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Teaching spontaneity!?!  The  new  GCSE speaking exam Joined Up! Bringing it all together Rachel Hawkes  [email_address] w...
<ul><li>To give a brief overview of the main changes to the GCSE specification  </li></ul><ul><li>To look at implications ...
“ Across all phases speaking is the least well developed of all the skills. Students’  inability to be able to say what th...
Reasons to focus on speaking new  Ofsted framework new  secondary curriculum re new ed framework new  GCSE “ Employers wan...
<ul><li>Strengthening of requirement that contexts and purposes should be relevant to candidates’ likely interests, corres...
<ul><li>GCSE subjects will have 0%, 25% or 60% CA </li></ul><ul><li>Percentage fixed for each subject, not optional  </li>...
<ul><li>Writing  </li></ul><ul><li>“ Informal supervision” of preparation </li></ul><ul><li>Awarding body indicates what t...
<ul><li>Speaking  </li></ul><ul><li>“ Informal supervision” of preparation </li></ul><ul><li>Awarding body indicates what ...
<ul><li>60% GCSE now under teacher control </li></ul><ul><li>‘ Active’ knowledge to be tested can be determined by the tea...
Challenges of controlled assessment Rachel Hawkes <ul><li>What are the implications of controlled assessment for teachers?...
Changing how we teach Rachel Hawkes <ul><li>Preparing students to respond to questions effectively </li></ul><ul><li>Embed...
Rachel Hawkes NEW secondary curriculum (speaking related PoS) 1.1  Linguistic competence a.  Developing the skills of list...
Year 7 Framework - speaking Year 8 Framework - speaking Year 9 Framework –  speaking 1.4  Talking together Y7  Construct a...
NEW GCSE Assessment criteria (speaking component - Edexcel) Communicates comprehensive and detailed information related to...
Open Interaction GCSE Example: Spanish Rachel Hawkes
NEW GCSE Assessment criteria (speaking component - Edexcel) Communicates comprehensive and detailed information related to...
Rachel Hawkes Edexcel GCSE 2010 Units 2 & 4 Speaking and Writing Unit Grade A* A B C D E F G Maximum Uniform mark = 90 81 ...
How do you teach  ‘spontaneous talk’? Rachel Hawkes
What do you think we mean by unplanned or spontaneous speaking? a) Lack of prior preparation b) Absence of written support...
Why do you think unplanned or spontaneous speaking is an important focus in language learning? &quot;Because in real life ...
Define a confident language learner - how would he/she cope in an unplanned speaking situation? &quot;They would cope real...
<ul><li>Speaking targets </li></ul><ul><li>Give detailed information </li></ul><ul><li>Express personal opinions </li></ul...
<ul><li>Listen to the question VERY carefully – work to make sense of it </li></ul><ul><li>Buy yourself time with a ‘hesit...
A ver... Pues... Bueno.. Entonces.. Para mí.. En mi opinión... Por ejemplo ... O sea... Es decir ...
¡No te olvides!
 
Developing talking routines for  all  students Rachel Hawkes
Asking questions <ul><li>Group talk routines </li></ul><ul><li>Find someone who </li></ul><ul><li>Speaking lines </li></ul...
 X Es ist toll! ¡Es ist schrecklich! Ich mag das  (nicht) !   Wie findest du das? Ja, das stimmt! ¡Nein, das stimmt nicht...
 X ¡Es fenomenal! ¡Es fatal! ¡ (No)  me gusta!  ¿Qué piensas? ¡Sí, es verdad! ¡No, no es verdad! ¡Yo también! ¡Yo tampoco...
¿Qué piensas? ¡Yo también! ¡Yo tampoco! ¿Por qué? ¿Por qué? Porque... Porque... ¡Sí, es verdad! ¡No, no es verdad! Pienso ...
Has dicho que.... pero yo pienso que. (No)  me gusta porque ...  Pienso que... Sí, tienes razón No, no tienes razón  X Po...
Sprachschlange
Findet eine Person, die…………. 1.  den Geburtstag im Februar hat 2.  nicht in England geboren ist   3.  mehr als eine Schwes...
Was sind die Fragen?   1.  Wann hast du Geburtstag? 2.  Wo bist du geboren? 3.  Hast du Geschwister? 4.  Hast du Haustiere...
Was sind die Fragen? 1. Es donnert und blitzt. 2. Die Hauptstadt von Österreich ist Wien. 3. Nein.  Und du? 4. Ich fahre n...
Meine Schule <ul><li>Wann?  Was? Wo?  Wie?   Warum? Wie oft? </li></ul>Discuss school life with your partner for a minimum...
