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Tech Competency Institute for College Student Educators

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Originally presented at the 2016 Convention of ACPA--College Student Educators International in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. This institute provided an overview of the ACPA/NASPA Technology Competency as well as information about the themes present within it.

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Tech Competency Institute for College Student Educators

  1. SocialandDigital Technology CompetencyInstitute for College Student Educators with JosieAhlquist, Paul Brown, Ed Cabellon, Tony Doody, and Laura Pasquini #ACPA16 Sunday, March 6, 2016
  2. Introduction
  3. HistoryofSAtech& ImplementationModel
  4. Technology Competency Overview
  5. Figure 1. Visual Representation of the Intersection of the 10 Competency Areas
  6. Overview of the Competency Areas Competency Area Description Professional Development Technology (TECH) Focuses on the use of digital tools, resources, and technologies for the advancement of student learning, development, and success as well as the improved performance of student affairs professionals. Included within this area are knowledge, skills, and dispositions that lead to the generation of digital literacy and digital citizenship within communities of students, student affairs professionals, faculty members, and colleges and universities as a whole. Professional growth in this competency area is marked by shifts from understanding to application as well as from application to facilitation and leadership. Intermediate and advanced level outcomes also involve a higher degree of innovativeness in the use of technology to engage students and others in learning processes. Advising and Addresses the knowledge, skills, and dispositions related to providing advising and support to individuals and groups through direction, feedback, critique, referral, and guidance. Through Progression from foundational to advanced level proficiency involves the development of higher order
  7. ACPA—College Student Educators International & NASPA—Student Affairs Administrators in Higher Education 33 COMPREHENSIVE PRESENTATION OF THE COMPETENCY AREAS The Technology competency area focuses on the use of digital tools, resources, and technologies for the advancement of student learning, development, and success as well as the improved performance of student affairs professionals. Included within this area are knowledge, skills, and dispositions that lead to the generation of digital literacy and digital citizenship within communities of students, student affairs professionals, faculty members, and colleges and universities. • Model and promote equitable and inclusive practices by ensuring all participants in educational endeavors can access and utilize the necessary tools for success. • Appropriately utilize social media and other digital communication and collaboration tools to market and promote advising, programming, and other learning-focused interventions and to engage students in these activities. • Engage in personal and professional digital learning communities and personal learning networks at the local, national, and/or global level. • Design, implement, and assess technologically-rich learning experiences for students and other stakeholders that model effective use of visual and interactive media. • Ensure that one’s educational work with and service to students is inclusive of students participating in online and hybrid format courses and programs. • Incorporate commonly utilized technological tools and platforms including social medial and other digital communication and collaboration tools into one’s work. Technology (TECH) Foundational Outcomes • Demonstrate adaptability in the face of fast- paced technological change. • Remain current on student and educator adoption patterns of new technologies and familiarize oneself with the purpose and functionality of those technologies. • Troubleshoot basic software, hardware, and connectivity problems and refer more complex problems to an appropriate information technology administrator. • Draw upon research, trend data, and environmental scanning to assess the technological readiness and needs of students, colleagues, and other educational stakeholders when infusing technology into educational programs and interventions. • Critically assess the accuracy and quality of information gathered via technology and accurately cite electronic sources of information respecting copyright law and fair use. • Model and promote the legal, ethical, and transparent collection, use, and securing of electronic data. • Ensure compliance with accessible technology laws and policies. • Demonstrate awareness of one’s digital identity and engage students in learning activities related to responsible digital communications and virtual community engagement as related to their digital reputation and identity. 34 Professional Competency Areas for Student Affairs Educators COMPREHENSIVE PRESENTATION OF THE COMPETENCY AREAS • Proactively cultivate a digital identity, presence, and reputation for one’s self and by students that models appropriate online behavior and positive engagement with others in virtual communities. • Demonstrate a willingness and capacity to generate, critically examine, and change technology-related policies and practices that privilege one group of students or educational stakeholders over another. • Design and assess outcomes that utilize social media and other digital communication and collaboration tools for promoting learning- focused interventions and engaging students in these activities. • Utilize local, national, and global digital professional learning communities and personal learning networks to enhance intra- and inter-institutional collaboration and ongoing professional development in educational, customer service, marketing, and community engagement efforts that reflect the mission and values of the organization. • Generate a wide and varied array of digital strategies for enhancing educational interventions with multimedia, interactive tools, and creativity-enhancing technologies. • Initiate the development of holistic educational interventions designed for students participating in courses and other educational experiences delivered via hybrid and online formats. Intermediate Outcomes • Model and promote adaptability among students, colleagues, and educational stakeholders in the face of fast-paced technological change and demonstrate openness to the introduction of new digital tools by others. • Anticipate potential problems with software, hardware, and connectivity and prepare multiple strategies to troubleshoot these problems and/or prepare alternative means of achieving learning and productivity outcomes. • Facilitate educational interventions that are based upon research, trend data, and needs assessments of participants and that increase the technological competencies and digital literacy of those participants. • Utilize multiple strategies for accessing and assessing information, critically considering the sources of information as well as the purposes or agendas that led to the dissemination of the data as presented. • Teach and facilitate the legal and ethical use of digital information in a manner that complies with law and policy and that addresses the larger values and principles underlying these laws and policies. • Draw upon universal design principles to model and promote compliance with accessibility laws and policies among students, colleagues, and educational partners. Technology (TECH) (cont.)
