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Digital Authorship
Renee Hobbs
Harrington School of Communication & Media
University of Rhode Island
Summer Institute in D...
ACCESS
Digital and Media Literacy Competencies
Digital and media literacy is a response to the
contemporary cultural environment
The context of media, technology and pop...
Digital and media literacy is a
response to the contemporary
cultural environment
What Are Media?
How Many Do You Recognize?
On average, Americans watch 4 hours, 51 minutes of broadcast and
cable television per day
…20% of waking hours
Advertisers spent $189 billion to reach customers in 2014
$70 billion $36 billion
2013 Global Revenue
We are socialized to be
active or passive users
of media
Nutrition Substance Abuse Stereotypes
Media Affect Attitudes & Behaviors
Sexuality Aggression
Online Social
Responsibility
Media Affect Attitudes & Behaviors
balancing empowerment & protection
The context of media, technology
and popular culture provides
fuel for creative expression
Literacy is expanding
Learning Happens
In and Out of School
Parents are Role Models
Teachers are Role Models
Teachers are role models
PewDiePie
earned $7.5
million from
YouTube
videos in
2014
The Famous are Role Models
making connections between culture & classroom
Hip Hop Music Composition
as Media Literacy
Because All Media Are Going Digital
Remix Creativity is Becoming Normative
Students’ creativity can be
channeled in different ways
depending on teachers’
motivations, goals & values
There is an Art to Creating a Digital Literacy
Learning Environment
Cloud-Based Digital Tools Support
Digital Authorship
Writing
KidBlog
Google Docs
Titanpad
Wikispaces
WordPress
Storybird
S...
Educators Have Different Motivations for
Using Media & Technology in Education
12
We Are Heroes
Screencasting Hamlet Scene Study
Global Collaboration
Analyzing a YouTube Video
Screencasting the Critical Questions
School Spirit Lip Dub
Digital authorship involves issues
of creative control
“How do I get started?”
Digital Authorship as a Learning Process
involves Issues of Creative Control
“What is our topic?”
...
Students Learn to Share Control
Digital Authorship as a Learning Process
involves Issues of Creative Control
TEACHERSTUDENT
 Develop a well-structured activity with a clear audience,
purpose & learning outcomes
 Inspire creative work from learn...
 They tap into student passions,
pleasures, knowledge and
experience
 They take advantage of
unpredictable moments in so...
Digital Authorship Accelerates through
Collaboration
When people create with media
and technology as a way to learn,
they develop critical thinking,
communication, collaborati...
Belshaw, 2012
Analyzing a YouTube Video
Screencasting the Critical Questions
Analyzing a YouTube Video
Screencasting the Critical Questions
Simple Media Production with
Screencasting
REMEMBER:
Consider the Attitudes, Values
and Beliefs of Your Target
Audience
Analyzing a YouTube Video
Screencasting the Critical Questions
Hobbs, R. & Moore, D. (2013). Discovering media literacy: Teaching digital media and popular culture in elementary
school....
Professor Renee Hobbs
Harrington School of Communication and Media
University of Rhode Island
Email: hobbs@uri.edu
Twitter...
Digital Authorship
Digital Authorship
Digital Authorship
Digital Authorship
Digital Authorship
Digital Authorship
Digital Authorship
Digital Authorship
Digital Authorship
Digital Authorship
Digital Authorship
Digital Authorship
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Digital Authorship

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Renee Hobbs offers the keynote address at the Summer Institute in Digital Literacy, showcasing K-16 educators, librarians and non-profit organizations helping students use digital tools for creative expression, advocacy and learning.

