. Humans rarely estimate accurately. You can expect a 20% range above or below this estimate.
  • Think about your product(s) and the problems they solve.
  • IF you’ve built rapport and trust, and asked the right questions (Implication / Need-Payoff), chances are, you’ve already won the project. You could probably write your proposal on a napkin and get the project. But we are professionals and want to ensure that we win the business. Let’s look at how we pull it all together within the proposal.
  • The difference between being a used car salesman and a Trusted Advisor.
  • Creating a product

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