  8. #SAtech Competency Themes Grouping the foundational, intermediate, and advanced outcomes for the Student Affairs TECH competency.
  9. 1. Trends, Research, and Knowledge Development • Draw upon research, trend data, and environmental scanning to assess the technological readiness and needs of students, colleagues, and other educational stakeholders when infusing technology into educational programs and interventions.** • Remain current on student and educator adoption patterns of new technologies and familiarize oneself with the purpose and functionality of those technologies. • Demonstrate a willingness and capacity to generate, critically examine, and change technology-related policies and practices that privilege one group of students or educational stakeholders over another.** • Anticipate technological change and allocate personal, departmental, and/or institutional resources to foster in others dispositions of adaptability, flexibility, and openness to technological innovation. • Contribute to the generation of research, trend analyses, and needs assessments related to digital technologies that inform efforts to meet the technological needs of students, colleagues, and educational stakeholders.**
  10. ACPA Digital Task Force http://digitaltaskforce.myacpa.org/
  11. 2. Leadership, Governance, and Stewardship • Demonstrate a willingness and capacity to generate, critically examine, and change technology-related policies and practices that privilege one group of students or educational stakeholders over another.** • Develop contingency plans for the continual operation of basic college and university functions in the event of software, hardware, or connectivity failures as a result of routine issues or in response to crises and emergencies.** • Provide leadership that demands digital information and technologies be used in a manner that is ethical and in full compliance with national and state/province laws as well as with institutional policies. • Lead and demonstrate a commitment to universal design principles in technological implementations that ensures the frictionless use and application of technology by all.** • Contribute to, partner with, and/or provide leadership for local, state/provincial, national, and global digital professional learning communities and personal learning networks in promoting the use of technology for educational purposes.
  12. What are your desired results for your campus? Fear Behavior Control
  13. 3. Assessment and Implementation for Education & Program Planning • Draw upon research, trend data, and environmental scanning to assess the technological readiness and needs of students, colleagues, and other educational stakeholders when infusing technology into educational programs and interventions.** • Design, implement, and assess technologically rich learning experiences for students and other stakeholders that model effective use of visual and interactive media. • Ensure that one’s educational work with and service to students is inclusive of students participating in online and hybrid format courses and programs. ** • Facilitate educational interventions that are based upon research, trend data, and needs assessments of participants and that increase the technological competencies and digital literacy of those participants. • Design and assess outcomes that utilize social media and other digital communication and collaboration tools for promoting learning focused interventions and engaging students in these activities. • Generate a wide and varied array of digital strategies for enhancing educational interventions with multimedia, interactive tools, and creativity-enhancing technologies. • Initiate the development of holistic educational interventions designed for students participating in courses and other educational experiences delivered via hybrid and online formats.**
  14. 3. Assessment and Implementation for Education & Program Planning (con’t) • Provide leadership for the proactive creation, use, and empirical evaluation of technological tools and digital spaces for students including those drawing on social media and other digital communication and collaboration tools.** • Contribute to the generation of research, trend analyses, and needs assessments related to digital technologies that inform efforts to meet the technological needs of students, colleagues, and educational stakeholders.** • Collaborate with and support faculty by developing holistic educational and co- curricular opportunities for students in online and hybrid programs promoting the relevance and vision of what student affairs practice in new educational delivery formats. • Provide leadership in the development of new means of leveraging technology for assessing, certifying, and credentialing the holistic learning and development of students through co curricular learning endeavors.