Rachel Hawkes Target  talk Odd  one out Spot the  difference 5 Ws? Reading  images Extensions Then  & now Tell a  story Sa...
Was wirst du heute abend machen? Now make sure your answer contains EXACTLY 8 words! Now make sure your answer contains 4 ...
Odd One Out - Model Plays an  individual Sport Only blond person Only woman Professional Sportsmen Not brilliant at their ...
¡Pilla al intruso! Rachel Hawkes desayunar comer merendar cenamos descansar leche pan zumo té café queso jamón mermelada f...
Rachel Hawkes Pienso que/Creo que I think that La excepci ón/el intruso es.. the exception is porque.. because/for es feme...
<ul><li>Menciona 2 diferencias </li></ul><ul><li>2) Responde a 2 preguntas </li></ul><ul><li>3) Haz 2 preguntas </li></ul>...
¿Qué? ¿Quién?  ¿Cuándo?  ¿Dónde?  ¿Por qué? Gracias @ Pete Spain
A B Rachel Hawkes Hay montañas grandes. El paisaje es muy verde. Hay muchos árboles. No hay muchas casas. La casa es vieja...
¿Qué va a hacer Lara este verano? ¿Qué no va a hacer ? Rachel Hawkes
¿Adónde? ¿Cómo? ¿Con quién? ¿Cuándo? ¿Qué más? Rachel Hawkes
Sitges Cataluña, Spain 2009 Rachel Hawkes Hace 50 años, había más rocas en la playa. Hoy no hay rocas en la playa.
Me gusta jugar al f útbol pero no me gusta/prefiero jugar con los videojuegos porque (no) es (muy) divertido con = with y=...
¿Dónde estamos? ¿Qué o quién hay en la foto? ¿Qué se puede ver? ¿Qué no se puede ver? ¿Cuándo se hizo la foto? ¿Qué acaba ...
¿Dónde estamos? ¿Qué o quién hay en la foto? ¿Qué se puede ver? ¿Qué no se puede ver? ¿Cuándo se hizo la foto? ¿Qué acaba ...
¿Dónde estamos? ¿Qué o quién hay en la foto? ¿Qué se puede ver? ¿Qué no se puede ver? ¿Cuándo se hizo la foto? ¿Qué acaba ...
Task:  Picture-based discussion <ul><li>Generate as many  questions  as you can that you could ask about this picture </li...
Me encanta la natación – es mi deporte preferido.  Empecé a nadar cuando tenía cinco años y llevo siete años nadando por u...
Task setting Rachel Hawkes <ul><li>Is the task something that will engage my students?  </li></ul><ul><li>Does the task ar...
Task taking Rachel Hawkes <ul><li>Timing of assessments  </li></ul><ul><li>Number of students assessed at one time </li></...
Olympus WS-321M Digital Voice Recorder ( www.amazon.co.uk ) £56.47 Logitech USB Desktop Microphone ( www.amazon.co.uk )  £...
<ul><li>Prepare a list of all possible questions on the theme that you think could be answered well spontaneously </li></u...
Task marking Rachel Hawkes <ul><li>Marking ‘live’ or from recording </li></ul><ul><li>Standardisation / Internal moderatio...
To support controlled assessment Rachel Hawkes <ul><li>'GCSE modern foreign languages: controlled assessment of speaking -...
Joined up  thinking! Rachel Hawkes Comberton Village College AST Former Regional Subject Advisor SSAT Lead Practitioner  w...
