The origins of american politics

Chapter 6
 What was Alexander Hamilton’s
program for dealing with national and
state debt?
 How did foreign policy issues divide
Americans?
 What issues led to the emergence of
political parties?
 As Treasury Secretary, Alexander Hamilton was responsible
for developing an economic program that would help repay
the huge debts incurred during the Revolution.
 In 1790, Congress approved Hamilton’s plan to allow the
federal government to take responsibility for debts
acquired by individual states.
 Southern states resisted this plan at first, since they did not
want to help pay back the loans owed by northern states.
However, Hamilton won southern support by promising to
locate the nation’s new capital in the South.
 By assuming states’ debt, the federal government indirectly
increased its strength. Since creditors now had an interest
in the United States, not just individual states, they would
help ensure that the new nation did not collapse.
 To raise money to pay off debts, Congress created a
tax on whiskey and a tariff, or a tax on imported
goods.
 Rather than pay off all debt at once, the United
States paid interest, an extra sum of money that
borrowers pay creditors in return for loans.
 Hamilton believed in a loose construction of the
Constitution. That is, he believed that the
government could take any action that the
Constitution did not forbid.
 Many Americans disliked Hamilton’s plan for the
national government to take over state loans,
viewing it as interference in state affairs. Many
also disliked Hamilton’s new taxes.
 Secretary of State Thomas Jefferson was
particularly opposed to Hamilton’s plans.
Jefferson favored a strict construction of the
Constitution, believing that the government
should not take any actions other than those
specifically called for in the Constitution.
 In western Pennsylvania and other frontier areas, many
people refused to pay the new tax on whiskey. In addition
to being a popular beverage, whiskey was one of the only
products made out of corn that farmers could transport to
market without having it spoil.
 The resulting Whiskey Rebellion followed in the tradition
of Shays’ Rebellion and protests against the Stamp Act.
Rebels closed courts and attacked tax collectors.
 President Washington and Secretary Hamilton saw the
Whiskey Rebellion as an opportunity to demonstrate the
power of the United States government. An army sent to
the Pittsburgh area soon dissolved the rebellion,
demonstrating the United States’ commitment to
enforcing its laws.
The Jeffersonian Republicans
 Two political parties began to emerge in the new
nation. A political party is a group of people who
seek to win elections and hold public office in
order to shape government policy and programs.
 The Federalists formed one of these parties. The
other, composed of critics of the Federalists, were
called Republicans or Democratic-Republicans
because they stood for a more democratic republic.
To avoid confusion, historians call them the
Jeffersonian Republicans.
The Election of 1796
 President Washington chose not to run for a third
term in 1796. With the nation politically divided, the
election of 1796 was close. The Federalists won a
narrow victory, making John Adams the second
President. Jefferson, who finished second in the
electoral vote race, became the new Vice President.
 In his Farewell Address of 1796, Washington drew on
his years of experience and offered advice for the
young nation in the years ahead. He warned against
competing political parties and advocated a foreign
policy of neutrality.
 What actions did John Adams take as
President?
 Why was the election of 1800 a turning
point?
 What was significant about the transfer of
power between parties in 1801?
 The Federalists took advantage of the war crisis to
push important new measures through Congress.
These included the Alien and Sedition Acts of
1798.
 Under the Alien Act, the President could imprison
or deport citizens of other countries living in the
United States.
 Under the Sedition Act, persons who wrote,
published, or said anything “false, scandalous, and
malicious” against the American government
could be fined or jailed.
 Jefferson, James Madison, and other Republicans
believed that the Sedition Act violated the
constitutional protection of freedom of speech.
 These men responded to the Alien and Sedition
Acts with the Virginia and Kentucky Resolutions.
The resolutions allowed these two states to nullify
federal laws which they felt were unconstitutional.
 Tensions between Federalists and Jeffersonian
Republicans continued to grow during the late
1790s.
 Jefferson won the popular vote but did not win a majority
in the electoral college. He tied with his vice presidential
running mate, Aaron Burr.