  15. Which Campus Stakeholders Might Support Your Planning? Faculty Staff Students IT Library Tutoring Advising Instruc9onal support Social media influencers Dept/College Admin HR &Legal University Records Registrar Financial Aid Governance External Partners
  16. (Kotter, 2007)! “Why are we on screen so much?”! Culture vs. Strategy and Change! “But we’ve always done it this way…”! Connect SA tech to the campus strategy.! Find champions at your campus!!
  17. 4. Information Literacy and Management • Critically assess the accuracy and quality of information gathered via technology and accurately cite electronic sources of information respecting copyright law and fair use. • Demonstrate awareness of one’s digital identity and engage students in learning activities related to responsible digital communications and virtual community engagement as related to their digital reputation and identity.** • Engage in personal and professional digital learning communities and personal learning networks at the local, national, and/or global level. • Model and promote the legal, ethical, and transparent collection, use, and securing of electronic data. • Utilize multiple strategies for accessing and assessing information, critically considering the sources of information as well as the purposes or agendas that led to the dissemination of the data as presented. • Teach and facilitate the legal and ethical use of digital information in a manner that complies with law and policy and that addresses the larger values and principles underlying these laws and policies. • Support, promote, and/or lead efforts to create a culture in which information is both valued and systematically scrutinized prior to its use to inform educational practice.
  18. Information Literacy Competency in Higher Ed "recognize when information is needed and have the ability to locate, evaluate, and use effectively the needed information." ~ American Library Association • Authority Is Constructed and Contextual • Information Creation as a Process • Information Has Value • Research as Inquiry • Scholarship as Conversation • Searching as Strategic Exploration
  19. via @Jisc
  20. 5. Applied Skills for Using Technology • Demonstrate adaptability in the face of fast-paced technological change. • Troubleshoot basic software, hardware, and connectivity problems and refer more complex problems to an appropriate information technology administrator. • Anticipate potential problems with software, hardware, and connectivity and prepare multiple strategies to troubleshoot these problems and/or prepare alternative means of achieving learning and productivity outcomes. • Develop contingency plans for the continual operation of basic college and university functions in the event of software, hardware, or connectivity failures as a result of routine issues or in response to crises and emergencies.**
  21. • Able to troubleshoot technology issues • Response to crisis & emergency situations • Administration of software/hardware applications
  22. 6. Inclusion and Access • Demonstrate awareness of one’s digital identity and engage students in learning activities related to responsible digital communications and virtual community engagement as related to their digital reputation and identity.** • Draw upon universal design principles to model and promote compliance with accessibility laws and policies among students, colleagues, and educational partners. • Initiate the development of holistic educational interventions designed for students participating in courses and other educational experiences delivered via hybrid and online formats.** • Lead and demonstrate a commitment to universal design principles in technological implementations that ensures the frictionless use and application of technology by all. • Engage in systematic practices aimed at ensuring students and professionals across all demographics have access to technological resources and are educated in their intelligent use and implementation for solving problems and enhancing learning.**
  23. How does your SA group support technology access? • Universal Design • Accessibility • Compliance • Accommodations • Considerations • Legal Requirements
  24. 7. Learning and Professional Development • Demonstrate awareness of one’s digital identity and engage students in learning activities related to responsible digital communications and virtual community engagement as related to their digital reputation and identity.** • Model and promote adaptability among students, colleagues, and educational stakeholders in the face of fast-paced technological change and demonstrate openness to the introduction of new digital tools by others. • Proactively cultivate a digital identity, presence, and reputation for one’s self and by students that models appropriate online behavior and positive engagement with others in virtual communities. • Utilize local, national, and global digital professional learning communities and personal learning networks to enhance intra- and inter-institutional collaboration and ongoing professional development in educational, customer service, marketing, and community engagement efforts that reflect the mission and values of the organization.