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  1. 1. Teaching spontaneity!?! The new GCSE speaking exam Joined Up! Bringing it all together Rachel Hawkes [email_address] www.rachelhawkes.typepad.com/linguacom
  2. 2. <ul><li>To give a brief overview of the main changes to the GCSE specification </li></ul><ul><li>To look at implications for the way we teach speaking </li></ul><ul><li>To listen to a sample GCSE speaking test and assess using new criteria </li></ul><ul><li>To share ideas and practice for curriculum planning and assessment organisation and management </li></ul>Aims of this session Rachel Hawkes
  3. 3. “ Across all phases speaking is the least well developed of all the skills. Students’ inability to be able to say what they want to say in a new language has a negative impact on their confidence and enthusiasm .” ‘ When required to speak at greater length or in new situations, [students’] accuracy and fluency deteriorate, partly because their grasp of structure is usually less secure than their retention of vocabulary .’ “ ...it was much rarer for reading or listening to be used to stimulate discussion and communicative activities .” “ A further hindrance to speaking fluently was that sound-spelling links not been taught well .” “ Overall, there was insufficient emphasis on helping students to use the language spontaneously for real situations . Consequently, too few students could speak creatively, or beyond the topic they were studying, by making up their own sentences in an unrehearsed situation . Several students said that being able to say what they wanted to say would improve their enjoyment.” The changing landscape of languages Rachel Hawkes
  4. 4. Reasons to focus on speaking new Ofsted framework new secondary curriculum re new ed framework new GCSE “ Employers want conversational ability, which will give a good impression, help to build relationships and make new contacts.” Extract from a House of Lords Debate, 3 December 2009 Are there other things that you would like to be able to say in an unplanned situation which you either haven’t learned in class yet or have not fully understood? I just want to talk fluent Spanish Rachel Hawkes
  5. 5. <ul><li>Strengthening of requirement that contexts and purposes should be relevant to candidates’ likely interests, correspond to their level of maturity and relate to the culture of countries where the target language is spoken </li></ul><ul><li>Some choice of context or purpose for speaking and writing tasks, including the possibility for centres to propose a context or purpose of their own </li></ul><ul><li>Controlled assessments 60%: speaking and writing with up to 10% allowed for listening/reading </li></ul><ul><li>Range for weighting of Assessment Objectives (20-30%) </li></ul><ul><li>No limit on proportion of marks for responses in English in listening and reading comprehension tests </li></ul><ul><li>Instructions to candidates can be in English </li></ul><ul><li>Tiering to be retained </li></ul><ul><li>Short courses for either L&S or R&W </li></ul><ul><li>Some changes to grade descriptions (to be confirmed) </li></ul><ul><li>Some changes to grammar lists for French, German & Spanish </li></ul>GCSE: revised subject criteria for MFL taken from Chris Maynard presentation 2008
  6. 6. <ul><li>GCSE subjects will have 0%, 25% or 60% CA </li></ul><ul><li>Percentage fixed for each subject, not optional </li></ul><ul><li>MFL has 60% CA, covering S & W with up to 10% allowed for L/R </li></ul><ul><li>Minimum two tasks for each component (S & W) </li></ul><ul><li>Tasks must require candidates to use language for different purposes </li></ul><ul><li>Three possibilities for schools: </li></ul><ul><li>- Use exemplar tasks provided by awarding body </li></ul><ul><li>- Adapt awarding body tasks </li></ul><ul><li>- Design your own tasks within defined parameters </li></ul>GCSE controlled assessment (1) taken from Chris Maynard presentation 2008
  7. 7. <ul><li>Writing </li></ul><ul><li>“ Informal supervision” of preparation </li></ul><ul><li>Awarding body indicates what teacher support is allowed </li></ul><ul><li>Candidates must complete work independently under controlled conditions </li></ul><ul><li>Candidates are permitted access to a dictionary and may refer to limited notes (but not to an earlier draft) </li></ul><ul><li>Awarding body indicates required length (min & max) </li></ul><ul><li>Awarding body marks all candidates’ work </li></ul>GCSE controlled assessment (2) taken from Chris Maynard presentation 2008
  8. 8. <ul><li>Speaking </li></ul><ul><li>“ Informal supervision” of preparation </li></ul><ul><li>Awarding body indicates what teacher support is allowed </li></ul><ul><li>Candidates must provide an individual response, but they may work with others, eg in a conversational group </li></ul><ul><li>Candidates may refer to limited notes </li></ul><ul><li>Awarding body indicates required length (min & max) </li></ul><ul><li>Teachers to assess using awarding body mark scheme </li></ul><ul><li>A sample of candidates to be recorded for external moderation purposes </li></ul><ul><li>Exemplification and Training to be provided </li></ul>GCSE controlled assessment (3) taken from Chris Maynard presentation 2008
  9. 9. <ul><li>60% GCSE now under teacher control </li></ul><ul><li>‘ Active’ knowledge to be tested can be determined by the teacher </li></ul><ul><li>Timing of assessments flexible </li></ul><ul><li>Content of assessments can be centre-devised or chosen from ‘best-fit’ themes </li></ul><ul><li>Opportunity to tailor KS4 to follow on from KS3 </li></ul><ul><li>60% untiered – differentiation by outcome </li></ul><ul><li>Opportunity for learner choice in assessment </li></ul>Benefits of new GCSE Rachel Hawkes
  10. 10. Challenges of controlled assessment Rachel Hawkes <ul><li>What are the implications of controlled assessment for teachers? </li></ul><ul><li>We will need to: </li></ul><ul><li>re-think how we teach and assess speaking </li></ul><ul><li>consider what sorts of tasks will be motivating for students </li></ul><ul><li>decide how best we can take advantage of the opportunities </li></ul><ul><li>choose, adapt or design tasks that will give our students the best opportunity to show what they can do </li></ul><ul><li>ensure that we teach learners in the optimum way </li></ul>
  11. 11. Changing how we teach Rachel Hawkes <ul><li>Preparing students to respond to questions effectively </li></ul><ul><li>Embedding questioning </li></ul><ul><li>Adapting key phrases </li></ul><ul><li>Move from memorising -> manipulating language readily </li></ul><ul><li>Developing spontaneous talk in the classroom </li></ul><ul><li>Building on learning at KS3 </li></ul>
  12. 12. Rachel Hawkes NEW secondary curriculum (speaking related PoS) 1.1 Linguistic competence a. Developing the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing in a range of situations and contexts. b. Applying linguistic knowledge and skills to understand and communicate effectively. 1.2 Knowledge about language a Understanding how a language works and how to manipulate it. 1.3 Creativity a Using familiar language for new purposes and in new contexts . b Using imagination to express thoughts, ideas, experiences and feelings . 2.2 Developing language skills c respond appropriately to spoken and written language d use correct pronunciation and intonation e ask and answer questions f initiate and sustain conversations k deal with unfamiliar language, unexpected responses and unpredictable situations.
