Diese Präsentation wurde erfolgreich gemeldet.
Die SlideShare-Präsentation wird heruntergeladen. ×

Learning Lunch Box Nov 2013 - Kevin Pimbblet presentation

Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Wird geladen in …3
×

Hier ansehen

1 von 16 Anzeige

Weitere Verwandte Inhalte

Diashows für Sie (19)

Ähnlich wie Learning Lunch Box Nov 2013 - Kevin Pimbblet presentation (20)

Anzeige

Weitere von rachelsaffer (20)

Aktuellste (20)

Anzeige

Learning Lunch Box Nov 2013 - Kevin Pimbblet presentation

  1. 1. An active learning paradigm in physics teaching K.A.Pimbblet (kevin.pimbblet@monash.edu)
  2. 2. Motivation
  3. 3. Motivation
  4. 4. Motivation l  If lectures are for learning, as I contend, then I’m failing if I give a “traditional” lecture. l  Lectures are, hands-down, one of the worst ways in which to learn. l  Psychologists have known this result for a long time, but us physicists are only just hearing about it & doing something about it.
  5. 5. Motivation
  6. 6. Ingredients List l  Students are required to, (& assessed on), reading the textbook prior to attending class. l  Class time is ~100% active learning via concept & other questions integrated alongside live demo’s and videos that students have a stake in. l  Clickers form an integral part of the class for instant formative diagnostics & feedback. l  Weekly problem sheets, tutorials & labs to reinforce learning. NB: Red items not yet implemented at Monash.
  7. 7. Example Clicker Question l  Tanks A and B are the same apart from their widths. How does the force of the water at the bottom of the tanks compare? OPTIONS: 1.  2.  3.  F(A) = F(B) F(A) > F(B) F(A) < F(B)
  8. 8. Example Clicker Question l  Tanks A and B are the same apart from their widths. How does the force of the water at the bottom of the tanks compare? OPTIONS: 1.  2.  3.  F(A) = F(B) F(A) > F(B) F(A) < F(B)
  9. 9. Example Clicker Question Tanks A and B are the same apart from their widths. How does the force of the water at the bottom of the tanks compare? 50% 48% F( B ) A )< F( B ) F( A )> F( B ) 3.  3% A )= 2.  F(A) = F(B) F(A) > F(B) F(A) < F(B) F( 1.  F( l 
  10. 10. Example Clicker Question In the previous question it became readily apparent that there was a problem with the basic understanding of fluids. l  This directly caused us to spend more time discussing the connections between pressure, force, gravity, water density, height of the tank & its area. l  This would not have been caught in traditional lectures as quickly, and could readily have gone un-addressed. l 
  11. 11. Student Feedback (UQld) l  This survey encompassed 67/93 students. l  Lectures were the most popular part of the course by a long way – attendance remained very high throughout the course; it was still over 70% in week 13. l  Reading was done by the majority; time was the main factor cited for not doing the reading.
  12. 12. Student Feedback (UQld)
  13. 13. Student Feedback (UQld)
  14. 14. Student Feedback (UQld)
  15. 15. Hard Numbers We ran a pre-test and post-test at UQld on first year physics topics in 2009 & 2010. l  Normalized gain (traditional) ~ 25% l  Normalized gain (active learning) 60%+/- a few l  This ~60% gain is on par with the best in the world. QED for me.
  16. 16. Summary: HAVE A GO!!! l  It takes longer to prepare these classes than traditional lectures. l  Slightly less material can be put in the course, but the students gain a better understanding of the material that is in there. l  Concept questions must be carefully chosen to maximize effect. l  It is far better to have a question provoke discussions than not.

×