  25. 7. Learning and Professional Development (con’t) • Provide leadership for the proactive creation, use, and empirical evaluation of technological tools and digital spaces for students including those drawing on social media and other digital communication and collaboration tools.** • Provide leadership and ongoing training to colleagues and students for the cultivation of a genuine digital identity, presence, and reputation that models appropriate online behavior and enables open access and engagement with virtual communities as appropriate. • Engage in systematic practices aimed at ensuring students and professionals across all demographics have access to technological resources and are educated in their intelligent use and implementation for solving problems and enhancing learning. • Provide training and instruction for the use, adoption, and evaluation of digital strategies for enhancing educational interventions with multimedia, interactive tools, and creativity enhancing technologies by students, colleagues, and other educational stakeholders.
  26. 8. Communication and Collaboration • Appropriately utilize social media and other digital communication and collaboration tools to market and promote advising, programming, and other learning-focused interventions and to engage students in these activities. • Incorporate commonly utilized technological tools and platforms including social media and other digital communication and collaboration tools into one’s work. • Provide leadership for the seamless integration of social media and other digital communications with broader educational, customer service, marketing, and community engagement efforts that communicate and develop dialogue and community around shared common institutional values.
  27. • Communication Strategy • Community Engagement • Collaboration Efforts • Marketing & Promotion • Campus Interventions
  28. #SAtech Competency Themes 1. Trends, Research, and Knowledge Development 2. Leadership, Governance, and Stewardship 3. Assessment and Implementation for Education and Program Planning 4. Information Literacy and Management 5. Applied Skills for Using Technology 6. Inclusion and Access 7. Learning and Professional Development 8. Communication and Collaboration
  29. #SAtech Competency Reflection What’s your individual perspective?
  30. #SAtech Competency: Assessment @ Your Campus • Who is part of this assessment team? • How does it tie into your current division learning outcomes and goals? • How will this connect to strategic planning at your institution? • How will you engage campus stakeholders (e.g. students, staff, faculty, alumni) in the assessment process?
  31. BREAK
  32. QuickTakes
  33. Leadership Governance &Stewardship
  34. Sociotechnical Stewardship- Management, Policy, Governance,& Guidelines with Laura…
  35. WANTED: Policy & Regulation
  36. 17,429 1071 13 3771 314 1121 189 109 160 62 # of social media passages www.socialmediaguidance.wordpress.com 250 policy documents
  37. (Pasquini & Evangelopoulos, 2015) Policy Reference & Starting Point
  38. (Pasquini & Evangelopoulos, 2016) Framework for Campus Planning
  39. Sociotechnical Stewardship #1 •  Who are your institutional stakeholders? •  In designing standards, who should be at table to represent your community? – Advisory Group or Council – Institutional Mandates/Requirements – Identity Management
  40. Sociotechnical Stewardship #2 •  What regulations and rules already exist at your campus? •  What protocols need to be updated? •  How will you develop standards for all institutional stakeholders? – Policies – Protocols – Implications
  41. Sociotechnical Stewardship #3 •  Consult your campus attorney for legal advice •  Considerations under your institutions’ requirements: – Risk Management – Human Resources – Security Compliance – Federal/Local Legislation – Copyright & Fair Use
  42. Sociotechnical Stewardship #4 •  How will you measure and assess progress? •  Consider ways to share: – Share data – Support analytics & ROI – Develop a repository – Create a directory – Sustain technical tools & systems
  43. Sociotechnical Stewardship #5 •  Learning, development & training will be key •  How will you share best practices to guide use? •  Plan to include: – Accessibility guidelines – A glossary of terms – Suggested models/examples – Local support/help
  44. Sociotechnical Stewardship #6 •  Involve your campus stakeholders in this process •  Think about how you want to develop and support your community, in terms of: – Target audiences – Engagement on platforms – Respect for other – Responsibility & ownership
  45. (Pasquini & Evangelopoulos, 2016)