  13. 13. Year 7 Framework - speaking Year 8 Framework - speaking Year 9 Framework – speaking 1.4 Talking together Y7 Construct and generate language, using a stock of words, phrases and sentences for social communication and to talk about their work Y7 Make effective use of simple verbal or visual prompts in order to take part in conversations and discussions 1.5 Presenting and narrating Y7 Plan and present a short talk or narrative, speaking clearly, audibly and with accurate pronunciation Y7 Engage listeners’ attention through expression and non-verbal techniques 4.4 Sentence structure Y7 Use knowledge of word order, high-frequency words and punctuation to understand and build simple and compound sentences 4.6 Questions and negatives Y7 Understand and use confidently some common question types in different contexts Y7 Understand and use confidently some common negative forms in different contexts 1.4 Talking together Y8 Initiate and participate in unrehearsed pupil-teacher and pupil-pupil exchanges Y8 Plan and carry out unscripted conversations and discussions, taking into account the views, preferences and ideas of each group member 1.5 Presenting and narrating Y8 Use some complex language in a prepared but unscripted talk or narrative Y8 Add authenticity through use of simple idioms 4.4 Sentence structure Y8 Develop and improve sentences by adding, rearranging or replacing elements 4.6 Questions and negatives Y8 Understand and use a range of question types Y8 Understand and use a range of negative forms 1.4 Talking together Y9 Make extended and/or frequent contributions to classroom talk Y9 Deal effectively with unexpected responses in order to sustain conversations and discussions 1.5 Presenting and narrating Y9 Respond quickly and appropriately to audience comments or questions following a talk or narrative Y9 Add interest through extended sentences, rhetorical devices and imaginative use of vocabulary 4.4 Sentence structure Y9 Use knowledge of word order, phrases and clauses to understand and build a wider range of extended sentences 4.6 Questions and negatives Y 9 Make confident use of question types with simple and compound tenses Y9 Make confident use of negative forms with simple and compound tenses
  14. 14. NEW GCSE Assessment criteria (speaking component - Edexcel) Communicates comprehensive and detailed information related to chosen stimulus Interacts very well Speaks very confidently and with spontaneity . Frequently takes initiative and develops elaborate responses . No difficulty in expressing and explaining a range of ideas and points of view. Very little or no hesitation . Able to deal with unpredictable elements without difficulty. 16-18 Communicates detailed and relevant information related to chosen visual/topic/stimulus. Interacts well. Speaks confidently . Takes initiative and develops more elaborate responses . Has little difficulty expressing and explaining ideas and points of view. Little hesitation and little or no prompting necessary. Able to deal with unpredictable elements with some success. 12-15 Communicates relevant information related to the chosen stimulus but with some obvious omissions. Some interaction. Able to participate in familiar, straightforward discussion and conversation, but experiences problems with more complex question forms. Conveys opinions, but rarely expands . Some hesitation Able to deal with some unpredictable elements. 8-11 Limited communication related to chosen visual/topic/stimulus. Some coherence in unambiguous presentation of simple information and opinions, but responses very limited. Very hesitant and reliant on teacher-examiner prompting. Able to deal with isolated unpredictable elements. 4-7 Minimal description of chosen stimulus. Conveys little relevant information in minimal responses (mainly one word) Largely disjointed and unconnected ideas. Very limited comprehension of basic questions. Wholly-reliant on teacher-examiner prompting.. 1-3
  15. 15. Open Interaction GCSE Example: Spanish Rachel Hawkes
