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What to do
when you
don’t know
what to do
Lou Rosenfeld / LA UX Shindig /  9 February 2016
So what do you do
when you
don’t know
what to do?
Part 1
Lou tries to figure out
UX books
“Most publishers are
frustrated authors”
—Tim O’Reilly, 2005
“Most publishers are
frustrated authors”
—Tim O’Reilly, 2005
“Most publishers are
frustrated authors”
—Tim O’Reilly, 2005
designers
How to improve a product
that you’ve
not created yet?
Show and Tell Sessions
Show and Tell Sessions
Show and Tell Sessions
4 sessions; 5-15 people/session

Questions:

• “Why did you bring these books?”

• “What are their ...
So where do we read?
So where do we read?
Small is good
6”/152mm x 9”/229mm x 150-250pp
Small and portable is good
Practical
is good
C ARD SORTING
Designing Usable Categories
by DONNA SPENCER foreword by Jesse James Garrett
g how
mation
...
Books are judged by their covers
What's everyone's
favorite UX book?
Take-away:

Opinions are freely available

from anyone on everything

—and may even be useful
Take-away:

Opinions are freely available

from anyone on everything

—and may even be useful
How to test a new product
that’s really expensive
to produce?
Prototyping
Prototyping
Used LuLu for paper prototype

(PDF testing was a bit easier)
Prototyping
Usability Testing
Usability Testing
Task analysis + interviews to evaluate

• Support for orientation and fundability

• Author and publishe...
Usability Testing
Task analysis + interviews to evaluate

• Support for orientation and fundability

• Author and publishe...
The front of the book
FREQUENTLY
ASKED QUESTIONS
What do you mean by “content everywhere”?
The way I talk about it, “conte...
The front of the book
FREQUENTLY
ASKED QUESTIONS
What do you mean by “content everywhere”?
The way I talk about it, “conte...
The back cover
www.rosenfeldmedia.com
MORE ON CONTENT EVERYWHERE
www.rosenfeldmedia.com/books/content-everywhere/
Care abo...
The back cover
www.rosenfeldmedia.com
MORE ON CONTENT EVERYWHERE
www.rosenfeldmedia.com/books/content-everywhere/
Care abo...
The back cover
www.rosenfeldmedia.com
MORE ON CONTENT EVERYWHERE
www.rosenfeldmedia.com/books/content-everywhere/
Care abo...
The back cover
www.rosenfeldmedia.com
MORE ON CONTENT EVERYWHERE
www.rosenfeldmedia.com/books/content-everywhere/
Care abo...
The back cover
www.rosenfeldmedia.com
MORE ON CONTENT EVERYWHERE
www.rosenfeldmedia.com/books/content-everywhere/
Care abo...
The back cover
www.rosenfeldmedia.com
MORE ON CONTENT EVERYWHERE
www.rosenfeldmedia.com/books/content-everywhere/
Care abo...
The back cover
www.rosenfeldmedia.com
MORE ON CONTENT EVERYWHERE
www.rosenfeldmedia.com/books/content-everywhere/
Care abo...
2008
2015
2008
2015
2008
interior design
bends,
doesn’t break
Take-away:

What can’t you
prototype and test?
Take-away:

What can’t you
prototype and test?
Take-away:

What can’t you
prototype and test?
Take-away:

What can’t you
prototype and test?
How to improve
a product’s design
over time?
What does it look like?
Mobile User Research
What does it look like?
Mobile User Research
More on the UX Bookmobile

http://rfld.me/1oLrrgB
Take-away:

Identify and close the gaps
between your customers,
products, and you
Take-away:

Identify and close the gaps
between your customers,
products, and you
Part 2
Lou tries to figure out
UX conferences
“We’ve reached
peak UX
conference.”
—me, 2013
“We’ve reached
peak UX
conference.”
—me, 2013
“I’m thrilled to
announce the first
Enterprise UX
conference!”
—me, 2014
How to design a
product around
a conversation?
user experience in the enterprise
1) Take an
existing
conversation
2) Capture it
Facebook
Private List
Twitter
user experience in the enterprise
1) Take an
existing
conversation
2) Capture it
Facebook
Private List
Twitter
user experience in the enterprise
1) Take an
existing
conversation
3) Analyze
...
2) Capture it
Facebook
Private List
Twitter
user experience in the enterprise
4) Sequence
patterns
1) Take an
existing
con...
2) Capture it
Facebook
Private List
Twitter
user experience in the enterprise
4) Sequence
patterns
1) Take an
existing
con...
2) Capture it
Facebook
Private List
Twitter
user experience in the enterprise
4) Sequence
patterns
1) Take an
existing
con...
Take-away:
Information
architecture
is useful
Take-away:
Information
architecture
is useful
How to design to
broaden a conversation?
3 speakers + 1 leader per theme
Leader/speaker conversation 

