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Rhetorical analysis

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Rhetorical analysis

  1. 1. • Rhetoric is the study of how writers and speakers use words to influence an audience. A rhetorical analysis is an essay that breaks a work of non-fiction into parts and then explains how the parts work together to create a certain effect—whether to persuade, entertain or inform.• A rhetorical analysis should explore the rhetorician’s goals, the techniques used, examples of those techniques, and the effectiveness of those techniques. When writing a rhetorical analysis, you are NOT saying whether or not you agree with the argument. Instead, you’re discussing how the rhetorician makes that argument and whether or not the approach used is successful.
  2. 2. • Selecting a text • Look for works that you find impressive or somehow challenging; without over-extending yourself, selecting these slightly more complex texts can help you to create a truly engaging and interesting analysis.
  3. 3. • Scanning and Identifying • To begin your analysis, youll need to read the text with heightened attention and awareness. • As you read, scan the text for overarching rhetorical forms. • Identifying these broad rhetorical tendencies will help you see the authors intentions and the scope of the text. • Finally, identify the overall style of the text; note whether the author is formal or informal, scientific or conversational, terse or florid. Keep a thorough log of all your observations about the text.
  4. 4. • Hypothesis • Only once you have engaged with the text can you formulate an accurate hypothesis about its rhetorical structure and scope. • Synthesizing your notes on the texts rhetorical devices, style, form and intended audience, devise a theory about how the text achieves its thematic ends. • Expand on your basic hypothesis to answer such questions as how the various rhetorical devices interact and contribute to the overall effect of the work; how the author engages the intended audience and how the text fulfills any specific functions or posits any arguments.
  5. 5. • Rhetorical Elements • Writer • Message • Purpose • Intended audience • Context publication • Design • Rhetorical Effectiveness
  6. 6. • An appeal is an attempt to earn audience approval or agreement by playing to natural human tendencies or common experience. There are three kinds of appeals: the pathetic, the ethical, and the logical.
  7. 7. • Pathetic • invokes the audience’s emotion to gain acceptance and approval for the ideas expressed• Ethical • uses the writer’s own credibility and character to make a case and gain approval• Logical • uses reason to make a case
  8. 8. • In writing an effective rhetorical analysis, you should discuss the goal or purpose of the piece; the appeals, evidence, and techniques used and why; examples of those appeals, evidence, and techniques; and your explanation of why they did or didn’t work. A good place to start is to answer each of these considerations in a sentence or two on a scratch piece of paper. Don’t worry about how it sounds—just answer the questions.
  9. 9. • THESIS• INTRODUCTION • should lead cleanly into your argument • Remember that your argument begins with the first words of your paper. Your introduction should provide background that will make the reader see your argument’s relevance.• BODY OF THE ESSAY • should have its own topic sentence • Make sure every idea or sentence in a paragraph relates to its topic sentence.• CONCLUSION • should briefly restate your main argument • It should then apply your argument on a higher level.

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