Diese Präsentation wurde erfolgreich gemeldet.
Wir verwenden Ihre LinkedIn Profilangaben und Informationen zu Ihren Aktivitäten, um Anzeigen zu personalisieren und Ihnen relevantere Inhalte anzuzeigen. Sie können Ihre Anzeigeneinstellungen jederzeit ändern.

9

Teilen

Herunterladen, um offline zu lesen

Anatomy skull anatomy dr.mohammed

Herunterladen, um offline zu lesen

ophthalmology residency program

Ähnliche Bücher

Kostenlos mit einer 30-tägigen Testversion von Scribd

Alle anzeigen

Ähnliche Hörbücher

Kostenlos mit einer 30-tägigen Testversion von Scribd

Alle anzeigen

Anatomy skull anatomy dr.mohammed

  1. 1. Dr.mohammed muneer SKULL ANATOMY
  2. 2. Composition • The skull consists of a number of separate bones united at immobile joints called sutures. • The connective tissue between the bones is called a sutural ligament. • The skull bones are made up of external and internal tables of compact bone, separated by a layer of spongy bone called the diploe. The internal table is thinner and more brittle than the external table. • The bones are covered on the outer and inner surfaces with periosteum the outer layer is referred to as the pericranium the inner covering, as the endocranium.
  3. 3. CRANIUM • The vault is the upper part of the cranium • The base of the skull is the lower part of the cranium • The cranium consists of the following bones, 1. Frontal bone 2. Parietal bones 3. Occipital bone 4. Temporal bones 5. Sphenoid bone 6. Ethmoid bone FACE • The facial bones consist of the following, 1. Zygomatic bones 2. Maxillae 3. Nasal bones 4. Lacrimal bones 5. Vomer 6. Palatine bones 7. Inferior conchae 8. Mandible • The bones of the skull may be divided into those of the cranium and those of the face.
  4. 4. Anterior View • The frontal bone the upper margins of the orbits. • Medially, the frontal bone articulates with the frontal processes of the maxillae and with the nasal bones. • Laterally, articulates with the zygomatic bone. • The orbital margins are bounded by the 1. Superiorly frontal bone 2. Laterally the zygomatic bone 3. inferiorly The maxilla 4. medially The processes of the maxilla and frontal bone.
  5. 5. • Within the frontal bone there are two hollow spaces called the frontal air sinuses. • The two nasal bones form the bridge of the nose. • Their lower borders, with the maxillae, make the anterior nasal aperture. • The nasal cavity is divided into two parts by the bony nasal septum, which is largely formed by the vomer. • The superior and middle conchae jut into the nasal cavity from the ethmoid on each side The inferior conchae are separate bones.
  6. 6. • The two maxillae form the 1. upper jaw 2. the anterior part of the hard palate 3. part of the lateral walls of the nasal cavities 4. part of the floors of the orbital cavities. • These two bones meet in the midline at the intermaxillary suture and form the lower margin of the nasal aperture • The infraorbital foramen perforates the maxilla below the orbit. • The alveolar process projects downward and, together with the fellow of the opposite side, forms the alveolar arch, which carries the upper teeth. • Within each maxilla is a large pyramid-shaped cavity lined with mucous membrane, the maxillary sinus
  7. 7. • THE ZYGOMATIC BONE • forms the prominence of the cheek and part of the lateral wall and floor of the orbital cavity. • Medially, it articulates with the zygomatic process of the temporal bone to form the zygomatic arch. • The zygomatic bone is perforated by two foramina for the zygomaticofacial and zygomaticotemporal nerves. • THE MANDIBLE or lower jaw , • consists of a horizontal body and two vertical rami • The body joins the ramus at the angle of the mandible. • The mental foramen opens onto the anterior surface of the body of the mandible, below the second premolar tooth. • The upper border of the mandible, the alveolar part, carries the lower teeth.
  8. 8. LATERAL VIEW • The frontal bone forms the anterior part of the side of the skull and articulates with the parietal bone at the coronal suture . • The parietal bones form the sides and roof of the cranium and articulate with each other in the midline at the sagittal suture. They articulate with the occipital bone behind, at the lambdoid suture. • The skull is completed from the side by the 1. squamous part of the occipital bone 2. parts of the temporal bone, namely, the squamous, tympanic, mastoid process, styloid process 3. zygomatic process 4. the greater wing of the sphenoid. 5. The ramus and body of the mandible lie inferiorly.
  9. 9. • Pterion is the thinnest part of the lateral wall of the skull At pterion the anteroinferior corner of the parietal bone articulates with the greater wing of the sphenoid. On the outer surface of the skull, the pterion lies about 1 inch behind the frontal process of the zygomatic bone and about 1.5 inches above the zygomatic arch.  Clinically, the pterion is a very important area, because it overlies the anterior division of the middle meningeal artery and vein.
