Diese Präsentation wurde erfolgreich gemeldet.
Die SlideShare-Präsentation wird heruntergeladen. ×

Markus heinsdorff design with nature

Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Bamboo battens after being steam-treated in a pressure tank Bambusleisten nach der Behandlung mit Dampf im Druckkessel
1
German-Chinese House at EXPO 2010 in Shanghai Deutsch-Chinesisches Haus auf der EXPO Shanghai 2010
2
markus heinsdorff
design with nature
the bamboo architecture
die bambusbauten
Printed on recycling paper: Space Shuttle/Ma...
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige

Hier ansehen

1 von 104 Anzeige
Anzeige

Weitere Verwandte Inhalte

Ähnlich wie Markus heinsdorff design with nature (14)

Anzeige

Aktuellste (20)

Anzeige

Markus heinsdorff design with nature

  1. 1. Bamboo battens after being steam-treated in a pressure tank Bambusleisten nach der Behandlung mit Dampf im Druckkessel 1
  2. 2. German-Chinese House at EXPO 2010 in Shanghai Deutsch-Chinesisches Haus auf der EXPO Shanghai 2010 2
  3. 3. markus heinsdorff design with nature the bamboo architecture die bambusbauten Printed on recycling paper: Space Shuttle/Matt by Gold East, China Gedruckt auf Recyclingpapier: Space Shuttle/Matt von Gold East, China
  4. 4. Alexander von Vegesack bambus – ein material der zukunft die pavillonbauten Gottfried Knapp design aus der natur die bambus-pavillons navette-pavillon diamant-pavillon lotus-pavillon konferenz-pavillon zentraler ausstellungspavillon dom-pavillon aufbau pavillons und städte die deutsch-chinesische promenade Michael Kahn-Ackermann über den import von bambushütten expo 2010 shanghai das deutsch-chinesische haus Gottfried Knapp aufstieg ins zweite geschoss das deutsch-chinesische haus auf der expo in shanghai das deutsch-chinesische haus aufbau furniture (einbauten und möbel) Alexander von Vegesack bamboo – a material of the future the pavilions Gottfried Knapp design from nature the bamboo pavilions of markus heinsdorff navette pavilion diamond pavilion lotus pavilion conference pavilion central exhibition pavilion dome pavilion assembly pavilions and cities german-chinese esplanade Michael Kahn-Ackermann on the importation of bamboo huts expo 2010 shanghai the german-chinese house Gottfried Knapp up onto the second floor the german-chinese house at expo 2010 in shanghai the german-chinese house assembly furniture kunstinstallationen Gottfried Knapp stoff für utopien markus heinsdorffs kunstinstallationen aus bambus skyplace living dome tree house european dome bambus Manfred Baur bambus – die pflanze wundergras und material der zukunft Mike Sieder structural design Technische Universität Darmstadt verbindungen optimierung des bambus-beton-verbunds Tongji Universität, Shanghai material testing markus heinsdorff ausstellungen und bambusbauten beteiligte art installations Gottfried Knapp utopian material markus heinsdorff’s bamboo art installations skyplace living dome tree house european dome bamboo Manfred Baur bamboo – a miracle grass and material of the future Mike Sieder structural design Technische Universität Darmstadt connections optimizing bamboo-concrete-composites Tongji University, Shanghai material testing markus heinsdorff exhibitions and bamboo projects professionals involved 012 018 026 036 048 056 066 072 074 088 096 112 118 132 148 156 160 166 170 174 180 186 188 196 200 201 206 contents inhalt 014 022 026 036 048 056 066 072 074 088 100 114 118 132 148 158 160 166 170 174 184 187 192 197 200 204 206
  5. 5. 12 13 Markus Heinsdorff has been studying the design and technical possibilities of bam- boo for many years in Asia. One significant result of his studies is a series of pavilions made from this material that he designed for a travelling exhibition of German in- dustry and culture in China. The simple, basic form of his pavilions is derived from sophisticated structural design, with the walls and ceilings of their light, supporting structures closed off with translucent membranes. His use of bamboo is not rem­ iniscent of traditional construction methods but rather takes its place entirely within the modern context of the organic architecture of such master architects as Santiago Calatrava and Dominique Perrault. At the same time, Heinsdorff’s pavilions