begins months in advance of event
+ =
4x
3 speakers + 1 leader per theme
Leader/speaker conversation 

begins months in advance of event
+ =
Day 1
Day 2
opening keynote theme 1 theme 2
theme 3 theme 4 closing keynote
Day 1
Day 2
opening keynote theme 1 theme 2
theme 3 theme 4 closing keynote
Day 1
Day 2
√ √
√ √
opening keynote theme 1 theme 2
theme 3 theme 4 closing keynote
storytelling session
Enterprise UX Storytelling
• Eight 5-...
opening keynote theme 1 theme 2
theme 3 theme 4 closing keynote
storytelling session
Enterprise UX Storytelling
• Eight 5-...
Take-away:
Designing for engagement
means letting go of control
Take-away:
Designing for engagement
means letting go of control
How to design to
sustain a conversation?
Story arc from Lichaw’s
The User’s Journey: Storymapping Products that People Love
(Rosenfeld Media, 2016)
The Day 1 Conundrum
The Day 1 Conundrum
Party!
energy
The Day 1 Conundrum
Party!
energy
…SO TIRED…
The Day 1 Conundrum
Party!
energy
The Day 1 Conundrum
Party!
energy
Take-away:
Time is a design material
(and so is delight)
Take-away:
Time is a design material
(and so is delight)
How to design a product
around a conversation 

that may not yet exist?
Broadest possible framing
Broadest possible framing
2 personas
Broadest possible framing
2 personas
+
Strong
lineup
Broadest possible framing
2 personas
+
Strong
lineup
+
User
research
A program based on… user research!
A program based on… user research!
Happy ending: SOLD OUT
Take-away:

User research
equals promotion
One last take-away:

Non-traditional contexts
teach us about UX
One last take-away:

Non-traditional contexts
teach us about UX
What do you do
when you
don’t know
what to do?
What do you do
when you
don’t know
what to do?
Do UX.
What to do when you don't know what to do
What to do when you don't know what to do
What to do when you don't know what to do
What to do when you don't know what to do
What to do when you don't know what to do
What to do when you don't know what to do
What to do when you don't know what to do
What to do when you don't know what to do
What to do when you don't know what to do
What to do when you don't know what to do
What to do when you don't know what to do
What to do when you don't know what to do
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What to do when you don't know what to do

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Presented at NELAUX (9 February 2016) and as the opening keynote at UX New Zealand (29 October 2015).