  16. 16. NEW GCSE Assessment criteria (speaking component - Edexcel) Communicates comprehensive and detailed information related to chosen stimulus Interacts very well Speaks very confidently and with spontaneity Frequently takes initiative and develops elaborate responses No difficulty in expressing and explaining a range of ideas and points of view Very little or no hesitation Able to deal with unpredictable elements without difficulty 16-18 Uses wide range of appropriate vocabulary and structures, including complex lexical items Consistently competent use of different tenses. 6 Very accurate, with only isolated and usually insignificant errors. Consistently good pronunciation and intonation. 6 Communicates detailed and relevant information related to chosen visual/topic/stimulus. Interacts well. Speaks confidently. Takes initiative and develops more elaborate responses. Has little difficulty expressing and explaining ideas and points of view. Little hesitation and little or no prompting necessary. Abe to deal with unpredictable elements with some success. 12-15 Good variety of appropriate vocabulary and structures. Unambiguous use of different verb tenses. Generally at ease with subordination. 5 Some errors, especially in more complex structures, but generally accurate. Pronunciation and intonation generall y good. 5 Communicates relevant information related to the chosen stimulus but with some obvious omissions. Some interaction Able to participate in familiar, straightforward discussion and conversation, but experiences problems with more complex question forms. Conveys opinions, but rarely expands . Some hesitation Able to deal with some unpredictable elements. 8-11 Adequate but predictable range of vocabulary and structures. May include different tenses or time frames, perhaps with some ambiguity Some examples of subordination 3-4 A fair number of errors made, including some basic, but communication overall unaffected. Pronunciation and intonation generally accurate. 3-4 Limited communication related to chosen visual/topic/stimulus. Some coherence in unambiguous presentation of simple information and opinions, but responses very limited. Very hesitant and reliant on teacher-examiner prompting. Able to deal with isolated unpredictable elements. 4-7 Limited and/or repetitive range of vocabulary or structures. Predominantly uses short sentences 2 Many basic errors, but main points communicated. Simple ‘pre-learnt’ stereotypes correct. Pronunciation generally understandable. 2 Minimal description of chosen stimulus. Conveys little relevant information in minimal responses (mainly one word) Largely disjointed and unconnected ideas. Very limited comprehension of basic questions. Wholly-reliant on teacher-examiner prompting.. 1-3 Very limited range of basic structures Frequently resorts to non-target language Rarely offers complete sentences. 1 Consistently inaccurate language and pronunciation frequently impede communication Only isolated examples of accurate language. 1
  17. 17. Rachel Hawkes Edexcel GCSE 2010 Units 2 & 4 Speaking and Writing Unit Grade A* A B C D E F G Maximum Uniform mark = 90 81 72 63 54 45 36 27 18 Uniform mark as percentage 90 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 Suggested raw mark boundaries based on percentages 28 25 22 18 14 11 8 5 GROUP : Task:   STUDENT NAMES Tutor group Content & Response (18) Range of language (6) Accuracy (6) Total mark (30) projected grade 1             0 U 2             0 U 3             0 U 4             0 U 5             0 U 6             0 U 7             0 U 8           0 U
  18. 18. How do you teach ‘spontaneous talk’? Rachel Hawkes
  19. 19. What do you think we mean by unplanned or spontaneous speaking? a) Lack of prior preparation b) Absence of written support c) The immediacy of the experience d) Like a conversation e) Not knowing the questions/answers in advance 289 students from Years 7 – 10 from 5 different secondary schools were asked.
  20. 20. Why do you think unplanned or spontaneous speaking is an important focus in language learning? &quot;Because in real life you don't know what the other person is going to say.&quot; 2/3 students asked equate spontaneous speaking with ‘real life’ activity. &quot;To make sure you definitely know it and are able to have conversations without reading off a sheet.&quot; Students feel that what they can do without notes/preparation is what they 'truly' know. They also mention the link between spontaneous speaking and increased confidence.