 As specified in the Constitution, the House of
Representatives voted to choose the President. Voting was
deadlocked until the House elected Jefferson on its thirty-
sixth ballot.
 Jefferson’s victory was aided by the support of his usual
nemesis Hamilton, who preferred Jefferson over Burr.
Jefferson took the oath of office on March 4, 1801, amid the
construction of the nation’s new capital.
 The Federalists peacefully stepped down and allowed the
Jeffersonian Republicans to take power. In doing so, they
proved that the American system of government was
receptive to peaceful transfers of power.
 Judiciary Acts - The Constitution did not fully
explain the organization or the role of the judicial
branch. Congress filled in the missing details with
the Judiciary Acts of 1789 and 1801. These acts
created a national court system headed by the
Supreme Court. The Supreme Court would settle
differences between state and federal laws.
 Just before he left office, Adams appointed judges
to federal courts who would be sympathetic to
Federalist views. The appointment of these
midnight judges angered Jefferson, who wanted to
appoint judges from his own party.
 The historic case of Marbury v. Madison arose when
Jefferson tried to deny the appointments of some midnight
judges. Chief Justice John Marshall ruled that it was against
the Constitution for the Supreme Court to order the
executive branch to let appointee William Marbury take his
judicial office.
 In this ruling, the Court established the power of judicial
review, in which courts decide whether or not laws are
constitutional. It also allows federal courts to review state
laws and state court decisions to make sure they are
constitutional. In this way, the Court plays an important
role in preserving the federal union
 When the French ruler Napoleon took over Spanish
land in the West, the French began demanding large
sums of money from American traders passing
through New Orleans. Jefferson sent James Monroe
and Robert Livingston to France to buy the city of New
Orleans.
 Napoleon offered not just New Orleans, but the entire
French claim of Louisiana instead. Monroe and
Livingston quickly offered $15 million for the Louisiana
Purchase. The purchase dramatically increased the
size of the United States and its national debt.
 Congress agreed to fund an expedition to explore the
Louisiana Purchase. The two-year-long Lewis and
Clark expedition was successful in filling in many of
the details of these vast lands.
 Many Americans, including members of Congress,
blamed the British for ongoing frontier violence
between Native Americans and white Americans.
 Anger toward Britain increased due to the British
practice of impressment, the act of forcing people into
military service. British ships regularly stopped
American ships at sea and removed men to serve in the
British navy.
 President James Madison called for war with Britain,
which Congress approved. The war that followed
became known as the War of 1812.
 In the summer of 1814, British troops entered Washington, D.C., and
started fires that consumed the city. From Washington, the British
moved on to Baltimore, where American forces turned them back.
Lawyer Francis Scott Key witnessed an all-night British bombardment
there and described it in “The Star-Spangled Banner.”
 New Englanders suffered tremendous losses in trade during the war. In
December 1814, they called a meeting known as the Hartford
Convention to consider leaving the nation. Instead, the convention
called for constitutional amendments to increase New England’s
political power.
 The War of 1812 officially ended on December 24, 1814, with the signing
of the Treaty of Ghent, which restored all old boundaries between the
United States and British territory in North America. The treaty did
not, however, resolve many of the issues that had caused the war, such
as the British practice of impressment.
 Before news of the treaty reached the United States, General Andrew
Jackson won a spectacular American victory against the British at the
Battle of New Orleans. The victory raised morale and allowed
Americans to end an unhappy war on a positive note.
 In 1819, Congress began debating the admission of the state
of Missouri to the United States. The basic issue at stake
was slavery.
 Several members of Congress from the North objected to
Missouri’s admission as a slave state, fearing that this
would upset the balance of free and slave states in the
South’s favor.
 A compromise known as the Missouri Compromise,
engineered by Henry Clay, resolved the issue. Under the
Missouri Compromise, Missouri would enter the United
States as a slave state, Maine would enter as a free state, and
all new states created above 360 30' N latitude (the
southern border of Missouri) would have to be free states.