Veröffentlicht in: Design

What to do when you don't know what to do

  1. 1. What to do when you don’t know what to do Lou Rosenfeld / LA UX Shindig /  9 February 2016
  2. 2. So what do you do when you don’t know what to do?
  3. 3. Part 1 Lou tries to figure out UX books
  4. 4. “Most publishers are frustrated authors” —Tim O’Reilly, 2005
  5. 5. “Most publishers are frustrated authors” —Tim O’Reilly, 2005
  6. 6. “Most publishers are frustrated authors” —Tim O’Reilly, 2005 designers
  7. 7. How to improve a product that you’ve not created yet?
  8. 8. Show and Tell Sessions
  9. 9. Show and Tell Sessions
  10. 10. Show and Tell Sessions 4 sessions; 5-15 people/session Questions: • “Why did you bring these books?” • “What are their good attributes? 
 And bad ones?” • “Where and when do you use them?” Combine competitive and generative research
  11. 11. So where do we read?
  12. 12. So where do we read?
  13. 13. Small is good 6”/152mm x 9”/229mm x 150-250pp Small and portable is good
  14. 14. Practical is good C ARD SORTING Designing Usable Categories by DONNA SPENCER foreword by Jesse James Garrett g how mation sable sort, asy-to- ns-and- emerge d smart Design mation Whether size to CARDSORTINGbyDONNASPENCER
  15. 15. Books are judged by their covers
  16. 16. What's everyone's favorite UX book?
  17. 17. Take-away:
 Opinions are freely available
 from anyone on everything
 —and may even be useful
  18. 18. Take-away:
 Opinions are freely available
 from anyone on everything
 —and may even be useful
  19. 19. How to test a new product that’s really expensive to produce?
  20. 20. Prototyping
  21. 21. Prototyping
  22. 22. Used LuLu for paper prototype (PDF testing was a bit easier) Prototyping
  23. 23. Usability Testing
  24. 24. Usability Testing Task analysis + interviews to evaluate • Support for orientation and fundability • Author and publisher credibility • Readability
  25. 25. Usability Testing Task analysis + interviews to evaluate • Support for orientation and fundability • Author and publisher credibility • Readability More on prototyping/testing books: http://rfld.me/1ONeA9e
  26. 26. The front of the book FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS What do you mean by “content everywhere”? The way I talk about it, “content everywhere” doesn’t mean splattering your message in every corner of the Web. It’s about investing in content that’s flexible enough to go wherever you need it: multiple websites, apps, chan- nels, and other experiences. Why? Because devices of all shapes, sizes, and capabilities are flooding the market, and users expect to get your content on all of them, which you can read about in Chapter 1. Right now, most organizations can barely keep up with their large, unwieldy desktop websites, much less multiple different sets of content for all these different experiences. Content everywhere is all about learning how to pre- pare one set of content to go wherever it’s needed—now and in the future. What do you mean by structured content, and why is it so important? Today, most digital content is unstructured: just words poured onto a page. To signify where one part ends and another begins, writers use formatting, like upping a font size to be a headline or putting an author’s name in italics. This works fine if your content is only going to be used on a single page and viewed on a desktop monitor, but that’s about it. Structured content, on the other hand, is created in smaller modules, which can be stored and used in lots more ways. For example, you could display a headline and a copy teaser in one place, and have a user click to read the rest—something you can’t do if the story is all one blob. You can give the same content different presentation rules when it’s displayed on mobile, such as resizing headlines or changing which content is prioritized or emphasized—automatically. In this way, adding structure actually makes content more flexible, because it allows you to do more with it. You can learn about this in Chapter 5. But don’t I need different, simpler content for mobile? FAQ before the TOC provides context, navigation and orientation
  27. 27. The front of the book FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS What do you mean by “content everywhere”? The way I talk about it, “content everywhere” doesn’t mean splattering your message in every corner of the Web. It’s about investing in content that’s flexible enough to go wherever you need it: multiple websites, apps, chan- nels, and other experiences. Why? Because devices of all shapes, sizes, and capabilities are flooding the market, and users expect to get your content on all of them, which you can read about in Chapter 1. Right now, most organizations can barely keep up with their large, unwieldy desktop websites, much less multiple different sets of content for all these different experiences. Content everywhere is all about learning how to pre- pare one set of content to go wherever it’s needed—now and in the future. What do you mean by structured content, and why is it so important? Today, most digital content is unstructured: just words poured onto a page. To signify where one part ends and another begins, writers use formatting, like upping a font size to be a headline or putting an author’s name in italics. This works fine if your content is only going to be used on a single page and viewed on a desktop monitor, but that’s about it. Structured content, on the other hand, is created in smaller modules, which can be stored and used in lots more ways. For example, you could display a headline and a copy teaser in one place, and have a user click to read the rest—something you can’t do if the story is all one blob. You can give the same content different presentation rules when it’s displayed on mobile, such as resizing headlines or changing which content is prioritized or emphasized—automatically. In this way, adding structure actually makes content more flexible, because it allows you to do more with it. You can learn about this in Chapter 5. But don’t I need different, simpler content for mobile? FAQ before the TOC provides context, navigation and orientation Navigation
  28. 28. The back cover www.rosenfeldmedia.com MORE ON CONTENT EVERYWHERE www.rosenfeldmedia.com/books/content-everywhere/ Care about content? Better copy isn’t enough. As devices and channels multiply—and as users expect to relate, share, and shift information quickly—we need content that can go more places, more easily. Content Everywhere will help you stop creating fixed, single-purpose content and start making it more future-ready, flexible, reusable, manageable, and meaningful wherever it needs to go. “TheWebhasmovedbeyondthedesktop,andourcontentmustfollow.Throughabroadperspective, clear language, and an army of practical suggestions, Sara Wachter-Boettcher guides us through the challenges we face.” ETHAN MARCOTTE Author, Responsive Web Design “If you’re looking for a lucid guide to the new challenges content publishers face, you won’t find a better one than this.” ERIN KISSANE Author, The Elements of Content Strategy, and editor, Contents “Website,app,socialmedia—andmore.Largescreen,tablet,smartphone—andmore.Areyouwriting and rewriting for all these different channels and devices? Stop. Get this book.” JANICE (GINNY) REDISH Author, Letting Go of the Words–Writing Web Content that Works “An essential pretext to achieving responsive Web design. Required reading.” DAN KLYN co-founder, The Understanding Group Cover Illustration by Leanne Shapton | Interior Illustrations by Eva-Lotta Lamm
  29. 29. The back cover www.rosenfeldmedia.com MORE ON CONTENT EVERYWHERE www.rosenfeldmedia.com/books/content-everywhere/ Care about content? Better copy isn’t enough. As devices and channels multiply—and as users expect to relate, share, and shift information quickly—we need content that can go more places, more easily. Content Everywhere will help you stop creating fixed, single-purpose content and start making it more future-ready, flexible, reusable, manageable, and meaningful wherever it needs to go. “TheWebhasmovedbeyondthedesktop,andourcontentmustfollow.Throughabroadperspective, clear language, and an army of practical suggestions, Sara Wachter-Boettcher guides us through the challenges we face.” ETHAN MARCOTTE Author, Responsive Web Design “If you’re looking for a lucid guide to the new challenges content publishers face, you won’t find a better one than this.” ERIN KISSANE Author, The Elements of Content Strategy, and editor, Contents “Website,app,socialmedia—andmore.Largescreen,tablet,smartphone—andmore.Areyouwriting and rewriting for all these different channels and devices? Stop. Get this book.” JANICE (GINNY) REDISH Author, Letting Go of the Words–Writing Web Content that Works “An essential pretext to achieving responsive Web design. Required reading.” DAN KLYN co-founder, The Understanding Group Cover Illustration by Leanne Shapton | Interior Illustrations by Eva-Lotta Lamm Meh
  30. 30. The back cover www.rosenfeldmedia.com MORE ON CONTENT EVERYWHERE www.rosenfeldmedia.com/books/content-everywhere/ Care about content? Better copy isn’t enough. As devices and channels multiply—and as users expect to relate, share, and shift information quickly—we need content that can go more places, more easily. Content Everywhere will help you stop creating fixed, single-purpose content and start making it more future-ready, flexible, reusable, manageable, and meaningful wherever it needs to go. “TheWebhasmovedbeyondthedesktop,andourcontentmustfollow.Throughabroadperspective, clear language, and an army of practical suggestions, Sara Wachter-Boettcher guides us through the challenges we face.” ETHAN MARCOTTE Author, Responsive Web Design “If you’re looking for a lucid guide to the new challenges content publishers face, you won’t find a better one than this.” ERIN KISSANE Author, The Elements of Content Strategy, and editor, Contents “Website,app,socialmedia—andmore.Largescreen,tablet,smartphone—andmore.Areyouwriting and rewriting for all these different channels and devices? Stop. Get this book.” JANICE (GINNY) REDISH Author, Letting Go of the Words–Writing Web Content that Works “An essential pretext to achieving responsive Web design. Required reading.” DAN KLYN co-founder, The Understanding Group Cover Illustration by Leanne Shapton | Interior Illustrations by Eva-Lotta Lamm Meh Meh