  21. 21. Define a confident language learner - how would he/she cope in an unplanned speaking situation? &quot;They would cope really well because they would speak confidently and spontaneously really easily' 2/3 answers are unrealistic and do not mention strategies or attributes of a language learner in unrehearsed speaking situations. 1) Most answers stress fluency as key 2) Fewer mention accuracy 3) Top set students most likely to mention accuracy AND fluency together 4) A few mention quality of language, including range of vocabulary, tense use, opinions, extended answers - particularly Year 10 learners and 9 top sets 5) Rare answers mention attributes of a confident learner mentioned were: risk-taking, not afraid of mistakes, responds readily, good pronunciation 6) Very few mentioned these strategies: listen carefully to pick out key words and understand the question, take time to think, use words and structures they know, ignore mistakes and keep going, use gestures and facial expression to help support meaning
  22. 22. <ul><li>Speaking targets </li></ul><ul><li>Give detailed information </li></ul><ul><li>Express personal opinions </li></ul><ul><li>Justify points of view </li></ul><ul><li>Use longer sequences of speech </li></ul><ul><li>Use a variety of vocabulary and structures </li></ul><ul><li>Use time references </li></ul><ul><li>Refer to the past </li></ul><ul><li>Refer to the future </li></ul>Do these speaking targets work for spontaneous talk? Can learners have these sorts of targets in their heads in an unplanned speaking situation? If not, what targets or strategies would we give to learners who are trying to hold a 'conversation' in the target language?
  23. 23. <ul><li>Listen to the question VERY carefully – work to make sense of it </li></ul><ul><li>Buy yourself time with a ‘hesitation’ word </li></ul><ul><li>Think of something you know you can say quickly – e.g. Repeat back a couple of words of the question with raised intonation - ¿Todos los días? </li></ul><ul><li>Use what you know how to say when you put your answer together (not necessarily exactly what you want to say) </li></ul><ul><li>Keep talking for as long as you can – it’s always easy to add in a ‘por ejemplo’ or an opinion </li></ul><ul><li>When you are beginning to run out of flow, ask a question! (¿Y tú?) </li></ul><ul><li>Use other ‘help’ to get your message across well – i.e. expression, emotion – sound like you mean it + facial expressions + body language + gestures </li></ul>“ A confident language learner wouldn't panic, would listen carefully for key words to respond to and take time to think about answer.” “ A confident learner would use the words they do know to turn the conversation to what they are comfortable to speak about - use heavy facial expression and body language.” “ A confident learner would be able to use what they know already to come up with appropriate responses - and maybe even ask new questions.”
  24. 24. A ver... Pues... Bueno.. Entonces.. Para mí.. En mi opinión... Por ejemplo ... O sea... Es decir ...
  25. 25. ¡No te olvides!
  26. 27. Developing talking routines for all students Rachel Hawkes
  27. 28. Asking questions <ul><li>Group talk routines </li></ul><ul><li>Find someone who </li></ul><ul><li>Speaking lines </li></ul><ul><li>What are the questions? </li></ul><ul><li>Free conversation tasks </li></ul>
  28. 29.  X Es ist toll! ¡Es ist schrecklich! Ich mag das (nicht) ! Wie findest du das? Ja, das stimmt! ¡Nein, das stimmt nicht! Ich auch! Ich nicht! Du bist verrückt! Ich denke... X X Gracias @ Greg Horton
  29. 30.  X ¡Es fenomenal! ¡Es fatal! ¡ (No) me gusta! ¿Qué piensas? ¡Sí, es verdad! ¡No, no es verdad! ¡Yo también! ¡Yo tampoco! ¡Estás loco/a! Pienso que... X X Gracias @ Greg Horton
  30. 31. ¿Qué piensas? ¡Yo también! ¡Yo tampoco! ¿Por qué? ¿Por qué? Porque... Porque... ¡Sí, es verdad! ¡No, no es verdad! Pienso que... porque Prefiero.. porque  X ..es mejor que.. ..es peor que.. ..es más..que.. ..es menos..que. ¿Qué piensas? Sí, tienes razón No, no tienes razón ¡Ni hablar! ¡Qué va! (no) estoy de acuerdo ¡ (No) me gusta!  X X 
  31. 32. Has dicho que.... pero yo pienso que. (No) me gusta porque ... Pienso que... Sí, tienes razón No, no tienes razón  X Por una parte..pero por otra parte.. Sí, yo también No, yo tampoco  X ¿Qué piensas? ¡Ni hablar! ¡Qué va! (no) estoy de acuerdo
  32. 33. Sprachschlange
  33. 34. Findet eine Person, die…………. 1. den Geburtstag im Februar hat 2. nicht in England geboren ist 3. mehr als eine Schwester hat 4. keine Haustiere hat 5. Deutsch als Lieblingsfach hat
  34. 35. Was sind die Fragen?   1. Wann hast du Geburtstag? 2. Wo bist du geboren? 3. Hast du Geschwister? 4. Hast du Haustiere? 5. Was ist dein Lieblingsfach?