  46. DigitalDecisionMaking ModelinSA with Josie…
  47. How are Deans and Vice Presidents using social media?
  48. Digital Decision Making Model Who How What Why Ahlquist, J. (2014)
  49. Digital Decision Making Model Digital Tools & Strategy User Engagement Digital Contribution Intended Purpose Ahlquist, J. (2014) Who WhyWhat How
  50. Digital Decision Making Model Twitter Student Engagement Contribute as Whole Self Strengthen Relationships & Communication Ahlquist, J. (2014) Who WhyWhat/Where How
  51. You have my permission to Accept a Facebook request Interact on Twitter Instagram Follow with Students
  52. Value Added Approach to Social Media Use
  53. Bring your whole self
  54. Be the kind of educator students want to take selfies with @josieahlquist www.josieahlquist.com
  55. How do you make decisions about using social media? (students, staff, family, friends) #ACPA16
  56. Assessment& Implementation forProgramPlanning
  57. TechnologySelectionfor YourLearners& Colleagues with Laura…
  58. From Kindergarten to Ph.D. – Learning is my “thing”
  59. 23
  60. Learning + Technology Development Process Model (Hibbitts & Travin, 2015)
  61. SECTIONS Model • Students (or Stakeholders) • Ease of use • Costs • Teaching or Education functions (affordances of different media) • Interactions • Organizational Issues • Networking • Security and privacy consideration (Bates, 2015)
  62. Learning Service Engagement Establish intentional learning outcomes that can be delivered in different mediums & modes. Provide service learning and experiential opportunities. Use of tools to inform and build communities among both your campus stakeholders (not just your students). Purpose in Your Educational Planning
  63. #ugstSTORY
  64. 5 Critical SA Tech Questions 1. Who are your stakeholders (e.g. students, staff, & faculty)? 2. What are the desired learning outcomes or objectives from your division or program planning? 3. What strategies will be employed to facilitate these learning outcomes or objectives? 4. What are the unique educational characteristics of each medium/technology, and how well do these match the your divisional goals or program requirements? 5. What resources are available at your campus? Download: Selecting Technology for Learning Checklist (Pasquini, 2015)
  65. UsingDatatoInform Decisions with Tony…
  66. Information Literacyand Management
  67. DigitizedStudent DevelopmentTheory with Paul…
  68. MarciaBaxterMagolda’s TheoryofSelf-Authorship
  69. Student explores and experiments openly with social media. This is strongly influenced by authorities (parents/guardians) through access and peers through peer culture. Student does not understand how online and offline interactions can impact each other or possess a sophisticated understanding of context. Student makes conscious choices about social media usage and how it fits into life desires, outlook, and goals. Student realizes that one’s online life requires constant renegotiation as one’s goals, needs, contexts, and circumstances change.
  70. DigitalStudent LeadershipCurriculum with Josie…
  71. Digital Identity “Demonstrate awareness of one’s digital identity and engage students in learning activities related to responsible digital communications and virtual community engagement as related to their digital reputation and identity.”
  72. Digital Education Digital Identity Digital Tools Virtual Communi ty Engagem ent Digital Reputatio n
  73. Leadership in the Digital Age #LDR2116
  74. Check-up on your Social Media Status
  75. What do you want to go viral for?
  76. Your Digital Identity
  77. Digital Wellness
  78. Digital Decisions as a College Student
  79. Digital Branding for professional reputation
  80. Who are your Role Models for Digital Behavior?
  81. Digital Leadership On campus
  82. Make Positivity Go Viral
  83. Now Define your digital stamp “Providing a digital remix to empower leaders of the 21st century”
  84. Collaboration Common Purpose Controversy with Civility Citizenship Consciousness of self Congruence Commitment Social Change Model Individual Values G r o u p Va l u e s Community Values Change
  85. What would be your final tweet? Forever
  86. This semester what is one way you can teach students about digital identity? #acpa16
  87. Self-Esteemand Authenticityon SocialMedia with Paul…
  88. Pursuitof Likes
  89. “Thatnumberinitself doesn’tmeananything unlessyoucompareitto otherposts.” -Addie
  90. “Thenyougetinthatwhole thingwherepeoplestart comparingthemselvesto otherpeople.Thatreallyisn’t thebestroutetogodown.” Addie “You’rethinkingaboutit toomuch.”