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Digital Authorship

  1. 1. Digital Authorship Renee Hobbs Harrington School of Communication & Media University of Rhode Island Summer Institute in Digital Literacy July 28, 2015
  2. 2. ACCESS Digital and Media Literacy Competencies
  3. 3. Digital and media literacy is a response to the contemporary cultural environment The context of media, technology and popular culture provides fuel for creative expression Students’ digital creativity can be channeled in different ways depending on teachers’ motivations, goals & values Digital authorship involves issues of creative control When people create media as a way to learn, they build critical thinking, communication, collaboration & citizenship skills
  4. 4. Digital and media literacy is a response to the contemporary cultural environment
  5. 5. What Are Media?
  6. 6. How Many Do You Recognize?
  7. 7. On average, Americans watch 4 hours, 51 minutes of broadcast and cable television per day …20% of waking hours
  8. 8. Advertisers spent $189 billion to reach customers in 2014
  9. 9. $70 billion $36 billion 2013 Global Revenue
  10. 10. We are socialized to be active or passive users of media
  11. 11. Nutrition Substance Abuse Stereotypes Media Affect Attitudes & Behaviors
  12. 12. Sexuality Aggression Online Social Responsibility Media Affect Attitudes & Behaviors
  13. 13. balancing empowerment & protection
  14. 14. The context of media, technology and popular culture provides fuel for creative expression
  15. 15. Literacy is expanding
  16. 16. Learning Happens In and Out of School
  17. 17. Parents are Role Models
  18. 18. Teachers are Role Models
  19. 19. Teachers are role models PewDiePie earned $7.5 million from YouTube videos in 2014 The Famous are Role Models
  20. 20. making connections between culture & classroom
  21. 21. Hip Hop Music Composition as Media Literacy
  22. 22. Because All Media Are Going Digital
  23. 23. Remix Creativity is Becoming Normative
  24. 24. Students’ creativity can be channeled in different ways depending on teachers’ motivations, goals & values
  25. 25. There is an Art to Creating a Digital Literacy Learning Environment
  26. 26. Cloud-Based Digital Tools Support Digital Authorship Writing KidBlog Google Docs Titanpad Wikispaces WordPress Storybird Slideshows Kizoa Animation Animoto Powtoons Screencasting SnagIt Screencast-o-Matic Screenr Video Production YouTube WeVideo Videolicious Shadow Puppet Coding Scratch
  27. 27. Educators Have Different Motivations for Using Media & Technology in Education 12
  28. 28. We Are Heroes
  29. 29. Screencasting Hamlet Scene Study
  30. 30. Global Collaboration
  31. 31. Analyzing a YouTube Video Screencasting the Critical Questions
  32. 32. School Spirit Lip Dub
  33. 33. Digital authorship involves issues of creative control
  34. 34. “How do I get started?” Digital Authorship as a Learning Process involves Issues of Creative Control “What is our topic?” “When is it due?” “How long should it be?” “Do have to work with a partner?” “How do I get an A?”
  35. 35. Students Learn to Share Control
  36. 36. Digital Authorship as a Learning Process involves Issues of Creative Control TEACHERSTUDENT
  37. 37.  Develop a well-structured activity with a clear audience, purpose & learning outcomes  Inspire creative work from learners  Carefully monitor small groups  Learn how to use technology tools  Dedicate an appropriate amount of time to the process When teachers encourage students to create media as a way to demonstrate their learning, they:
  38. 38.  They tap into student passions, pleasures, knowledge and experience  They take advantage of unpredictable moments in social interactions  They address relational and social issues among members of the class When teachers encourage students to create media as a way to demonstrate their learning: High levels of interpersonal trust and respect are important to promote creative expression in learners
  39. 39. Digital Authorship Accelerates through Collaboration
  40. 40. When people create with media and technology as a way to learn, they develop critical thinking, communication, collaboration & citizenship skills
  41. 41. Belshaw, 2012
  42. 42. Analyzing a YouTube Video Screencasting the Critical Questions
  43. 43. Analyzing a YouTube Video Screencasting the Critical Questions
  44. 44. Simple Media Production with Screencasting
  45. 45. REMEMBER: Consider the Attitudes, Values and Beliefs of Your Target Audience
  46. 46. Analyzing a YouTube Video Screencasting the Critical Questions
  47. 47. Hobbs, R. & Moore, D. (2013). Discovering media literacy: Teaching digital media and popular culture in elementary school. Thousand Oaks: Corwin/Sage. Hobbs, R. (2013). Improvization and strategic risk taking in informal learning with digital media literacy. Learning, Media and Technology, 38(2), 1 – 28. Hobbs, R. & RobbGrieco, M. (2012). African-American children’s active reasoning about media texts as a precursor to media literacy. Journal of Children and Media 6(4), 502 - 519. Grafe, S., Hobbs, R., Boos, M., Bergey, B. (2012). Teachers´ motivations for media education in Germany and in the United States. Paper presentation at Digital Media and Learning(DML) Conference, Los Angeles. Hobbs, R., Ebrahimi, A., Cabral, N., Yoon, J., & Al-Humaidan, R. (2011). Field-based teacher education in elementary media literacy as a means to promote global understanding. Action for Teacher Education 33, 144 – 156. Hobbs, R., Yoon, J., Al-Humaidan, R., Ebrahimi, A. & Cabral, N. (2011). Online digital media in elementary school. Journal of Middle East Media 7(1), 1 – 23. “Messy Engagement and Strategic Risk Taking as an Instructional Strategy in Informal Learning,” Paper presentation, International Communication Association (ICA), Phoenix, AZ. May 28, 2012. Hobbs, R. , Cohn-Geltner, H. & Landis, J. (2011). Views on the news: Media literacy empowerment competencies in the elementary grades. In C. Von Feilitzen, U. Carlsson & C. Bucht (Eds.). New questions, new insights, new approaches. The International Clearinghouse on Children, Youth and Media. NORDICOM. University of Gothenburg, Sweden (pp. 43 – 56).
  48. 48. Professor Renee Hobbs Harrington School of Communication and Media University of Rhode Island Email: hobbs@uri.edu Twitter: @reneehobbs Web: www.mediaeducationlab.com

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