  35. 36. Was sind die Fragen? 1. Es donnert und blitzt. 2. Die Hauptstadt von Österreich ist Wien. 3. Nein. Und du? 4. Ich fahre nach Schottland, um Nessie zu sehen. 5. Er geht ins Kino. 6. Gestern bin ich zu Hause geblieben. 7. Man kann Skifahren 9 .Vielleicht 8 . Ich werde die Burg besichtigen
  36. 37. Meine Schule <ul><li>Wann? Was? Wo? Wie? Warum? Wie oft? </li></ul>Discuss school life with your partner for a minimum of 5 minutes. You will need to ask and answer questions. Try to keep the conversation going! Und du?
  37. 38. Rachel Hawkes Target talk Odd one out Spot the difference 5 Ws? Reading images Extensions Then & now Tell a story Say something else Understanding & responding
  38. 39. Was wirst du heute abend machen? Now make sure your answer contains EXACTLY 8 words! Now make sure your answer contains 4 words of 3 letters! This time make sure your answer contains the word NICHT!
  39. 40. Odd One Out - Model Plays an individual Sport Only blond person Only woman Professional Sportsmen Not brilliant at their chosen careers! Married Couple British Celebrities Jackie Howis AST Bennett Memorial Diocesan School
  40. 41. ¡Pilla al intruso! Rachel Hawkes desayunar comer merendar cenamos descansar leche pan zumo té café queso jamón mermelada fruta golosinas despierta desayuna energía come cena agua tostadas cereales queso uvas frutas verduras hortalizas cereales dulces
  41. 42. Rachel Hawkes Pienso que/Creo que I think that La excepci ón/el intruso es.. the exception is porque.. because/for es femenino/masculino It’s feminine/masculine es la única cosa que It’s the only thing that es la única palabra que It’s the ony word that un verbo – un adjetivo – un sustantivo a verb - an adjective - a noun …… .tiene que ver con…. …… ..has to do with/is all about…….. por ejemplo …tiene que ver con los deportes e.g. …….has to do with sport por ejemplo for example …… .es diferente …… .is different termina con… ends with.. empieza con… starts with es un tipo de... it’s a sort of (el) hidrato de carbono (la) carne (la)grasa (la)fruta y (las)verduras (la) proteína alto en colestero alto en azúcar bajo en fibra alto en calorías rico en vitaminas una fuente de calcio (el)dulce
  42. 43. <ul><li>Menciona 2 diferencias </li></ul><ul><li>2) Responde a 2 preguntas </li></ul><ul><li>3) Haz 2 preguntas </li></ul>A B Rachel Hawkes
  43. 44. ¿Qué? ¿Quién? ¿Cuándo? ¿Dónde? ¿Por qué? Gracias @ Pete Spain
  44. 45. A B Rachel Hawkes Hay montañas grandes. El paisaje es muy verde. Hay muchos árboles. No hay muchas casas. La casa es vieja y gris/marrón. Pienso que es un lugar muy tranquilo.
  45. 46. ¿Qué va a hacer Lara este verano? ¿Qué no va a hacer ? Rachel Hawkes
  46. 47. ¿Adónde? ¿Cómo? ¿Con quién? ¿Cuándo? ¿Qué más? Rachel Hawkes
  47. 48. Sitges Cataluña, Spain 2009 Rachel Hawkes Hace 50 años, había más rocas en la playa. Hoy no hay rocas en la playa.
  48. 49. Me gusta jugar al f útbol pero no me gusta/prefiero jugar con los videojuegos porque (no) es (muy) divertido con = with y= and pero = but porque = because La pirámide opini ón + actividad (infinitivo) + pero + opini ón opuesta/ complementaria + actividad (infinitivo) + raz ón Rachel Hawkes
  49. 50. ¿Dónde estamos? ¿Qué o quién hay en la foto? ¿Qué se puede ver? ¿Qué no se puede ver? ¿Cuándo se hizo la foto? ¿Qué acaba de pasar? ¿Qué va a pasar ahora?
  50. 51. ¿Dónde estamos? ¿Qué o quién hay en la foto? ¿Qué se puede ver? ¿Qué no se puede ver? ¿Cuándo se hizo la foto? ¿Qué acaba de pasar? ¿Qué va a pasar ahora?
  51. 52. ¿Dónde estamos? ¿Qué o quién hay en la foto? ¿Qué se puede ver? ¿Qué no se puede ver? ¿Cuándo se hizo la foto? ¿Qué acaba de pasar? ¿Qué va a pasar ahora?
