Diese Präsentation wurde erfolgreich gemeldet.
Wir verwenden Ihre LinkedIn Profilangaben und Informationen zu Ihren Aktivitäten, um Anzeigen zu personalisieren und Ihnen relevantere Inhalte anzuzeigen. Sie können Ihre Anzeigeneinstellungen jederzeit ändern.
Social networks and the Semantic Web:
A retrospective of the past 10 years
P R E S E N T E D B Y P e t e r M i k a , D i r...
Based on interviews with:
2
 John Breslin
› Senior Lecturer in Informatics and Engineering at NUI Galway
› Researcher, Un...
The idea of the Social-Semantic Web
3
 “At the doctor's office, Lucy instructed her
Semantic Web agent through her handheld Web
browser. The agent promptly ret...
One slide intro to the Semantic Web
 Create URIs for real-world things, not just web resources
› (In practice) URIs are c...
Data distributed across the Web
Joe’s homepage
Joe’s blog
Mary’s homepage
(#name, #type, #Property)
(#name, #domain, #Pers...
The Semantic Web off to a slow start
 Standardization ahead of adoption
› URI, RDF, RDF/XML, RDFa, JSON-LD,
OWL, RIF, SPA...
The Social Web
 The Social Web followed web architecture
› Links, blogrolls, pingbacks etc. between individual homepages ...
The promise of the Social-Semantic Web
9
 The Semantic Web as the ideal platform for distributed social networks
› Connec...
Putting it together:
Social networks and the Semantic Web
10
Semantic Web
Online social networks
Social-Semantic Web Onlin...
What happened?
11
What happened to the Semantic Web?
 Consolidation in terms of the technology stack
› RDF/XML turned out to be a dead-end
...
What happened to the Semantic Web? (2)
13
 Data publishing (finally) starts to take off
1. Linked Open Data
• Opening up ...
14
What happened to the Social Web?
What happened to the Social Web? Post-2004
 “Web 2.0”: commercial interests in social data lead to silos
› Data portabili...
What happened to the Social-Semantic Web?
16
 Representations
› Profile data and content
• FOAF (Friend-of-a-Friend) onto...
What is left of our hopes for the Social-Semantic Web?
17
 Connect digital identities across networks (sameAs)
› One-off ...
The work continues
18
 W3C Social Activity
› W3C Social Interest Group
• Use cases TF
• Vocabularies TF
› W3C Social Web ...
What happened to online social science?
19
 Online social science is booming
1. Studies of online social phenomena
• Qual...
Challenges
20
 Limited access to data and experimentation platforms
› As a result, studies are still small-scale and one-...
Final thoughts
21
 Semantic Web technology
› Too little, too late for the Social Web? Or can we still build a federated s...
Q&A
 Contact me
› pmika@yahoo-inc.com
› @pmika
› http://www.slideshare.net/pmika/
Nächste SlideShare
Wird geladen in …5
×

Social Networks and the Semantic Web: a retrospective of the past 10 years

4.553 Aufrufe

Veröffentlicht am

Keynote given at the 7th International Workshop on Web Intelligence and Communities, see http://www.tmrfindia.org/WIC15/

