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Interventions (street art)

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Interventions (street art)

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Also known as street art, guerilla art and, sometimes, graffiti. It’s “any anonymous work installed, performed or attached in public spaces with the purpose of affecting the world in a creative or thought-provoking way.” Keri Smith

Also known as street art, guerilla art and, sometimes, graffiti. It’s “any anonymous work installed, performed or attached in public spaces with the purpose of affecting the world in a creative or thought-provoking way.” Keri Smith

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Interventions (street art)

  1. 1. interventions aka street art guerrilla art
  2. 2. Interventions, or street art, or guerilla art is “any anonymous work (including but not limited to graffiti, signage, performance, additions, and decorations) installed, performed, or attached in public spaces, with the distinct purpose of affecting the world in a creative or thought-provoking way.” Keri Smith, The Guerilla Art Kit
  3. 3. Marcus Aurelius Piazza del Campidoglio Rome There have always been public art and statues. These are not ‘street’ art or interventions
  4. 4. THIS is an intervention...
  5. 5. Kwame Monroe aka Bear 167, "Sunday Afternoon," 1984 most interventions are street graffiti...
  6. 6. some graffiti is very clever and thoughtful Todd Vanderlin: “Graffiti Taxonomy is a graffiti-based study in which characters are isolated from a collection of graffiti tags that were photographed in the same geographic region.”
  7. 7. some, such as subway graffiti, can be extremely ambitious
  8. 8. street art has been around for a long time
  9. 9. and has continued since the cave paintings kilroy, very popular among soldiers in WWII, can be found all over the globe and has come to represent graffiti art
  10. 10. legal? • usually not so there are some RULES: • don’t damage property • use environmentally friendly materials NO canned spray paint! NO permanent glues! chalk is good removable/washable glues - wheat paste and suggestions... • some sites are safer than others: temporary construction walls sidewalks anywhere where damage will not result • watch out for: security cameras signs that say ‘post no bills’ cops • work quickly and change location
  11. 11. while street graffiti—this from Paris—is what we usually think of as street art, or guerrilla art, so-called fine artists have also practiced forms of interventions
  12. 12. keith haring began his career making graffiti in subway stations, using chalk on the black paper which covered empty ad space
  13. 13. keith haring subway graffiti , with audience
  14. 14. kenny scharf, art world star and entrepreneur, began with wall graffiti and then moved to canvas
  15. 15. fab5 freddie kenny sharf, andy warhol, keith haring
  16. 16. jean-michel basquiat, one of the great expressionist painters of the 1980’s, began as SAMO©, leaving thought-provoking tags all over NYC
  17. 17. jean-michel basquiat paintings Jean-Michel Basquiat_Fallen Angel, 1981 Catharsis 1983 triptych, acrylic on canvas, 72-3/8 x 92-7/8 inches "Untitled (Angel)" acrylic on canvas 96 by 169 inches, 1982
  18. 18. many other artists, starting from inside the art world, wanted to move to the streets in order to reach a wider audience, escape the tyranny of commerce, and re-capture the freshness and excitement of surprise, discovery and delight daniel buren permutations: fragment 1-3 1973 daniel buren the two levels 1986
  19. 19. daniel buren escalator, 1979 daniel buren ballets, NY, 1975
  20. 20. daniel buren title?, 2009 art does not have to be paint on canvas, or bronze
  21. 21. Modern culture with it’s overwhelming advertising, mass media and endless information teaches us to tune out, to disconnect. Small, anonymous art gestures can encourage the viewer to take the world a bit less seriously, to connect with something outside the predictable. Keri Smith, The Guerilla Art Kit
  22. 22. eleanor antin, in 1971-73, took 100 boots around the world and photographed them in various settings eleanor antin 100 boots 1971-73
  23. 23. eleanor antin 100 boots 1971-73
  24. 24. niele toroni (swiss, lives in france) has been painting using a brush on whatever since the 1960s. the strokes are all carefully measured and applied, always similar but not the same, and appear in unexpected places niele toroni title?, date? kunsthalle, bern niele toroni title?, date?
