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SPSRI - what goes where final

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SPSRI - what goes where final

  1. 1. What We’ll Cover • Background and Context • Collaboration Tools • Amplifiers, Hurdles, Simplifiers • How to Choose • Action Plan
  2. 2. Definition of terms • Collaboration (def.) – People working with other people toward a common outcome. (M. Sampson, “Collaboration Roadmap”) • Communication is different from, but essential to, collaboration. Flickr photo courtesy of jovike: http://www.flickr.com/photos/jvk/19894053/
  3. 3. Why Does This Matter? • World is: • • • • Smaller Flatter More Complex More Connected • Collaboration is more important than ever, but still done badly. • • • • “We built it and they didn’t come.” “The business” and IT don’t agree Business factors and human factors are not supported enough Plenty of “People-Ready Software,” not enough “Software-Ready People” Flickr photo courtesy of Eric Fischer: http://www.flickr.com/photos/walkingsf/6858366278/
  4. 4. About the Presenter -- Mike Gilronan • SharePoint Practice Director • Former (“recovering”) CPA • 20+ years consulting and professional services experience • ERP and CRM • Collaboration and KM • Business Analysis, Training, Project and Practice Management Knowledge Mgmt Financial SharePoint Mgmt mike.gilronan@mcgladrey.com 617.241.1102 @mikegil http://mikegil.typepad.com/ Project Mgmt
  5. 5. Background – Narrative Arc Ownership Size Complexity Growth Core Business Partner-owned Very large Very High Medium Accounting and Business Advisory Services Family-owned Medium High High Software Product and Related Services Private, VC-backed Medium Medium High Software Services and Related Products Private Small Low Medium Professional Services Private Small Medium High Professional Services (System Integrator) Partner-owned Large High Medium Accounting and Business Advisory Services
  6. 6. Unindicted Co-Conspirator
  7. 7. About YOU -- Objectives • Introduction: • • • • Organization Role Types of Teams Types of Content TO TELL ME ABOUT YOURSELF
  8. 8. Microsoft’s Collaboration Story (ies) Synchronous Less structured More structured Asynchronous 9
  9. 9. What it Means, Too Often Photo source: Wikipedia
  10. 10. Your Palette: Communication and Collaboration Tools
  11. 11. F2F (Face-to-face) Communications • Born: Time immemorial • Peak: pre-Guttenberg (c. 1450 AD) • Claim to Fame: the gold standard for collaboration • Strengths: highest trust, context, verbal + non-verbal, real-time interactive feedback • Weaknesses: highest cost, airfare, real estate, not persistent, requires synchronous presence Flickr photo courtesy of MDGOV: http://www.flickr.com/photos/mdgovpics/7658177776/sizes/l/
  12. 12. (Hand-) Written Communication • Born: ~3,500-2,900 B.C. (Phoenician, Sumerian, Egyptian alphabets) • Peak: pre-Industrial Revolution (c. 1870s, when typewriter and mimeograph were invented) • Claim to Fame: Shakespeare, U.S. Constitution, early Bibles • Strengths: personal, hand-crafted, durable • Weaknesses: time-consuming, slow Flickr photo courtesy of sure2talk: http://www.flickr.com/photos/finlap/213926774/sizes/o/
  13. 13. Telephone • Born: 1876 (A.G. Bell patent) • Peak: 1950s-1970s • Claim to Fame: Cuban Missile Crisis, Watergate, Batman • Strengths: real-time interaction, with inflection • Weaknesses: (usually) no record of conversation, requires synchronous availability Fun fact: When was the Fax machine invented? Flickr photo courtesy of pds209: http://www.flickr.com/photos/paulsedra/9733167606/
  14. 14. Telephone • Born: 1876 (A.G. Bell patent) • Peak: 1950s-1970s • Claim to Fame: Cuban Missile Crisis, Watergate, Batman • Strengths: real-time interaction, with inflection • Weaknesses: (usually) no record of conversation, requires synchronous availability Fun fact: 1843, by Alexander Bain. First commercial version in 1861 by Giovanni Caselli, at least 11 years before invention of workable telephones. Flickr photo courtesy of pds209: http://www.flickr.com/photos/paulsedra/9733167606/