  91. Selective Viewof Reality
  92. IMAGE: CHOMPOO BARITONE Consuming Perfected Images
  93. “Yeahit’sexhausting… it’swhatcausesmyunhappiness… thecomparisonsgetsointense… IfeellikeI’mjustaconstantfailure” -Logan
  94. AppliedSkills forUsing Technology
  95. DigitalDesign with Paul…
  96. Tell A Story
  97. Keep it Simple
  98. Use Video
  99. High Quality Images
  100. ProducingandUsing Video with Ed…
  101. Learningand Professional Development
  102. #SAproDigital Reputationand PersonalLearning Networks with Josie…
  103. #SApro Digital Reputation @josieahlquist #acpa16 And Personal Learning Networks
  104. Digital Reputation is your reputation
  105. 1. Bio 2. Headshot 3. Claim your name 4. Google yourself (now)
  106. Digital Reputation Mentors
  107. Personal Learning Networks “Engage in personal and professional digital learning communities and personal learning networks at the local, national, and/or global level.”
  108. #sachat #satech #edtech #digitaled #edusocmedia #Casesmc #emchat #fachat #salead #SLchat #WLsalt #sagrad #sadoc #sapro #safit #sareads
  109. NASPA ASHE ACUI AIMHO ACPA NACA ACUHO-I Inside Higher Ed LinkedIn Groups NASPA ASHE ACUI AIMHO ACPA NACA ACUHO-I Inside Higher Ed
  110. #SaPro Tip yourself(professionally) Define(brand) online(Twitter & LinkedIn) @josieahlquist
  111. Blogging
  112. Student Affairs Collective The Student Affairs Feature Student Affairs Women Talk Tech Student Affairs Fitness Student Leader Collective Student Affairs - The First Years
  113. www.josieahlquist.com
  114. HigherEdTech&SocialMediaBloggers Eric Qualman: www.socialnomics.net Ed Cabellon: edcabellon.com Joe Sabado: joesabado.com Kristin Abell: savedbyabell.com Laura Pasquini: techknowtools.wordpress.com Liz Gross: lizgross.net Paul Gordon Brown: paulgordonbrown.com
  115. Produce Sharable Content
  116. Digital Reputation is your reputation
  117. • The Admin: A Place for Student Affairs Professionals • Student Affairs Professionals • Leadership Educators in Higher Education • NASPA Technology Knowledge Community • Student Affairs Professional Development • Student Activities Professionals • ACPA Grow • Student Affairs Runners • Student Affairs Faculty • Women in Housing • Student Affairs Graduate Students Facebook Groups
  118. Higher Ed Live Student Affairs Live Higher Education Student Affairs Chat Edtech Social Media – Higher Ed SAlead Technology in Student Affairs
  119. What is one personal learning network you can commit to? #acpa16
  120. TechnologyGuidance andPolicyDocuments with Ed…
  121. DigitalLearning Communities with Tony…
  122. Inclusion andAccess
  123. UniversalDesign& Accessibility with Laura…
  124. The goal is to maximize learning with a wide range of characteristics by applying UD principles to all aspects of learning (e.g. delivery methods for learning, physical spaces, information resources, technology, personal interactions, assessments, etc.) (DO-IT, University of Washington, 2016)
  125. Principles of Universal Design (UD) 1. Equitable Use 2. Flexibility in Use 3. Simple and Intuitive Use 4. Perceptible Information 5. Tolerance for Error 6. Low Physical Effort 7. Size and Space for Approach and Use Copyright 1997 NC State University, The Center for Universal Design
  126. Considerations for #SAtech Support & Resources Flickr image c/o Giulia Forsythe
  127. How does your SA group support technology access? • Universal Design • Accessibility • Compliance • Accommodations • Considerations • Legal Requirements
  128. Accessibility & UD Resources On Campus • Who or what department supports this at your institution? • What examples are available for you to follow? • Where can you learn more about your UD & accessibility compliance? • Have you conducted an audit of your SA program and resources to ensure access?