  25. 25. Guerilla art is for everyone. It engages viewers who might never step foot in a gallery. It is free and accessible. Keri Smith, The Guerilla Art Kit
  26. 26. richard artschwager (a fave) has been making extraordinary things since the early 1960s. blps were (are) small lozenge-shaped drawings/paintings/objects which appeared all over NY and elsewhere, more or less randomly, over many years richard artschwager blps richard artschwager hair blp
  27. 27. richard artschwager blps
  28. 28. art can be done on the street and still maintain respect for the environment and for property. francesca pirillo lays cut-out drawings in public places and photographs the results francesca pirillo
  29. 29. Richard Hambleton creepy-ass street lurkers
  30. 30. Richard Hambleton Mary Cate Olson at a Hambleton opening
  31. 31. jr (a very private artist who won’t reveal his name or give interviews) travels the world producing temporary photographic interventions jr salvation beirut jr cambodia
  32. 32. jr 2 pieces from the ‘women’ series Brussels, Belgium (above) Paris (right)
  33. 33. jr kibera, nairobi 2009 jr on the palestinian side of the israeli security fence 2007
  34. 34. leo & pipo printed paper france
  35. 35. banksy, ubiquitous outdoor art provocateur. banksy is the pseudonym of a british graffiti artist, political activist and painter whose identity is unconfirmed
  36. 36. banksy?
  37. 37. banksy murals on the security fence between Israel and the Palestinians
  38. 38. banksy
  39. 39. sculptural interventions? why sure! allan molho, nyc anonymous street sculpture italy anonymous street sculpture altered mailbox
  40. 40. artist unknown space invader series paris
  41. 41. jan vormann (sweden) enlisted the aid of the lego company and several helpers for a series of street sculptures—repairs—in nyc jan vormann us post office
  42. 42. jan vormann
  43. 43. jan vormann
  44. 44. Juliana Santacruz Herrera began filling Paris’s potholes with elaborate knitted plugs back in 2009 as an artful way of illustrating the problem she was seeing on the decaying streets
  45. 45. Juliana Santacruz Herrera yarn bombs
  46. 46. a pothole art how-to lesson
  47. 47. On permanence in art: nothing in life is permanent here today, gone tomorrow embrace change
  48. 48. non-destructive graffiti: moose—a london graffiti artist who uses soap and water to write on walls & sidewalks
  49. 49. which reminded me of chinese street calligraphy practice, done with brush and water
  50. 50. more non-destructive interventions: knit graffiti
  51. 51. Houston’s most notorious graffiti crew: Knitta Please
  52. 52. Neozoon (France and Germany): the project was to take discarded fur coats and cut them into animal shapes, which it pasted to city surfaces.
  53. 53. neozoon fox recycled fur, 2009 neozoon dog recycled fur coat, 2009
  54. 54. I do not personally attempt to make work with an overt political message. Instead I let the medium itself be the political act... I become an integral part of public space instead of feeling like a visitor... Keri Smith, The Guerilla Art Kit
  55. 55. highly political: one million bones a fundraising art installation designed to recognize the millions of victims and survivors who have been killed or displaced by ongoing genocides www.onemillionbones.org
  56. 56. non-political: edgar mueller (england) www.metanamorph.com/
  57. 57. digression— anamorphosis Anamorphosis is a distorted projection or perspective requiring the viewer to use special devices or occupy a specific vantage point to reconstitute the image. "Ana - morphosis" comes from the Greek words meaning "formed again." There are two main types: Perspective (oblique) and Mirror (catoptric). Examples of perspectival anamorphosis date to the early Renaissance (15th Century), whereas examples of mirror anamorphosis (or catoptric anamorphosis) occurred at the time of the baroque (17th century). With mirror anamorphosis, a conical or cylindrical mirror is placed on the drawing or painting to transform a flat distorted image into a three dimensional picture that can be viewed from many angles. Leonardo's Eye (Leonardo da Vinci, c. 1485) is the earliest known example of perspective anamorphosis.
  58. 58. Andrea Pozzo: ceiling, Church of St. Ignazio, 1685+/- perspectival anamorphosis
  59. 59. Hans Holbein the Younger: ‘The Ambassadors’ (1533) with a memento mori anamorph skull in the foreground.