Veröffentlicht in: Technologie
  • Als Erste(r) kommentieren

Social Networks and the Semantic Web: a retrospective of the past 10 years

  1. 1. Social networks and the Semantic Web: A retrospective of the past 10 years P R E S E N T E D B Y P e t e r M i k a , D i r e c t o r , S e m a n t i c S e a r c h , Y a h o o L a b s ⎪ M a y 1 8 , 2 0 1 5
  2. 2. Based on interviews with: 2  John Breslin › Senior Lecturer in Informatics and Engineering at NUI Galway › Researcher, Unit Leader at the Insight Centre for Data Analytics (formerly DERI) › Creator of SIOC › Co-founder and Director of boards.ie  Harry Halpin › Team member at W3C › Post-doc at CSAIL, MIT › Author of Social Semantics: The Search for Meaning on the Web › W3C team contact for the Social Web WG  Henry Story › Co-founder and CTO of Stample › Previously Social Web architect at Sun Microsystems › W3C WebID XG chair (now WebID CG)
  3. 3. The idea of the Social-Semantic Web 3
  4. 4.  “At the doctor's office, Lucy instructed her Semantic Web agent through her handheld Web browser. The agent promptly retrieved information about Mom's prescribed treatment from the doctor's agent, looked up several lists of providers, and checked for the ones in-plan for Mom's insurance within a 20-mile radius of her home and with a rating of excellent or very good on trusted rating services. It then began trying to find a match between available appointment times (supplied by the agents of individual providers through their Web sites) and Pete's and Lucy's busy schedules.”  (The emphasized keywords indicate terms whose semantics, or meaning, were defined for the agent through the Semantic Web.) 5/18/20154 The Semantic Web (2001)
  5. 5. One slide intro to the Semantic Web  Create URIs for real-world things, not just web resources › (In practice) URIs are composed of namespace + localname › Joe the Person has the URI ns:Joe  Basic unit of information is a triple › A tuple of (subject, predicate, object) › Example: (ns:Joe, type, Person), (#Joe, name, “John Doe”)  An RDF model is a set of triples › Standalone RDF documents: RDF/XML, JSON-LD › Embedded inside HTML: RDFa, JSON-LD  Schemas (ontologies) are also represented in the same model ns:Joe “John Doe” foaf:name foaf:Personrdf:type rdfs:subclassOf foaf:Agent
  6. 6. Data distributed across the Web Joe’s homepage Joe’s blog Mary’s homepage (#name, #type, #Property) (#name, #domain, #Person) schema doc (#joe, #name, “Joe A.”) (#joe, #email, mailto:joe@joe.com) (#joe, #loves, #mary) (#mary, name, “Mary B.”) (#mary, gender, “female”)
  7. 7. The Semantic Web off to a slow start  Standardization ahead of adoption › URI, RDF, RDF/XML, RDFa, JSON-LD, OWL, RIF, SPARQL, OWL-S, POWDER …  Chicken and egg problem › No data consumers/apps, hence no incentive to publish data › No data means no interested consumers/apps
  8. 8. The Social Web  The Social Web followed web architecture › Links, blogrolls, pingbacks etc. between individual homepages and blogs › First SNSs (e.g. LiveJournal) simply implemented the same within one system › Typical usage is browsing from blog to blog or profile to profile Alice’s blog Bob’s blog Charlie’s blogreads reads links to
  9. 9. The promise of the Social-Semantic Web 9  The Semantic Web as the ideal platform for distributed social networks › Connect digital identities across networks (sameAs) › Connect distributed conversations across networks › Having a profile in one network, and linking it to content elsewhere › Fine-grained access control through existing web protocols › Competition in services, e.g. search over social content  A boon to Online Social Science › Tools for data acquisition, data fusion, storage and querying › Significantly increase the size, frequency and longitude of social studies through digital data collection › Contribute to the improvement of technology by the study of technology usage
  10. 10. Putting it together: Social networks and the Semantic Web 10 Semantic Web Online social networks Social-Semantic Web Online Social Science enables informs the design of The Social-Semantic Web aims at creating shared representations of social data and improving the interoperability of social applications online, in the benefit of (a) the Semantic Web and (b) the study of online social behaviour.
  11. 11. What happened? 11