 The economy soon improved, and politicians agreed to
avoid the difficult issue of slavery. However, the questions
raised by these issues would soon be impossible to ignore.
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The origins of american politics

  • 2.  What was Alexander Hamilton’s program for dealing with national and state debt?  How did foreign policy issues divide Americans?  What issues led to the emergence of political parties?
  • 3.  As Treasury Secretary, Alexander Hamilton was responsible for developing an economic program that would help repay the huge debts incurred during the Revolution.  In 1790, Congress approved Hamilton’s plan to allow the federal government to take responsibility for debts acquired by individual states.  Southern states resisted this plan at first, since they did not want to help pay back the loans owed by northern states. However, Hamilton won southern support by promising to locate the nation’s new capital in the South.  By assuming states’ debt, the federal government indirectly increased its strength. Since creditors now had an interest in the United States, not just individual states, they would help ensure that the new nation did not collapse.
  • 4.  To raise money to pay off debts, Congress created a tax on whiskey and a tariff, or a tax on imported goods.  Rather than pay off all debt at once, the United States paid interest, an extra sum of money that borrowers pay creditors in return for loans.  Hamilton believed in a loose construction of the Constitution. That is, he believed that the government could take any action that the Constitution did not forbid.
  • 5.  Many Americans disliked Hamilton’s plan for the national government to take over state loans, viewing it as interference in state affairs. Many also disliked Hamilton’s new taxes.  Secretary of State Thomas Jefferson was particularly opposed to Hamilton’s plans. Jefferson favored a strict construction of the Constitution, believing that the government should not take any actions other than those specifically called for in the Constitution.
  • 6.  In western Pennsylvania and other frontier areas, many people refused to pay the new tax on whiskey. In addition to being a popular beverage, whiskey was one of the only products made out of corn that farmers could transport to market without having it spoil.  The resulting Whiskey Rebellion followed in the tradition of Shays’ Rebellion and protests against the Stamp Act. Rebels closed courts and attacked tax collectors.  President Washington and Secretary Hamilton saw the Whiskey Rebellion as an opportunity to demonstrate the power of the United States government. An army sent to the Pittsburgh area soon dissolved the rebellion, demonstrating the United States’ commitment to enforcing its laws.
  • 7. The Jeffersonian Republicans  Two political parties began to emerge in the new nation. A political party is a group of people who seek to win elections and hold public office in order to shape government policy and programs.  The Federalists formed one of these parties. The other, composed of critics of the Federalists, were called Republicans or Democratic-Republicans because they stood for a more democratic republic. To avoid confusion, historians call them the Jeffersonian Republicans.
  • 8. The Election of 1796  President Washington chose not to run for a third term in 1796. With the nation politically divided, the election of 1796 was close. The Federalists won a narrow victory, making John Adams the second President. Jefferson, who finished second in the electoral vote race, became the new Vice President.  In his Farewell Address of 1796, Washington drew on his years of experience and offered advice for the young nation in the years ahead. He warned against competing political parties and advocated a foreign policy of neutrality.
  • 9.  What actions did John Adams take as President?  Why was the election of 1800 a turning point?  What was significant about the transfer of power between parties in 1801?
  • 10.  The Federalists took advantage of the war crisis to push important new measures through Congress. These included the Alien and Sedition Acts of 1798.  Under the Alien Act, the President could imprison or deport citizens of other countries living in the United States.  Under the Sedition Act, persons who wrote, published, or said anything “false, scandalous, and malicious” against the American government could be fined or jailed.
  • 11.  Jefferson, James Madison, and other Republicans believed that the Sedition Act violated the constitutional protection of freedom of speech.  These men responded to the Alien and Sedition Acts with the Virginia and Kentucky Resolutions. The resolutions allowed these two states to nullify federal laws which they felt were unconstitutional.  Tensions between Federalists and Jeffersonian Republicans continued to grow during the late 1790s.