create atmospherically luminous environments in line with the ephemeral use of these structures. I first encountered Markus Heinsdorff and his pavilions in 2008 in Guangzhou, China. I share with him and other designers a growing fascination with bamboo as a highly efficient and versatile material. Since the founding of the Vitra Design Museum, we have endeavoured to question and expand our view of design and architecture with unusual topics and new dis- coveries. Such an opportunity presented itself in 1996, in Bogotá, when the Colom- bian curator José Ignacio Roca introduced me to the architect Simón Vélez. After welcoming us into his home on the third floor of an urban apartment building, Vélez led us through a window and across a suspension bridge to additional rooms he had created for himself with bamboo canes in a lush jungle in the middle of the city – a realm in which to dream about and plan new projects. In the following days, I also became acquainted with Vélez’s bamboo architecture in the form of social housing, villas, club facilities for affluent city dwellers and an observation tower. I was immediately fascinated by his bamboo architecture because, by using joints with concrete filling in the bamboo, it exploits the material’s building capabilities both simply and intelligently. I also learned from Vélez about the world- wide network of aficionados – of which I was soon to be a member – who, via platforms and projects between Bogotá, Bali, Hong Kong and Central Europe, ex- plore bamboo and its possible applications. Vélez carried out his first construction outside South America in 1999 during the workshops that I held in conjunction with our museum at the Domaine de Boisbu- chet in south-west France. It was a widely protruding, stilted roof – like a huge sun hat that provided shade for the estate’s orchard all summer long but that was blown away that same winter by hurricane Lothar. Determined, nevertheless, to prove the stability of bamboo as a construction material even in Europe, by 2004 we had jointly built another three structures on the grounds – a residential house, a confer- ence pavilion and a free-standing tent roof – all of which are still in use to this day. Because these were the first modern bamboo structures in Europe, there were admittedly a number of difficulties we had to overcome. The procurement and delivery of the materials were among the easier tasks, even if the occasional cane was punctured and made useless by the customs authorities searching for drugs. Official approval of the construction work proved to be more complicated because bamboo was not certified as a building material, and approval was gained only with the aid of experimental statics to demonstrate the functional stability of the structures. In connection with the Colombian national pavilion that Vélez built for the World Expo 2000 in Hanover, our museum published Grow Your Own House, a book on bamboo ­— a material of the future bamboo architecture intended to introduce the material’s story and capabilities to a larger number of architects and designers. In it, we documented the fascination with bamboo among renowned designers and architects like Buckminster Fuller, Frei Otto, Renzo Piano and Arata Isozaki, and showed the use of the material in gridshell construction and in high-tech composites, as well as its various cultural anchorings. It has been a long time since bamboo was considered to be the ‘poor man’s’ build- ing material, and it is constantly finding new areas of application. One finds prefab- ricated bamboo parquet flooring, bamboo furniture, bamboo composites and even carpets of bamboo fibre that have the sheen and feel of silk. It is this versatility that also makes bamboo so valuable as a building material at our workshops in Boisbuchet. But what leaves a lasting impression of the architecture built there is, first and foremost, the sustainability with which this building material can be processed, implemented and recycled – after a cultivation and harvesting that also makes it far more environmentally friendly than most other traditional building materials. This aspect of sustainability is of even greater significance in Boisbuchet, where young designers and architects acquire not only creative