  10. 10. • The temporal fossa lies below the temporal lines. The lower limit of the temporal fossa is the infratemporal crest of the greater wing of the sphenoid, which is level with the upper border of the zygomatic arch. The infratemporal fossa lies below the infratemporal crest on the greater wing of the sphenoid. • The pterygomaxillary fissure is a vertical fissure that lies within the fossa between the pterygoid process of the sphenoid bone and back of the maxilla. It leads medially into the pterygopalatine fossa.
  11. 11. • The inferior orbital fissure is a horizontal fissure between the greater wing of the sphenoid bone and the maxilla. It leads forward into the orbit.
  12. 12. • The pterygopalatine fossa is a small space behind and below the orbital cavity. It communicates 1. Laterally with the infratemporal fossa through the pterygomaxillary fissure, 2. Medially with the nasal cavity through the sphenopalatine foramen, 3. Superiorly with the skull through the foramen rotundum, 4. Anteriorly with the orbit through the inferior orbital fissure.
  13. 13. POSTERIOR VIEW • The posterior parts of the two parietal bones with the intervening sagittal suture are seen above. • Below, the parietal bones articulate with the squamous part of the occipital bone at the lambdoid suture. • On each side the occipital bone articulates with the temporal bone. In the midline of the occipital bone is a roughened elevation called the external occipital protuberance, which gives attachment to muscles and to the ligamentum nuchae. • On either side of the protuberance the superior nuchal lines extend laterally toward the temporal bone.
  14. 14. SUPERIOR VIEW • Anteriorly the frontal bone articulates with the two parietal bones at the coronal suture. • Posteriorly the two parietal bones articulate in the midline at the sagittal suture. Occasionally, the two halves of the frontal bone fail to fuse, leaving a midline metopic suture.
  15. 15. INFERIOR VIEW • If the mandible is discarded, the anterior part of this aspect of the skull is seen to be formed by the hard palate. The palatal processes of the maxillae and the horizontal plates of the palatine bones can be identified. • In the midline anteriorly are the incisive fossa and foramen. Posterolaterally are the greater and lesser palatine foramina
  16. 16. • Above the posterior edge of the hard palate are the choanae (posterior nasal apertures). • These are separated from each other by the posterior margin of the vomer and are bounded laterally by the medial pterygoid plates of the sphenoid bone.
  17. 17. • Posterolateral to the lateral pterygoid plate, • the large foramen ovale • the small foramen spinosum pierce the greater wing of the sphenoid. • Posterolateral to the foramen spinosum is the spine of the sphenoid.
  18. 18. • The medial end of the petrous part of the temporal bone is irregular and, together with the basilar part of the occipital bone and the greater wing of the sphenoid, forms the foramen lacerum.
  19. 19. • In the interval between the styloid and mastoid processes, the stylomastoid foramen can be seen. • Medial to the styloid process, the petrous part of the temporal bone has a deep notch, which, together with a shallower notch on the occipital bone, forms the jugular foramen
  20. 20. • Behind the posterior apertures of the nose and in front of the foramen magnum are the sphenoid bone and the basilar part of the occipital bone. • The occipital condyles should be identified; they articulate with the superior aspect of the lateral mass of the atlas. • Posterior to the foramen magnum is the external occipital protuberance
  21. 21. CRANIAL CAVITY Base Of Skull Anterior C.F. Middle C.F. Posterior C.F. Vault of skull
  22. 22. Vault Of The Skull • The internal surface ofthe vault shows the coronal, sagittal, and lambdoid sutures. • In the midline a shallow sagittal groove lodges the superior sagittal sinus. On each side of this groove are a number of small pits, called granular pits, which lodge the lateral lacunae and arachnoid granulations. • A number of narrow grooves are present for the anterior and posterior divisions of the middle meningeal vessels as they pass up the side of the skull to the vault.
  23. 23. Anterior Cranial Fossa • The anterior cranial fossa lodges the frontal lobes of the cerebral hemispheres. • It is bounded anteriorly by the inner surface of the frontal bone • Its posterior boundary is the sharp lesser wing of the sphenoid, which articulates laterally with the frontal bone and meets the anterior inferior angle of the parietal bone (pterion). The medial end of the lesser wing of the sphenoid forms the anterior clinoid process on each side, to give attachment to the tentorium cerebelli. The median part of the anterior cranial fossa is limited posteriorly by the groove for the optic chiasma.