  15. 15. E-mail • Born: 1970s (ARPA), 1990s (commercial) • Peak: 2000s • Claim to Fame: Eliot Spitzer, Enron • Strengths: Simplicity, ubiquity, (relative) permanence, asynchronous, attachments, ubiquity, choice of devices • Weaknesses: (Relative) permanence, spam, reply: all, poor filtering, bad habits, storage, channel vs platform Flickr photo courtesy of xJasonRogersx: http://www.flickr.com/photos/restlessglobetrotter/2660204217/
  16. 16. Network File Shares • Born: 1980s (Novell, etc.) • Peak: 1990s-2000s • Claim to Fame: $22B local company (focused on storage) • Strengths: Ease of use, security, integration with directory services • Weaknesses: Require IT admin, no metadata, weak search, hierarchical
  17. 17. SharePoint • Born: ~2001 • Peak: 2010-2013 • Claim to Fame: Fastest MSFT product to $1B • Strengths: Platform of productivity tools, empowering content owners • Weaknesses: Bad IA, bad governance, bad adoption, limits to/complexity of external sharing
  18. 18. SharePoint -- WGW Drilldown • My Sites • Project Team Sites • Departmental Sites • Geographic Sites • KM Repositories • Home Page • Extranet • Internet
  19. 19. IM and Presence • • • • • Born: Peak: Yet to come Claim to Fame: Strengths: Instant, integrated Weaknesses: IM means “Interrupt Me”, exposure, newness means evolving norms
  20. 20. Video Conferencing • • • • • Born: late 1980s (PictureTel) Peak: Yet to come? (Skype, Facetime, Cisco UC, Lync, etc.) Claim to Fame: Jack Bauer? Strengths: Instant, integrated*, context and non-verbal cues Weaknesses: Quality of video, emerging norms of behavior, not evenly distributed at enterprise level
  21. 21. Enterprise Social Platforms • Born: 2000s • Peak: Yet to come? • Claim to Fame: “Enterprise 2.0” • Strengths: Transparency, connectedness, serendipity, searchability, data exhaust • Weaknesses: Emerging norms, mobility, fragmentation, governance
  22. 22. Frameworks for Assessment
  23. 23. How Do I Choose? • Preferences and styles Flickr photo courtesy of earthworm: http://www.flickr.com/photos/earthworm/4565061206
  24. 24. How Do I Choose? • Preferences and styles • Multiple ways to connect Flickr photo courtesy of earthworm: http://www.flickr.com/photos/earthworm/4565061206
  25. 25. How Do I Choose? • Preferences and styles • Multiple ways to connect • Delineate between core team and broader stakeholder needs Flickr photo courtesy of earthworm: http://www.flickr.com/photos/earthworm/4565061206
  26. 26. How Do I Choose? • Preferences and styles • Multiple ways to connect • Delineate between core team and broader stakeholder needs • Build on comfort to add new capabilities (with clear objectives) Flickr photo courtesy of earthworm: http://www.flickr.com/photos/earthworm/4565061206
  27. 27. How Do I Choose? • Preferences and styles • Multiple ways to connect • Delineate between core team and broader stakeholder needs • Build on comfort to add new capabilities (with clear objectives) • Consider how team members will reach out, and for what purpose Flickr photo courtesy of earthworm: http://www.flickr.com/photos/earthworm/4565061206
  28. 28. How Do I Choose? • Preferences and styles • Multiple ways to connect • Delineate between core team and broader stakeholder needs • Build on comfort to add new capabilities (with clear objectives) • Consider how team members will reach out, and for what purpose • Don’t forget face-to-face meetings (with a purpose!) Flickr photo courtesy of earthworm: http://www.flickr.com/photos/earthworm/4565061206