  129. Communication &Collaboration
  130. CrisisCommunication with Tony…
  131. CHANNELS TEXT
 MESSAGE EMAIL VOICEMAIL SoMe DIRECT MESSAGE LIVE
 PHONE DIRECT
 MAIL SOCIAL MEDIA CHAT
  132. IntegratedMarketing& CommunicationTeams with Ed…
  133. CollaborationTools with Tony…
  134. DivisionalDigital TechnologyCommittees with Ed…
  135. Trends,Research, andKnowledge Development
  136. DigitalStudentActivism andEngagement with Paul…
  137. Social Media and Civic Engagement: Takeaways Social Media: • Drives Civic Learning & Organizing • Allows for Fast, Customized Information Gathering • Facilitates Sharing of Information But it Also: • May Lead to an Avoidance of Civil Debate • Create an Intimidating Environment for Students Engaged in Early-Stage Cognitive & Identity Development @AdamGismondi
  138. Social Media and Student Activism: Takeaways • Removes/Lessens Barriers to Entry • Serves as a Tool for Organizing/Mobilizing • Serves as a Conduit for Information Dissemination/ Consumption • Allows for Iterations & Development of a Shared Language (“The 1%,” “#BlackLivesMatter,” etc.) Across recent student activist movements (Occupy Wall Street, Quebec Tuition Protests, Black Lives Matter), social media: @AdamGismondi
  139. Social Media and Student Activism: Concerns to Consider • Activism Derives from Issues & Social Forces • Social Media Accelerates & Expands Movements • What Happens When a Leaderless Movement Succeeds? • New vs. Traditional Forces (Who Represents Students that “Make it to the table?”) • Clicktivism? • How Do We Define Meaningful Participation? @AdamGismondi
  140. Questions for Student Affairs Practice • How does our “traditional” mode of Registered/ Recognized Student Organizations fit with modern movements? • Does the “traditional” model fit? Is that important? • How might these new tools for activism interact with typical structures within Student Affairs? • Should we adapt? Can we adapt? @AdamGismondi
  141. Openness: OpenEducation Resources,Open Practices&Creative Commons with Laura…
  142. What does OPEN mean to you? [Hint: It’s not just digital.]
  143. The Digital Scholar Movement Mar3n Weller a.k.a. @mweller … The Ed Techie
  144. Why Open Practice in SA? The Arguments for Open in SA: 1. To not be left behind. 2. The benefits of being open. 3. The need to understand this stuff. 4. If you don’t control it, someone else will. Why Open Practices and Open Knowledge via @mweller
  145. The Battle for the Open • Open Access - Publication & Research • Open Educational Resources (OER) • Massively Open Online Courses (MOOCs) • Open Scholarship (& Open Practice) “Openness is not just a peripheral interest now.” (Weller, 2014)
  146. Content Curation •Copyright •Fair Use •Creative Commons •Attribution More about Content Curation Flickr image c/o OpenSource.com
  147. Crea%ve Commons h-p://crea%vecommons.org/ OER Commons h-ps://www.oercommons.org/ Open Access @ UNT h-p://openaccess.unt.edu/
  148. Sharing IS Caring •Images/Photos •Resources to remix & reuse •Research & data •Evidence-based practices Flickr image c/o Ryan Roberts
  149. Forecastingand KeepingUpwith Platformsand Technologies with Josie…
  150. “Digital tools, resources, and technologies for the advancement of STUDENT • Learning • Development • Success Technology AND the improved performance of student affairs professionals.”
  151. “Included within this area are: knowledge, skills, and dispositions that lead to the generation of digital literacy and digital citizenship within communities of students, student affairs professionals, faculty members, and colleges & universities as a whole.” Technology
  152. Foundational • Digital Explorer Intermediate • Digital Educator Advanced • Digital Influencer
  153. Adapting to Technology Demonstrate adaptability in the face of fast-paced technological change. Be aware of adoption patterns of students and professionals, including understanding how those tools function.
  154. Evolution of Technology
  155. Know these applications
  156. Learn Explore Aware
  157. Josie’s Predictions
  158. •Visual content will rule every application •One streaming video app with real time interaction will increase in adoption/popularity •New apps will infuse trending news content •More private sharing options, mimicking Snapchat
  159. •Increase of social media engagement research and scholarship in education •University digital education and leadership programs •Student Affairs master's program infusion of  NASPA/ ACPA Tech competency 
  160. Concluding…

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