  24. 24. • The floor of the fossa is formed by the ridged orbital plates of the frontal bone laterally and by the cribriform plate of the ethmoid medially. • The crista galli is a sharp upward projection of the ethmoid bone in the midline, for the attachment of the falx cerebri. Alongside the crista galli is a narrow slit in the cribriform plate for the passage of the anterior ethmoidal nerve into the nasal cavity.
  25. 25. Middle Cranial Fossa • The middle cranial fossa consists of 1. small median part (The body of the sphenoid) 2. expanded lateral parts form concavities on either side, lodging the temporal lobes of the cerebral hemispheres. • The middle cranial fossa is bounded anteriorly by the lesser wings of the sphenoid posteriorly by the superior borders of the petrous parts of the temporal bones. Laterally lie the squamous parts of the temporal bones, the greater wings of the sphenoid, and the parietal bones. The floor of each lateral part of the middle cranial fossa is formed by the greater wing of the sphenoid and the squamous and petrous parts of the temporal bone.
  26. 26. 1. The optic canal transmits the optic nerve and the ophthalmic artery. 2. The superior orbital fissure,between the lesser and greater wings of the sphenoid, transmits the lacrimal, frontal, trochlear, oculomotor, nasociliary, and abducent nerves, together with the superior ophthalmic vein. 3. The sphenoparietal venous sinus runs medially along the posterior border of the lesser wing of the sphenoid and drains into the cavernous sinus 4. The foramen rotundum,perforates the greater wing of the sphenoid and transmits the maxillary nerve 5. The foramen ovale , It perforates the greater wing of the sphenoid and transmits the large sensory root and small motor root of the mandibular nerve to the infratemporal fossa 6. The small foramen, perforates the greater wing of the sphenoid, transmits the middle meningeal artery from the infratemporal fossa into the cranial cavity
  27. 27. 7. foramen lacerum lies between the apex of the petrous part of the temporal bone and the sphenoid bone 8. The carotid canal opens into the side of the foramen lacerum. The internal carotid artery enters the foramen through the carotid canal 9. . The anterior surface of the petrous bone has two grooves for nerves the larger, medial groove is for the greater petrosal nerve, a branch of the facial nerve the smaller, lateral groove is for the lesser petrosal nerve, a branch of the tympanic plexus.
  28. 28. • The median part of the middle cranial fossa is formed by the body of the sphenoid bone. • In front is the sulcus chiasmatis, which is related to the optic chiasma and leads laterally to the optic canal on each side. • Posterior to the sulcus is an elevation, the tuberculum sellae. Behind this elevation is a deep depression, the sella turcica, that lodges the hypophysis cerebri. The sella turcica is bounded posteriorly by a square plate of bone called the dorsum sellae. The superior angles of the dorsum sellae have two tubercles, called the posterior clinoid processes, which give attachment to the fixed margin ofthe tentorium cerebelli. The cavernous sinus is directly related to the side of the body of the sphenoid.
  29. 29. Posterior Cranial Fossa • The posterior cranial fossa is very deep and lodges the parts of the hindbrain, namely, the cerebellum, pons, and medulla oblongata. Anteriorly, the fossa is bounded by the superior border of the petrous part of the temporal bone posteriorly, by the internal surface of the squamous part of the occipital bone. The floor of the posterior fossa is formed by the basilar, condylar, and squamous parts ofthe occipital bone and the mastoid part of the temporal bone. The roof of the fossa is formed by a fold of dura, the tentorium cerebelli. • The foramen magnum occupies the central area of the floor and transmits the medulla oblongata and its surrounding meninges, the ascending spinal parts of the accessory nerves, and the two vertebral arteries.
  30. 30. 1. The hypoglossal canal, transmits the hypoglossal nerve. 2. The jugular foramen It transmits the following structures from front to back: a) the inferior petrosal sinus b) the ninth, tenth, and eleventh cranial nerves c) The large sigmoid sinus. 3. The internal acoustic meatus. It transmits the vestibulocochlear nerve and the motor and sensory roots of the facial nerve. 4. The internal occipital crest to it is attached the small falx cerebelli over the occipital sinus 5. On each side of the internal occipital protuberance there is a wide groove for the transverse sinus , when it reaches the mastoid part of temporal bone it becomes (sigmoid sinus )