  31. 31. The back cover www.rosenfeldmedia.com MORE ON CONTENT EVERYWHERE www.rosenfeldmedia.com/books/content-everywhere/ Care about content? Better copy isn’t enough. As devices and channels multiply—and as users expect to relate, share, and shift information quickly—we need content that can go more places, more easily. Content Everywhere will help you stop creating fixed, single-purpose content and start making it more future-ready, flexible, reusable, manageable, and meaningful wherever it needs to go. “TheWebhasmovedbeyondthedesktop,andourcontentmustfollow.Throughabroadperspective, clear language, and an army of practical suggestions, Sara Wachter-Boettcher guides us through the challenges we face.” ETHAN MARCOTTE Author, Responsive Web Design “If you’re looking for a lucid guide to the new challenges content publishers face, you won’t find a better one than this.” ERIN KISSANE Author, The Elements of Content Strategy, and editor, Contents “Website,app,socialmedia—andmore.Largescreen,tablet,smartphone—andmore.Areyouwriting and rewriting for all these different channels and devices? Stop. Get this book.” JANICE (GINNY) REDISH Author, Letting Go of the Words–Writing Web Content that Works “An essential pretext to achieving responsive Web design. Required reading.” DAN KLYN co-founder, The Understanding Group Cover Illustration by Leanne Shapton | Interior Illustrations by Eva-Lotta Lamm Meh Meh
  32. 32. The back cover www.rosenfeldmedia.com MORE ON CONTENT EVERYWHERE www.rosenfeldmedia.com/books/content-everywhere/ Care about content? Better copy isn’t enough. As devices and channels multiply—and as users expect to relate, share, and shift information quickly—we need content that can go more places, more easily. Content Everywhere will help you stop creating fixed, single-purpose content and start making it more future-ready, flexible, reusable, manageable, and meaningful wherever it needs to go. “TheWebhasmovedbeyondthedesktop,andourcontentmustfollow.Throughabroadperspective, clear language, and an army of practical suggestions, Sara Wachter-Boettcher guides us through the challenges we face.” ETHAN MARCOTTE Author, Responsive Web Design “If you’re looking for a lucid guide to the new challenges content publishers face, you won’t find a better one than this.” ERIN KISSANE Author, The Elements of Content Strategy, and editor, Contents “Website,app,socialmedia—andmore.Largescreen,tablet,smartphone—andmore.Areyouwriting and rewriting for all these different channels and devices? Stop. Get this book.” JANICE (GINNY) REDISH Author, Letting Go of the Words–Writing Web Content that Works “An essential pretext to achieving responsive Web design. Required reading.” DAN KLYN co-founder, The Understanding Group Cover Illustration by Leanne Shapton | Interior Illustrations by Eva-Lotta Lamm Meh Meh
  33. 33. The back cover www.rosenfeldmedia.com MORE ON CONTENT EVERYWHERE www.rosenfeldmedia.com/books/content-everywhere/ Care about content? Better copy isn’t enough. As devices and channels multiply—and as users expect to relate, share, and shift information quickly—we need content that can go more places, more easily. Content Everywhere will help you stop creating fixed, single-purpose content and start making it more future-ready, flexible, reusable, manageable, and meaningful wherever it needs to go. “TheWebhasmovedbeyondthedesktop,andourcontentmustfollow.Throughabroadperspective, clear language, and an army of practical suggestions, Sara Wachter-Boettcher guides us through the challenges we face.” ETHAN MARCOTTE Author, Responsive Web Design “If you’re looking for a lucid guide to the new challenges content publishers face, you won’t find a better one than this.” ERIN KISSANE Author, The Elements of Content Strategy, and editor, Contents “Website,app,socialmedia—andmore.Largescreen,tablet,smartphone—andmore.Areyouwriting and rewriting for all these different channels and devices? Stop. Get this book.” JANICE (GINNY) REDISH Author, Letting Go of the Words–Writing Web Content that Works “An essential pretext to achieving responsive Web design. Required reading.” DAN KLYN co-founder, The Understanding Group Cover Illustration by Leanne Shapton | Interior Illustrations by Eva-Lotta Lamm Meh Meh