  60. 60. artist unknown angel anamorph
  61. 61. Istvan Orosz: Mirror (catoptric) Anamorphosis with Column
  62. 62. Istvan Orosz: Mirror (catoptric) Anamorphosis with Column
  63. 63. Andrew Compton: catoptric anamorphosis of scientist John Dalton artist unknown: catoptric anamorphosis of a thumb
  64. 64. Istvan Orosz: stairway anamorphosis—3 views
  65. 65. ?: stairway anamorphosis NYC subway platform
  66. 66. Edgar Mueller of England said he was inspired by the British 'Pavement Picasso' Julian Beever, whose makes dramatic but more gentle 3D street images
  67. 67. Edgar Mueller
  68. 68. still more non-destructive interventions: moss graffiti anna garforth
  69. 69. edina tokodi artists unknown radical moss graffiti
  70. 70. el&abe (eleanor stevens and anna garforth) church moss graffiti, england
  71. 71. rice paddy murals inakadate, japan koichi hanada, a clerk in the village hall, came up with the idea in response to a request from his boss to find a way of bringing more tourists to town. originally rice with dark purplish and bright green stalks were used. in recent years, genetically engineered plants have been added to produce dark red, yellow and white.
  72. 72. masanobu fukuoka—not (officially) an artist, but a Japanese natural-philosopher- farmer, educator writer, naturalist, researcher and professional biological scientist. he also gets credit for invention of ‘the seed bomb’. seed balls (or seed bombs, earth dumplings) are often used by guerilla gardeners in reclaiming derelict land in their neighborhoods.
  73. 73. seed ball grown field seed balling in brooklyn, ny planting seed balls
  74. 74. Joel Tauber, Tree Baby Tree Baby is part of an ongoing project which began when the artist fell in love with a California Sycamore tree in the middle of a giant parking lot at the Rose Bowl. After caring for the tree, he cultivated approximately two hundred “tree babies” (seedlings from the original tree) to plant in public locales throughout California. Approximately one hundred and forty Tree Babies have been planted thus far; the locations have been mapped and are available at www.joeltauber.com/treebabymap.html.
  75. 75. Joel Tauber, Tree Baby
  76. 76. Paul Ramírez Jonas The Keys to the City Participants get a key that grants access to generally off-limits parts of the city. The key opens locks at two dozen locations, from the baptistry at the Cathedral Church of St. John the Divine to a locker at Gleason's Gym in Brooklyn. not quite guerrilla, but definitely alternative and street... Jaws-At the ice-cream shop, the key unlocked a box that contained an assortment of items.
  77. 77. Lauren Burke, used her key to set up blind dates at each location and blog about it. During her date with Tim Freeman the couple unlocked a gate to a secret space under the floor of the Conference House Park Pavillion on Staten Island.
  78. 78. explores the odd, ordinary and ingenious in daily life. AiOP aims to stretch the boundaries in the public realm by presenting artworks outside the confines of public space regulations. Chance Meeting. Linda Hesh hangs doorknob signs on 14th St in 8 waves beginning with ‘Is it really you?’ and ending with ‘Let’s meet again soon’ capturing a desire for connection and communication. these projects are from the october, 2010 edition
  79. 79. City Souvenirs. Liene Bosque and Nicole Seisler, dressed in “official” uniforms, walk 14th St with a cart loaded with clay making impressions of often-unnoticed details Hydrophony. Heather Dewey-Hagborg and Thomas Dexter reveal the sounds of the of the Hudson and East Rivers by installing underwater microphones and broadcasting the sounds of fish, boats, etc live and online: www.hydrophony.com TXTual Healing. Paul Notzold invites passersby to respond to a subject via test messages and projects the resulting dialogue onto urban structure, thereby encouraging communication, happenstance and curiosity.
  80. 80. Luck Be a Lady. Maya Suess positions herself on 14th St with two women holding a sign: “Luck Be a Lady: Offering Luck, Free.” Pump 14 is a manual bucket system performed by the 6 members of the BroLab collaborative. Using self-constructed yokes and pails they transport water from the Hudson to the East Rivers by foot, shedding light on the city’s waterways. Silent Call. Christopher Dameron and Annika Newell place calls to 5 pay phones along 14th St which will emit historic sounds from its heritage— ad jingles, trolley crossings, etc—collated from the NY Public Library’s sound archive
  81. 81. some random street interventions...
  82. 82. lucho and quillo cardboard car santiago de chile laser graffiti
  83. 83. manhole covers japan does this suggest any possibilities?
  84. 84. sign interventions guerrilla reprogramming of traffic signs
  85. 85. or make your own dang signs!