  52. 53. Task: Picture-based discussion <ul><li>Generate as many questions as you can that you could ask about this picture </li></ul><ul><li>Assume that the learner will present for 1 minute to introduce the picture </li></ul><ul><li>Think about how you can make use of previous classroom routines , both to enable the student to answer spontaneously and use a range of language </li></ul>Rachel Hawkes
  53. 54. Me encanta la natación – es mi deporte preferido. Empecé a nadar cuando tenía cinco años y llevo siete años nadando por un club. Es el club de natación basado en la piscina de Parkside en Cambridge. Me encanta porque puedo entrenar para mejorar. Mi entrenadora se llama Beth y es super simpática. Siempre me anima y me apoya. Lo malo es que tengo que madrugar porque tengo que entrenar tres veces a la semana antes de ir al colegio. Pero no me importa eso porque me gusta la natación. También participo en competiciones regionales algunos fines de semana que me encantan. 1 minute introduction 1. Bueno, dime primero,¿ Dónde estamos en esta foto? 2. Y descríbeme la foto un poquito, ¿ qué se puede ver ? 3. ¿ Quiénes hay en la foto? ¿Estás tú en la foto? 4. Y esta piscina – parece que en la foto está abierta al público - ¿ Hay también clases de natación allí para los alumnos? 5. Y el agua, ¿no está fría? Porque la piscina está al aire libre ¿no? 5. ¿ Cuándo se hizo esta foto ? 6. . ¿Y la natación es un deporte muy popular aquí en el instituto? 7. Y ¿ qué va a pasar en el futuro? ¿Qué planes tienes para el futuro? ¿Piensas seguir nadando como profesión? Discussion questions Rachel Hawkes
  54. 55. Task setting Rachel Hawkes <ul><li>Is the task something that will engage my students? </li></ul><ul><li>Does the task arise naturally from the work my students are doing? </li></ul><ul><li>Does the task provide appropriate challenge for my students? </li></ul><ul><li>Is the task accessible to all students, including any students with disabilities? </li></ul><ul><li>Am I making good use of opportunities to customise tasks, for example by referring to local circumstances, or topical issues or aspects of the culture, life and traditions of target language countries or communities? </li></ul><ul><li>Is the task manageable for me? Would it be possible to record it if necessary? </li></ul><ul><li>Should I provide a stimulus in English or in the target language? </li></ul><ul><li>Does the task allow my students to meet the marking criteria laid down by the awarding body? </li></ul><ul><li>Can I see how the exam board’s marking criteria can be used to assess performance on this task? </li></ul>
  55. 56. Task taking Rachel Hawkes <ul><li>Timing of assessments </li></ul><ul><li>Number of students assessed at one time </li></ul><ul><li>Location of assessments </li></ul><ul><li>Release of stimulus material to students </li></ul><ul><li>Length of assessments </li></ul><ul><li>Recording of assessments </li></ul>
  56. 57. Olympus WS-321M Digital Voice Recorder ( www.amazon.co.uk ) £56.47 Logitech USB Desktop Microphone ( www.amazon.co.uk ) £17.65 Free software to download: http://audacity.sourceforge.net/ NB: must download LAME Encoder too or won’t save as MP3 http://audacity.sourceforge.net/help/faq?s=install&item=lame-mp3 Easi Speak Digital Voice Recorder ( www.easi-speak.org.uk ) £25 Rachel Hawkes
  57. 58. <ul><li>Prepare a list of all possible questions on the theme that you think could be answered well spontaneously </li></ul><ul><li>Make a copy of this sheet so that you have one per student </li></ul><ul><li>Use this list as you listen to the student presentation and or picture-based introduction and highlight questions that you could ask to follow up on (but not repeat) the material </li></ul><ul><li>Allow yourself more leeway at the start of the day as the first few take longer </li></ul><ul><li>Try out the recording equipment yourself in good time before the exams to familiarise yourself and become confident </li></ul><ul><li>Before each recording say: Candidate Name & Number, Centre Name, the task type and topic and the date </li></ul><ul><li>When you save the sound file, name it usefully (see Audacity instructions) to when your sample is requested (months later!) you can find the material easily. </li></ul>Top tips so far….. Rachel Hawkes
  58. 59. Task marking Rachel Hawkes <ul><li>Marking ‘live’ or from recording </li></ul><ul><li>Standardisation / Internal moderation </li></ul><ul><li>External moderation </li></ul>
  59. 60. To support controlled assessment Rachel Hawkes <ul><li>'GCSE modern foreign languages: controlled assessment of speaking - guidance for teachers’ </li></ul><ul><ul><li>free copies of this DVD obtainable via http://orderline.qcda.org.uk/ </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>order reference: QCA/09/4138 </li></ul></ul>
  60. 61. Joined up thinking! Rachel Hawkes Comberton Village College AST Former Regional Subject Advisor SSAT Lead Practitioner www.rachelhawkes.typepad.com/linguacom [email_address] Rachel Hawkes Save the date! Monday 29 November Joined Up Conference Comberton Village College, Cambridgeshire

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