Diese Präsentation wurde erfolgreich gemeldet.
Wir verwenden Ihre LinkedIn Profilangaben und Informationen zu Ihren Aktivitäten, um Anzeigen zu personalisieren und Ihnen relevantere Inhalte anzuzeigen. Sie können Ihre Anzeigeneinstellungen jederzeit ändern.
Mercury Cyclone
Paul Katsus is an electric utility service consultant who works for a major Texas electric utility
company...
compression ratio of 10.6:1 and a 735-CFM Holley four-barrel carburetor. In February of 1969,
Mercury began offering the S...
Nächste SlideShare
Wird geladen in …5
×

Mercury Cyclone - by Paul Katsus

The Mercury Cyclone was a true muscle car that could go head to head with any muscle car of the sixties and seventies, especially when equipped with Super Cobra Jet Drag pack.

  • Als Erste(r) kommentieren

  • Gehören Sie zu den Ersten, denen das gefällt!

Mercury Cyclone - by Paul Katsus

  1. 1. Mercury Cyclone Paul Katsus is an electric utility service consultant who works for a major Texas electric utility company. Paul Katsus is not a car collector but does study and enjoys documenting sports cars and muscle cars. The Mercury Cyclone is one such car. When one thinks of muscle cars from the late sixties and seventies Mercury is usually not on their radar, but Mercury did contribute some interesting muscle cars to the era. In 1969, Mercury had a one year production run of the Cyclone CJ. This mid-sized muscle car was meant to compete with the Plymouth Road Runner and Dodge GTX. This Mercury Cyclone CJ package included the 428 Cobra Jet engine which came standard with dual exhausts, a close-ratio four-speed manual transmission and a 3.50:1 rear-axle ratio, along with a Competition Handling Package. The Cyclone offered various performance axle ratios of up to 4.30:1 which helped to make the car an alternative to some of the fastest muscle cars of the day. Car magazines of the time period reported ¼ mile times of less than 14 seconds with speeds of over 100 MPH with the 428-cu.-in. V-8. The Mercury Cyclone CJ was had the muscle to really take the competition to the street and compete head to head with the benchmark Hemi models from Chrysler. Mercury sold just 2,175 CJs in the 1969 model year. In 1969 you could equip a non-CJ Cyclone with the same go-fast parts as the Cyclone CJ, including the 428 Cobra Jet engines that the model drew its name from. Although Ford officially rated the CJ at 335hp and 440-lbs.feet of torque, this number was generally regarded as underrated for insurance purposes. The Cobra Jet engine featured a high
  2. 2. compression ratio of 10.6:1 and a 735-CFM Holley four-barrel carburetor. In February of 1969, Mercury began offering the Super Cobra Jet engine option as part of the Drag-Pak, which included either a 3:91 or 4:30 rear axle. Super Cobra Jet engines were rated at the same 335hp as the CJ but, just as the Cobra Jet that number was seriously under rated. Many experts at the time put the more accurate horsepower around the 400 mark. The SCJ came with an uprated engines oil cooler and stronger crankshaft and connecting rods. Instead of the standard two bolt mains on the Cobra Jet, the SCJ came with four-bolt mains. . In another indication of the underrating of horsepower at the time, the performance-enhancing ram-air induction option did not any gain on the factory's horsepower rating. The ram air option came with cast-aluminum rocker covers (non-ram air models came with chrome rocker covers), as well as a hood scoop that forced air into a modified air cleaner with a gasket around the air cleaner. The engine VIN codes will not tell you if a car had a CJ or SCJ engine, but they would reveal if the car was equipped with ram air option. The rare ram air-equipped cars got an R code in the VIN number, while regular CJ 428s had a Q code in the vin number. The Super Cobra Jet option was a rare option with just 358 1969 Cyclone SCJ’s equipped with the 428 Super Cobra Jet engine. Paul Katsus would rate the 1969 Cyclone as among one of the most collectable of all Mercury’s.

×