  86. 86. a guerrilla art crew made a line down a block of 5th ave near 23rd st, designating one lane for locals and the other for tourists. if questioned they explained that tourists walk more slowly
  87. 87. sten, lex & lucamaleonte calling all angels printed paper via nuoro, florence
  88. 88. credits & resources Keri Smith, The Guerilla Art Kit: Everything You Need to Put Your Message Out Into the World, Princeton Architectural Press, NY, 2007 www.guerrillagirls.com/ : radical feminist artists fighting discrimination with facts, humor and fake fur www.artinoddplaces.org/ : stretching the boundaries in the public realm by presenting artworks outside the confines of public space regulations www.woostercollective.com/ : dedicated to showcasing and celebrating ephemeral art placed on streets in cities around the world www.interestingideas.com/roadside/roadside.htm : America's great art seen from the window of a passing car www.flickr.com/groups/951701@N24/pool/ : photos of street sculptures and installations www.robbieconal.com/ : website of a long-time guerrilla political poster maker i haven’t seen these... Eleanor Mathieson, Street Artists: The Complete Guide, Korero Books, 2009 Guerrilla Girls, The Guerrilla Girls' Bedside Companion to the History of Western Art, Penguin Books, 1998 Cristian Campos, 1,000 Ideas for Graffiti and Street Art: Murals, Tags, and More from Artists Around the World, Rockport Publishers, 2011
  89. 89. project possibilitiesstencils leave notes in library or bookstore books guerilla gardening poster of your day paper, pens, markers, photos, copier, paste make a map of your area mark “you are here” where you leave the map mark your favorite sites, trees, whatever post small notices ‘NOTICE - the tree to the right’ ‘NOTICE - woodpeckers nesting 12’ up’ public chalkboard make and place a chalkboard, with chalk leave sign inviting people to draw, leave messages, etc public chalk drawing: leave a bucket of chalk near a sidewalk notebook: leave a notebook & pen ask people to make a note or drawing and pass it on found photos: take a photo of yourself at different locations post the photos nearby knitted tags: measure something like a tree or pole knit a cover for part of it sew the cover around the object books: make a book, cover and all leave it on a library shelf wall tags: check the local museum for what style of tag they have with the displays make one with you as the artist and substitute wall art: create a grid on a wall with multi-colored post-its make a polka dot wall with post-its cut into dots leave food bombs—lettuce, chard, etc—in public areas
  90. 90. an exercise: • you suddenly have the ability to transmit your thoughts to others (individuals, groups, everyone) • you can only do it three times • what would you say... 1. _____________________________________________ 2. _____________________________________________ 3. _____________________________________________ some suggestions: • look at your environment as if you were a tourist and have never seen it. attend to details. don’t judge • observe how people interact with their environment. can you use their habits to interact? • note your feelings. angry? teary? disengaged? why? • humor helps reach people. it’s non-confrontational • combine/add to/alter/reinvent ideas that already exist. build on others’ ideas • use your daily life as a source of ideas. how are your perceptions unique. how have your experiences shaped you • record your ideas as they occur. keep a journal
  91. 91. masanobu fukuoka—seed ball recipe materials: •native seeds •compost •clay instructions: •combine 2 parts seeds with 3 parts water •stir in 5 parts powdered clay (more mix seeds into wet clay) •mold into small balls •let dry for 1 or 2 days seed balls do not need to be buried or watered they will self-germinate when conditions are right chuck into landfill, empty lots introduce to cracks in the sidewalk leave food bombs—lettuce, chard, etc—in public areas
  92. 92. how to make stickers good for any shape or size of sticker non-destructive glue which you can lick to moisten materials: •1 package (1.4 oz) unflavored gelatin •1 tbsp cold water •3 tbsp hot water •1/2 tsp sugar • paper instructions: •sprinkle gelatin into cold water. let soften for 5 minutes •pour in hot water until dissolved. add sugar and stir •use brush to coat back of paper—apply thickly •let dry • when ready, lick and stick
  93. 93. how to make wheat paste one of the most environmentally friendly adhesives materials: •3 tbsp cold water •3 tbsp white flour •1 cup hot water • container with lid instructions: •boil water in kettle • mix flour and cold water to make smooth paste •put hot water in pot •slowly pour in cold mixture, stirring constantly •bring to a boil until paste thickens •add sugar. mix well, allow to cool. keep refrigerated •when ready, brush on paste. cover front to make weatherproof
  94. 94. recipe for moss graffiti materials: • 1 can of beer • 1/2 teaspoon sugar • Several clumps garden moss • container with lid • a blender and a paintbrush instructions: • crumble moss into a blender • add the beer and sugar • blend to create a smooth, creamy consistency • paint your chosen design onto the wall • keep mixture is moist for a few weeks

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