  31. 31. Dura Mater Of The Brain The Endosteal Layer • Is nothing more than the ordinary periosteum covering the inner surface of the skull bones. It does not extend through the foramen magnum to become continuous with the dura mater of the spinal cord. • Around the margins of all the foramina in the skull it becomes continuous with the periosteum on the outside of the skull bones. • At the sutures it is continuous with the sutural ligaments. The Meningeal Layer • is the dura mater proper. • A dense, strong fibrous membrane covering the brain, It is continuous through the foramen magnum with the dura mater of the spinal cord. • It provides tubular sheaths for the cranial nerves as the latter pass through the foramina in the skull. Outside the skull the sheaths fuse with the epineurium of the nerves. • The meningeal layer sends inward four septa, which divide the cranial cavity into freely communicating spaces lodging the subdivisions of the brain. The function of these septa is to restrict rotatory displacement of the brain. They are closely united except along certain lines, where they separate to form venous sinuses.
  32. 32. The Falx Cerebri • is a sickle-shaped fold of dura mater that lies in the midline between the two cerebral hemispheres. • Its narrow end in front is attached to the internal frontal crest and the crista galli. Its broad posterior part blends in the midline with the upper surface of the tentorium cerebelli. • The superior sagittal sinus runs in its upper fixed margin • the inferior sagittal sinus runs in its lower concave free margin • The straight sinus runs along its attachment to the tentorium cere belli. The Tentorium Cerebelli • Is a crescent shaped fold of dura mater that roofs over the posterior cranial fossa. • It covers the upper surface of the cerebellum and supports the occipital lobes of the cerebral hemispheres. • In front there is a gap, the tentorial notch, for the passage of the midbrain,thus producing an inner free border and an outer attached or fixed border. The fixed border is attached to the posterior clinoid processes, the superior borders of the petrous bones, and the margins of the grooves for the transverse sinuses on the occipital bone. The free border runs forward at its two ends, crosses the attached border, and is affixed to the anterior c!inoid process on each side. At the point where the two borders cross, the third and fourth cranial nerves pass forward to enter the lateral wall of the cavernous sinus.
  33. 33. Dural Nerve Supply • Branches of the trigeminal, the vagus, and the first three cervical nerves and branches from the sympathetic system pass to the dura. • The dura possesses numerous sensory endings. The dura is sensitive to stretching, which produces the sensation of headache. • Stimulation of the sensory endings of the trigeminal nerve above the level of the tentorium cerebelli produces referred pain to an area of skin on the same side of the head. • Stimulation of the dural endings below the level of the tentorium produces referred pain to the back of the neck and the back of the scalp along the distribution of the greater occipital nerve. Dural Arterial Supply • Numerous arteries supply the dura mater from the internal carotid, maxillary, ascending pharyngeal, occipital, and vertebral arteries. • From the clinical standpoint, the most important of these arteries is the middle meningeal artery, which is commonly damaged in head injuries. • The meningeal veins lie in the endosteal layer of dura. • The middle meningeal vein follows the branches of the middle meningeal artery and drains into the pterygoid venous plexus or the sphenoparietal sinus.
  34. 34. Arachnoid Mater of the Brain • The arachnoid mater is a delicate, impermeable membrane covering the brain and lying between the pia mater internally and the dura mater externally. • It is separated from the dura by a potential space, the subdural space, and from the pia by the subarachnoid space, which is filled with cerebrospinal fluid. • The arachnoid bridges over the sulci on the surface of the brain, and in certain situations the arachnoid and pia are widely separated to form the subarachnoid cisternae. • All the cisternae are in free communication with each other and with the remainder of the subarachnoid space. • In certain areas the arachnoid projects into the venous sinuses to form arachnoid villi. The arachnoid villi are most numerous along the superior sagittal sinus. Aggregations of arachnoid villi are referred to as arachnoid granulations. • The arachnoid is connected to the pia mater across the fluid-filled subarachnoid space by delicate strands of fibrous tissue. It is important to remember that structures passing to and from the brain to the skull or its foramina must pass through the subarachnoid space. • All the cerebral arteries and veins lie in this space, as do the cranial nerves. • The arachnoid fuses with the epineurium of the nerves at their point of exit from the skull. • For the optic nerve, the arachnoid forms a sheath that extends into the orbital cavity through the optic canal and fuses with the sclera of the eyeball. Thus, the subarachnoid space extends around the optic nerve as far as the eyeball.