  29. 29. How Do I Choose? • Preferences and styles • Multiple ways to connect • Delineate between core team and broader stakeholder needs • Build on comfort to add new capabilities (with clear objectives) • Consider how team members will reach out, and for what purpose • Don’t forget face-to-face meetings (with a purpose!) • Create synchronous and asynchronous venues Flickr photo courtesy of earthworm: http://www.flickr.com/photos/earthworm/4565061206
  30. 30. How Do I Choose? • Preferences and styles • Multiple ways to connect • Delineate between core team and broader stakeholder needs • Build on comfort to add new capabilities (with clear objectives) • Consider how team members will reach out, and for what purpose • Don’t forget face-to-face meetings (with a purpose!) • Create synchronous and asynchronous venues • Track progress Flickr photo courtesy of earthworm: http://www.flickr.com/photos/earthworm/4565061206
  31. 31. How Do I Choose? • Preferences and styles • Multiple ways to connect • Delineate between core team and broader stakeholder needs • Build on comfort to add new capabilities (with clear objectives) • Consider how team members will reach out, and for what purpose • Don’t forget face-to-face meetings (with a purpose!) • Create synchronous and asynchronous venues • Track progress • Use alerts! Flickr photo courtesy of earthworm: http://www.flickr.com/photos/earthworm/4565061206
  32. 32. How Do I Choose? • • • • • • • • • • Preferences and styles Multiple ways to connect Delineate between core team and broader stakeholder needs Build on comfort to add new capabilities (with clear objectives) Consider how team members will reach out, and for what purpose Don’t forget face-to-face meetings (with a purpose!) Create synchronous and asynchronous venues Track progress Use alerts! Provide feedback, revisit what’s working/not working Flickr photo courtesy of earthworm: http://www.flickr.com/photos/earthworm/4565061206
  33. 33. Tools and Techniques – Team Norms • Arrival times: early? late OK? Call first? • Working hours? • Expected availability on IM? • Turnaround time on email and voicemail? • Number of exchanges on e-mail before a phone call is made? • Rating content? • Use of BCC? Reply: All? • Totally transparent meetings? MOST IMPORTANT: • What are consequences for breaking these norms, and who enforces?
  34. 34. Tools and Techniques – Communications Plans Sample Team Communication Planning Matrix Objectives Audience Publish definitive RFP Response RFP documents Team Coordinate RFP Response activities each day Team Media Timing Content Creator Content Approver Other Publish PDF documents to Outset of RFP RFP Response Team response Portal process RFP Response Team Lead RFP Response Team Lead Consider Office 365 for ease of external collaboration (external sharing must be activated at site collection level by Farm Admin) Conference call RFP Response Team Lead RFP Response Team Lead Call notes should be disseminated to team at close of call Daily Web conference to Review review documents that Prior to deliverables prior RFP Response are stored in portal and submission of RFP Response to submission Team version-controlled deliverables Team Lead [Adapted from “Leading Effective Virtual Teams,” by Nancy Settle-Murphy, used with permission] RFP Response Team Lead
  35. 35. Case Studies/Scenarios 1. Car talk 2. Partner talk 3. Wall talk
  36. 36. Go Forth… • Listen to your teams • Document your norms • Build and publicize your plans • Deploy your tools • Govern your processes • Measure your results • Listen to your teams
  37. 37. Bibliography and Follow-Up
  38. 38. Wrap-Up • Q&A • Giveaways • Continue the conversation (and materials): • @mikegil • http://mikegil.typepad.com • Thank you to SPSRI and our generous sponsors! Flickr photo courtesy of redstamp: http://www.flickr.com/photos/redstamp/3425825517/ All Flickr photos used with permission under Creative Commons license.
  39. 39. http://www.flickr.com/photos/boliyou/2884130773/

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