  • 12.  Jefferson won the popular vote but did not win a majority in the electoral college. He tied with his vice presidential running mate, Aaron Burr.  As specified in the Constitution, the House of Representatives voted to choose the President. Voting was deadlocked until the House elected Jefferson on its thirty- sixth ballot.  Jefferson’s victory was aided by the support of his usual nemesis Hamilton, who preferred Jefferson over Burr. Jefferson took the oath of office on March 4, 1801, amid the construction of the nation’s new capital.  The Federalists peacefully stepped down and allowed the Jeffersonian Republicans to take power. In doing so, they proved that the American system of government was receptive to peaceful transfers of power.
  • 13.  Judiciary Acts - The Constitution did not fully explain the organization or the role of the judicial branch. Congress filled in the missing details with the Judiciary Acts of 1789 and 1801. These acts created a national court system headed by the Supreme Court. The Supreme Court would settle differences between state and federal laws.  Just before he left office, Adams appointed judges to federal courts who would be sympathetic to Federalist views. The appointment of these midnight judges angered Jefferson, who wanted to appoint judges from his own party.
  • 14.  The historic case of Marbury v. Madison arose when Jefferson tried to deny the appointments of some midnight judges. Chief Justice John Marshall ruled that it was against the Constitution for the Supreme Court to order the executive branch to let appointee William Marbury take his judicial office.  In this ruling, the Court established the power of judicial review, in which courts decide whether or not laws are constitutional. It also allows federal courts to review state laws and state court decisions to make sure they are constitutional. In this way, the Court plays an important role in preserving the federal union
  • 15.  When the French ruler Napoleon took over Spanish land in the West, the French began demanding large sums of money from American traders passing through New Orleans. Jefferson sent James Monroe and Robert Livingston to France to buy the city of New Orleans.  Napoleon offered not just New Orleans, but the entire French claim of Louisiana instead. Monroe and Livingston quickly offered $15 million for the Louisiana Purchase. The purchase dramatically increased the size of the United States and its national debt.  Congress agreed to fund an expedition to explore the Louisiana Purchase. The two-year-long Lewis and Clark expedition was successful in filling in many of the details of these vast lands.
  • 16.  Many Americans, including members of Congress, blamed the British for ongoing frontier violence between Native Americans and white Americans.  Anger toward Britain increased due to the British practice of impressment, the act of forcing people into military service. British ships regularly stopped American ships at sea and removed men to serve in the British navy.  President James Madison called for war with Britain, which Congress approved. The war that followed became known as the War of 1812.
  • 17.  In the summer of 1814, British troops entered Washington, D.C., and started fires that consumed the city. From Washington, the British moved on to Baltimore, where American forces turned them back. Lawyer Francis Scott Key witnessed an all-night British bombardment there and described it in “The Star-Spangled Banner.”  New Englanders suffered tremendous losses in trade during the war. In December 1814, they called a meeting known as the Hartford Convention to consider leaving the nation. Instead, the convention called for constitutional amendments to increase New England’s political power.  The War of 1812 officially ended on December 24, 1814, with the signing of the Treaty of Ghent, which restored all old boundaries between the United States and British territory in North America. The treaty did not, however, resolve many of the issues that had caused the war, such as the British practice of impressment.  Before news of the treaty reached the United States, General Andrew Jackson won a spectacular American victory against the British at the Battle of New Orleans. The victory raised morale and allowed Americans to end an unhappy war on a positive note.
  • 18.  In 1819, Congress began debating the admission of the state of Missouri to the United States. The basic issue at stake was slavery.  Several members of Congress from the North objected to Missouri’s admission as a slave state, fearing that this would upset the balance of free and slave states in the South’s favor.  A compromise known as the Missouri Compromise, engineered by Henry Clay, resolved the issue. Under the Missouri Compromise, Missouri would enter the United States as a slave state, Maine would enter as a free state, and all new states created above 360 30' N latitude (the southern border of Missouri) would have to be free states.  The economy soon improved, and politicians agreed to avoid the difficult issue of slavery. However, the questions raised by these issues would soon be impossible to ignore.