  35. 35. Pia Mater Of The Brain • The pia mater is a vascular membrane that closely invests the brain, covering the gyri and descending into the deepest sulci. • It extends over the cranial nerves and fuses with their epineurium. • The cerebral arteries entering the substance of the brain carry a sheath of pia with them. • The pia mater forms the tela choroidea of the roof of the brain's third and fourth ventricles, and it fuses with the ependyma (the thin membrane of glial cells lining the ventricles of the brain) to form the choroid plexuses in the brain's lateral, third, and fourth ventricles.
  36. 36. The Venous Blood Sinuses • The venous sinuses of the cranial cavity are situated between the layers ofthe dura mater. • They are lined with endothelium, and their walls are devoid of muscular tissue. • They contain no valves. • They receive tributaries from a) various parts of the brain b) The diploe c) The orbit d) The internal ear. • The superior sagittal sinus occupies the upper fixed border of the falx cerebri. • The superior sagittal sinus receives in its course the superior cerebral veins. • At the internal occipital protuberance it is dilated to form the confluence of the sinuses • The inferior sagittal sinus occupies the free lower margin of the falx cerebri. It receives a few cerebral veins from the medial surface of the cerebral hemisphere. • The straight sinus occupies the line of junction of the falx cerebri with the tentorium cere belli.lt is formed by the union of the inferior sagittal sinus with the great cerebral vein. It ends by turning to the left (sometimes to the right), to form the transverse sinus. • The transverse sinuses are paired structures that begin at the internal occipital protuberance. The right sinus is usually continuous with the superior sagittal sinus the left, continuous with the straight sinus • it receive the superior petrosal sinuses, inferior cerebral and cerebellar veins, and diploic veins. • Then end by turning downward as the sigmoid sinuses.
  37. 37. • The occipital sinus is a small sinus occupying the attached margin of the falx cerebelli. It communicates with the vertebral veins and drains into the confluence of sinuses. • The cavernous sinuses are situated in the middle cranial fossa on each side of the body of the sphenoid bone. Numerous trabeculae cross their interior, giving them a spongy appearance. Each sinus extends from the superior orbital fissure in front to the apex of the petrous part of the temporal bone behind. • The sinus drains posteriorly into the superior and inferior petrosal sinuses inferiorly into the pterygoid venous plexus. • The two sinuses communicate with each other by means of the anterior and posterior intercavernous sinuses, which run in the diaphragma sellae in front and behind the stalk of the hypophysis cerebri. • The superior and inferior petrosal sinuses are small sinuses situated on the superior and inferior borders of the petrous part of the temporal bone on each side. • Each superior sinus drains the cavernous sinus into the transverse sinus. • each inferior sinus drains the cavernous sinus into the internal jugular vein.
  38. 38. Development Of The Skull • The skull consists of 1) protective case around the brain 2) the neurocranium 3) the skeleton of the jaws. • Initially, these parts are represented by a sheet of condensed mesenchyme that later may become converted into membrane, bone, or cartilage. In some areas the cartilage undergoes endochondral ossification, while in others it persists as cartilage throughout life. The neurocranium may be divided into the cartilaginous part and the membranous part. • The cartilaginous neurocranium is the basal region of the developing skull. By the middle of the third month of prenatal life, the base of the skull is a unified mass of cartilage known as the chondrocranium. Ossification of the chondrocranium begins early in the third month. • The membranous neurocranium ultimately forms the large, flat bones of the vault of the skull, namely, the frontals, parietals, squamous portion of the occipital, and the squamous temporal. the smaller bones, the lacrimals and nasals. Thus, the bones that form the greater part of the sides and roof of the skull are intramembranous in origin.
  39. 39. The Neonatal Skull 1. the neonatal skull shows a dispropor- tionately large size of the cranium relative to the face 2. In childhood, the growth ofthe mandible, the maxillary sinuses, and the alveolar processes of the maxillae results in greatly increased facial length. 3. The bones of the skull are smooth and unilaminar, there being no diploe present 4. The bones of the vault are not closely knit at the sutures but are separated by unossified membranous intervals called fontanelles 5. The mandible has right and left halves at birth, united in the midline with fibrous tissue. The two halves fuse at the symphysis menti by the end of the first year. 6. The angle of the mandible at birth is obtuse , It is only after eruption of the permanent teeth that the angle of the mandible assumes the adult shape 7. In the newborn the mastoid process is not developed, and the facial nerve, as it emerges from the stylomastoid foramen, is very close to the surface and thus may be damaged by forceps in a difficult delivery.