  34. 34. The back cover www.rosenfeldmedia.com MORE ON CONTENT EVERYWHERE www.rosenfeldmedia.com/books/content-everywhere/ Care about content? Better copy isn’t enough. As devices and channels multiply—and as users expect to relate, share, and shift information quickly—we need content that can go more places, more easily. Content Everywhere will help you stop creating fixed, single-purpose content and start making it more future-ready, flexible, reusable, manageable, and meaningful wherever it needs to go. “TheWebhasmovedbeyondthedesktop,andourcontentmustfollow.Throughabroadperspective, clear language, and an army of practical suggestions, Sara Wachter-Boettcher guides us through the challenges we face.” ETHAN MARCOTTE Author, Responsive Web Design “If you’re looking for a lucid guide to the new challenges content publishers face, you won’t find a better one than this.” ERIN KISSANE Author, The Elements of Content Strategy, and editor, Contents “Website,app,socialmedia—andmore.Largescreen,tablet,smartphone—andmore.Areyouwriting and rewriting for all these different channels and devices? Stop. Get this book.” JANICE (GINNY) REDISH Author, Letting Go of the Words–Writing Web Content that Works “An essential pretext to achieving responsive Web design. Required reading.” DAN KLYN co-founder, The Understanding Group Cover Illustration by Leanne Shapton | Interior Illustrations by Eva-Lotta Lamm Meh Meh MEH!
  35. 35. 2008
  36. 36. 2015 2008
  37. 37. 2015 2008 interior design bends, doesn’t break
  38. 38. Take-away:
 What can’t you prototype and test?
  39. 39. Take-away:
 What can’t you prototype and test?
  40. 40. Take-away:
 What can’t you prototype and test?
  41. 41. Take-away:
 What can’t you prototype and test?
  42. 42. How to improve a product’s design over time?
  43. 43. What does it look like? Mobile User Research
  44. 44. What does it look like? Mobile User Research
  45. 45. More on the UX Bookmobile
 http://rfld.me/1oLrrgB
  46. 46. Take-away:
 Identify and close the gaps between your customers, products, and you
  47. 47. Take-away:
 Identify and close the gaps between your customers, products, and you
  48. 48. Part 2 Lou tries to figure out UX conferences
  49. 49. “We’ve reached peak UX conference.” —me, 2013
  50. 50. “We’ve reached peak UX conference.” —me, 2013 “I’m thrilled to announce the first Enterprise UX conference!” —me, 2014
  51. 51. How to design a product around a conversation?
  52. 52. user experience in the enterprise 1) Take an existing conversation
  53. 53. 2) Capture it Facebook Private List Twitter user experience in the enterprise 1) Take an existing conversation
  54. 54. 2) Capture it Facebook Private List Twitter user experience in the enterprise 1) Take an existing conversation 3) Analyze for patterns
  55. 55. 2) Capture it Facebook Private List Twitter user experience in the enterprise 4) Sequence patterns 1) Take an existing conversation 3) Analyze for patterns
  56. 56. 2) Capture it Facebook Private List Twitter user experience in the enterprise 4) Sequence patterns 1) Take an existing conversation 3) Analyze for patterns
  57. 57. 2) Capture it Facebook Private List Twitter user experience in the enterprise 4) Sequence patterns 1) Take an existing conversation 3) Analyze for patterns Tactical Strategic 1 2 3 4
  58. 58. Take-away: Information architecture is useful
  59. 59. Take-away: Information architecture is useful
  60. 60. How to design to broaden a conversation?
  61. 61. 3 speakers + 1 leader per theme Leader/speaker conversation 
 begins months in advance of event + =
  62. 62. 4x 3 speakers + 1 leader per theme Leader/speaker conversation 
 begins months in advance of event + =
  63. 63. Day 1 Day 2
  64. 64. opening keynote theme 1 theme 2 theme 3 theme 4 closing keynote Day 1 Day 2
  65. 65. opening keynote theme 1 theme 2 theme 3 theme 4 closing keynote Day 1 Day 2 √ √ √ √
  66. 66. opening keynote theme 1 theme 2 theme 3 theme 4 closing keynote storytelling session Enterprise UX Storytelling • Eight 5-minute sessions • Tightly curated by Dan Willis • Participation by application only Day 1 Day 2 √ √ √ √
  67. 67. opening keynote theme 1 theme 2 theme 3 theme 4 closing keynote storytelling session Enterprise UX Storytelling • Eight 5-minute sessions • Tightly curated by Dan Willis • Participation by application only Day 1 Day 2 √ √ √ √ √
  68. 68. Take-away: Designing for engagement means letting go of control
  69. 69. Take-away: Designing for engagement means letting go of control
  70. 70. How to design to sustain a conversation?
  71. 71. Story arc from Lichaw’s The User’s Journey: Storymapping Products that People Love (Rosenfeld Media, 2016)
  72. 72. The Day 1 Conundrum
  73. 73. The Day 1 Conundrum Party! energy
  74. 74. The Day 1 Conundrum Party! energy …SO TIRED…
  75. 75. The Day 1 Conundrum Party! energy
  76. 76. The Day 1 Conundrum Party! energy
  77. 77. Take-away: Time is a design material (and so is delight)
  78. 78. Take-away: Time is a design material (and so is delight)
  79. 79. How to design a product around a conversation 
 that may not yet exist?
  80. 80. Broadest possible framing
  81. 81. Broadest possible framing 2 personas
  82. 82. Broadest possible framing 2 personas + Strong lineup
  83. 83. Broadest possible framing 2 personas + Strong lineup + User research
  84. 84. A program based on… user research!
  85. 85. A program based on… user research! Happy ending: SOLD OUT
  86. 86. Take-away:
 User research equals promotion
  87. 87. One last take-away:
 Non-traditional contexts teach us about UX
  88. 88. One last take-away:
 Non-traditional contexts teach us about UX
  89. 89. What do you do when you don’t know what to do?
  90. 90. What do you do when you don’t know what to do? Do UX.

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