  12. 12. What happened to the Semantic Web?  Consolidation in terms of the technology stack › RDF/XML turned out to be a dead-end › JSON-LD winning developer hearts (e.g. at Yahoo) › RDFa and Microdata preferred over microformats (e.g. OGP, schema.org)  SPARQL provides a query language and protocol › But still few RDF triple-stores directly accessible on the Web  Tooling improved › Editors, validators, annotators, query composers, browsers, RDF APIs etc.  Linked Data Platform (2015) a step toward a Read/Write Semantic Web › Crucial for social applications wanting to read/write profile information and content
  13. 13. What happened to the Semantic Web? (2) 13  Data publishing (finally) starts to take off 1. Linked Open Data • Opening up existing data sets • Encyclopedic, scientific and government data • see linkeddata.org and the LDOW workshop 1. Metadata in HTML • Annotating existing HTML pages • Driven by search engine applications • see schema.org and applications at Bing/Yahoo/Google/Yandex  But not much social data…
  14. 14. 14 What happened to the Social Web?
  15. 15. What happened to the Social Web? Post-2004  “Web 2.0”: commercial interests in social data lead to silos › Data portability possible (e.g. Google’s Takeout), but no interlinking.  New social networks still arise › Special purpose (dating, health) or just fresh new ground (Snapchat) › Enterprise, e.g. Yammer Alice’s profile Bob’s profile Charlie’s profilefollows follows internally link to Facebook Alice’s profile Bob’s profile Charlie’s profilefollows follows internally link to Twitter Alice’s profile Bob’s profile Charlie’s profilefollowsfollows internally link to Alice’s profile Bob’s profile Charlie’s profile follows follows internally link to Alice’s profile Bob’s profile Charlie’s profilefollows follows internally link to
  16. 16. What happened to the Social-Semantic Web? 16  Representations › Profile data and content • FOAF (Friend-of-a-Friend) ontology (2000) for profile information • SIOC (Semantically Interlinked Online communities) ontology (2004) for blogs, forums, Q&A sites › Activities/actions • ActivityStreams 2.0 • schema.org Actions vocabulary  Missing building blocks for decentralized OSNs come from elsewhere › Distributed authentication (OpenID) & authorization (Oauth) › Alternatives based on Semantic Web principles come late (but not too late?) • WebID and WebID + TLS • SoLiD: Social Linked Data platform
  17. 17. What is left of our hopes for the Social-Semantic Web? 17  Connect digital identities across networks (sameAs) › One-off interlinking between systems, e.g. link your Facebook to your Yahoo account  Connect distributed conversations across networks › Limited solutions, e.g. hashtag directories such as  Having a profile in one network, and linking it to content elsewhere › Not possible  Fine-grained access control through existing web protocols › Not possible  Competition in services, e.g. search over social content › Non-existent despite early experiments (foaf-search.net)
  18. 18. The work continues 18  W3C Social Activity › W3C Social Interest Group • Use cases TF • Vocabularies TF › W3C Social Web Working Group • An extensible transfer syntax for activities like status updates • An API for third-party social content embedding • Possibly a protocol for federation  W3C WebID Community Group
  19. 19. What happened to online social science? 19  Online social science is booming 1. Studies of online social phenomena • Qualitative – Digital ethnography, e.g. danah boyd’s work • Quantitative – Networks – Language/content 2. Validating existing social theory using online data 3. Predicting real world phenomena using online data  Still, mostly done by computer scientists › We failed to provide much support for social scientists in terms of either data or tooling
  20. 20. Challenges 20  Limited access to data and experimentation platforms › As a result, studies are still small-scale and one-off  Validation studies challenged by social scientists › Online not the same as real-world sociality  Studies don’t necessarily generalize across social sites or contexts › e.g. ‘we predict the next election using Twitter’-type studies have been questioned  Affordances and usage keeps changing over time › SNSs have become more media-centric, less profile-centric › See Ellison, Nicole and danah boyd. (2013). “Sociality through Social Network Sites.”
  21. 21. Final thoughts 21  Semantic Web technology › Too little, too late for the Social Web? Or can we still build a federated social web? • e.g. can initiatives such as FreedomBox take us back to the early Social Web?  Online Social Science › What more can we do with technology?
  22. 22. Q&A  Contact me › pmika@yahoo-inc.com › @pmika › http://www.slideshare.net/pmika/

×