  40. 40. Common Congenital Anomalies • Parietal Foramina in which symmetric foramina occur in the parietal bones. • Ocular Hypertelorism, the eyes are widely separated because of overgrowth of the lesser wing of the sphenoid.
  41. 41. Cranioschisis • the vault of the skull is open • This anomaly is usually associated with anencephaly. • Occasionally it is combined with an open vertebral canal, craniorachischisis. Plagiocephaly • The head is asymmetric in plagiocephaly, possibly because of irregular fusion of the cranial bones. • This condition may be caused by excessive pressure on one part of the developing skull in utero • however, it is not caused by the molding that normally occurs during labor. • The child develops perfectly normally, but the irregular shape of the skull persists. • means premature fusion of some of the cranial sutures. • If the sagittal suture is involved, the skull becomes elongated in anteroposterior diameter. • If the coronal suture fuses early, the skull becomes turret-shaped because of the pushing upward of the parietal and frontal bones. • This condition may lead to a rise in the cerebrospinal fluid pressure, which in turn may lead to mental retardation. Decompression of the skull by craniectomy, leaving the dura mater intact, may be required. Craniosynostosis
  42. 42. Radiographic Appearance X-ray Computed tomography M.R.I.
  43. 43. • The straight posteroanterior (PA) view of the skull. 1. The different parts of the vault of the skull are visible, as are the sagittal, coronal, and lambdoid sutures. 2. The frontal sinuses, 3. the upper and lower margins of the orbit, 4. the nasal septum and the conchae, 5. the maxillary sinuses, and the maxillary teeth can be identified. 6. The rami and body of the mandible are easily recognized. 7. The sphenoidal and ethmoidal air sinuses produce a composite shadow. • Unfortunately, in this position the petrous parts of the temporal bones are superimposed on the lower halves of the orbits For visualization of paranasal sinus the x-ray tube shoud be tilted slightly caudally X-ray
  44. 44. • The lateral view of the skull • is taken with the sagittal plane of the skull parallel with the film cassette. The X-ray tube is centered over the region of the sella turcica. • The coronal, and lambdoid sutures can be recognized. • The inner and outer tables of the skull bones and the intervening diploe can be seen • Anteriorly, a) the frontal air sinuses appear clearly superimposed on each other. b) Behind them the two orbital plates of the frontal bones, which form the roofs of the orbits, can be seen. c) Behind these are the lesser wings of the sphenoid, the anterior clinoid processes, and the sella turcica. d) The curved lines of the greater wings of the sphenoid and the sphenoidal air sinuses should also be recognized. • The nasal bones, the cribriform plate, the hard palate, the maxillary air sinus, and the teeth of the upper and lower jaws can all be seen. The ramus and body of the mandible, and the upper part of the cervical vertebral column should be identified.
  45. 45. Computed Tomography • is commonly used for the detection of intracranial lesions. • The technique is safe for the patient and provides highly accurate information. • CT relies on the physics, in that structures are distinguished from one another by their ability to absorb energy from X-rays. The procedure is quick, lasting only a few seconds for each slice, and most patients require no sedation.
  46. 46. Magnetic Resonance Imaging • MRI is absolutely safe to the patient Because it provides better differentiation between different soft tissues, it can be more revealing than aCT scan. • The reason for this is that some tissues contain more hydrogen in the form of water than do other tissues. technique : uses the magnetic properties of the hydrogen nucleus excited by radiofrequency radiation transmitted by a coil surrounding the body part.
  • ReelBadawi

    Apr. 19, 2021
  • Gorpumomo

    Mar. 21, 2021
  • AboAboody1

    Sep. 26, 2020
  • InshaAnsari1

    Jul. 14, 2020
  • nileshdamor

    May. 18, 2020
  • KarlosSanchez7

    Dec. 24, 2019
  • PramendraAhirwar

    Nov. 18, 2019
  • DickensMurray

    Sep. 7, 2019
  • AdityaDhoriyani

    Jul. 21, 2019

ophthalmology residency program

Aufrufe

Aufrufe insgesamt

873

Auf Slideshare

0

Aus Einbettungen

0

Anzahl der Einbettungen

0

Befehle

Downloads

51

Geteilt

0

Kommentare

0

Likes

9

×