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Fougasse and Atget

7. Mar 2016
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Fougasse and Atget

  1. CONNECTIONS
  2. • Cyril Kenneth Bird, pen name Fougasse (17 December 1887 - 11 June 1965) was a British cartoonist best known for his editorship of Punch magazine and his World War II warning propaganda posters. He also designed many posters for the London Underground. • Born in London and educated at Cheltenham College and King's College London (B.Sc). • As one of the best known cartoonists of the time, he was one of 170 authors who created doll-sized books exclusively for Queen Mary's Dolls' House; his illustrated verse tale, written on postage stamp-sized pages, was published as a regular-sized hardback in 2012 by the Royal Collection and Walker Books. • In the course of the 1920s and 1930s, his drawings evolved from the traditionally representational to an innovative, spare, style that was both unique and popular, featuring in many advertising campaigns as well as in magazine editorial. He became art editor of Punch from 1937 to 1949, then editor until 1953. He was the only cartoonist ever to edit the magazine. During World War II, he worked unpaid for the Ministry of Information, designing humorous but effective propaganda posters including the famous "Careless Talk Costs Lives" series. For this work he was awarded the honour of Commander of the Order of the British Empire in 1946. • died in London, aged 77. Fougasse
  3. The campaign included posters entitled 'Careless Talk Costs Lives', which were distributed to offices, shops and pubs around the country, featuring enemy figures, including Hitler and Goering, overhearing members of the British public discussing the war. They aimed to dissuade people from gossiping and inadvertently giving away secrets to the enemy about the British war effort Fougasse was best known for his wartime public information posters, such as ‘Careless Talk Costs Lives', 'War's brutalising influence' Fougasse
  4. Fougasse
  5. Eugène Atget (French: 12 February 1857 – 4 August 1927) was a French flâneur and a pioneer of documentary photography, noted for his determination to document all of the architecture and street scenes of Paris before their disappearance to modernization.Most of his photographs were first published by Berenice Abbott after his death. . Jean-Eugène-Auguste Atget was born 12 February 1857 in Libourne. He gave up acting because of an infection of his vocal cords in 1887, moved to the provinces and took up painting without success. His first photographs, of Amiens and Beauvais, date from 1888 In 1890, Atget moved back to Paris and became a professional photographer, supplying documents for artists: studies for painters, architects, and stage designers In 1920–21, he sold thousands of his negatives to institutions. Financially independent, he took up photographing the parks of Versailles, Saint-Cloud and Sceaux and produced a series of photographs of prostitutes. Atget
  6. • Atget's work is unique on two levels. He was the maker of a great visual catalogue of the fruits of French culture, as it survived in and near Paris in the first quarter of this century. He was in addition a photographer of such authority and originality that his work remains a bench mark against which much of the most sophisticated contemporary photography measures itself. Other photographers had been concerned with describing specific facts (documentation), or with exploiting their indivisual sensibilities (self-expression). Atget transcended both approaches when he set himself the task of understanding and interpreting in visual terms a complex, ancient, and living tradition. • The pictures that he made in the service of this concept are seductively and deceptively simple, wholly poised, reticent, dense with experience, mysterious, and true.
  7. •Both symmetrical fougasse split the page down the middle had the two people sitting in the same place in same position close together. Atget used lines of the building and made the centre block and balanced out the sides. •Fougasse used colour to highlight certain areas for example the yellowish line highlighting hitlers hidden face within the wallpaper. As fougasse didn't use colour he uses light and dark to control the viewers eyes. The really dark windows draws the viewers attention . •The intention of the different artists is going to effect the work fougasse had to send a message about the war whereas Atget had no intentions just to photograph urban cities and this has effected the work as fougasse needed to attract peoples attention which is why he has centred his illustration and Atget has just separated his image into thirds.
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