skills and technical know-how, but also – as a matter of course – hone their socials skills and increase their ecological expertise. Right after I had visited Heinsdorff’s pavilions in China at the invitation of the Goethe Institute, I was keen on acquiring one of these buildings for the Domaine de Bois- buchet, where – apart from Vélez – the engineer and architect Jörg Schlaich, the Japanese architect Shigeru Ban and the Franconian architects Brückner + Brückner had already demonstrated the innovative use of material and construction in per- manent buildings. Heinsdorff’s work would be a wonderful addition to this ensem- ble, which illustrates the harmonious interaction of nature, agriculture, art and ar- chitecture. First of all, I invited Vélez to Boisbuchet to hold a workshop there in the summer of 2009 that was attended by students from Asia, Europe and America. Starting with a number of experiments designed to introduce the participants to the mater­ ial’s capabilities, he then challenged them to develop ideas for everyday objects that could be fashioned on the spot from the various shapes of semi-finished bamboo products. The wide range of results generated during this week alone showed the great potential of the material: from translucent lamps to coal as a pollutant filter, a variety of toys, jewellery, furniture and musical instruments, all the way to an entire tree house. In the meantime, an opportunity has arisen for the museum to obtain several of the 22 pavilions Markus Heinsdorff used in China. While some will be used for events at the Domaine de Boisbuchet and one will perhaps serve as a reception building for the grounds, others will be given by Boisbuchet to other institutions. The pavil- ions have already impressively demonstrated their versatility, their stability when in continuous use and their durability despite frequent assembly and dismantling. Yet the characteristic, charming ambience of their interior comes to life both with the changing light during the day and at night and when installed at new locations. In this way, Heinsdorff’s message that bamboo architecture is as long-lasting as it is imaginative is being conveyed to the world. Alexander von Vegesack
  6. 6. 14 15 Über viele Jahre hat sich Markus Heinsdorff in Asien mit den gestalterischen und technischen Möglichkeiten des Bambus befasst. Ein bedeutendes Ergebnis seiner Studien ist eine Reihe von Pavillons aus diesem Material, die er für eine Wander- ausstellung der deutschen Wirtschaft und Kultur in China schuf. Ihre einfachen Grundformen baute er aus raffinierten Konstruktionen auf, deren leichte, tragende Strukturen von transluzenten Membranen für Decken und Wände geschlossen werden. Bambus erinnert hier nicht mehr an traditionelle Bauweisen, sondern steht ganz im modernen Kontext einer organischen Architektur von Baumeistern wie Santiago Calatrava oder Dominique Perrault. Zugleich entfaltet Heinsdorff mit seinen Pavillons – ihrem ephemeren Nutzen entsprechend – atmosphärisch leuch­ tende Environments. Markus Heinsdorff und seinen Pavillonbauten begegnete ich erstmals 2008 in Guangzhou in China. Mit ihm und anderen Gestaltern verbindet mich eine wachsende Faszination für Bambus als überaus effizientem und vielseitigem Werkstoff. Seit der Gründung des Vitra Design Museums versuchen wir, mit ungewöhnlichen Themen und Neuentdeckungen unseren Blick auf Design und Architektur zu hin- terfragen und zu erweitern. Eine Möglichkeit dazu bot sich, als mich der kolumbia- nische Museumsdirektor José Ignacio Roca 1996 in Bogotá mit dem Architekten Simón Vélez bekannt machte. Nachdem er uns in seinem Apartment im dritten Stock eines städtischen Wohnblocks empfangen hatte, führte uns Vélez durch ein Fenster und über eine Hängebrücke in weitere Räume, die er sich aus Bambusroh- ren in einem mitten in der Stadt wuchernden Dschungel geschaffen hatte – ein Reich zum Träumen und Planen von neuen Projekten. Vélez’ Bambusarchitektur, die ich in den folgenden Tagen auch in Form von Sozial- bauten, Villen und Clubanlagen für wohlhabende Städter und einem Aussichtsturm kennenlernte, hat mich sofort begeistert, weil sie die konstruktiven Möglichkeiten des Materials durch Verbindungen mit Betonfüllungen in den Rohren ebenso einfach wie intelligent nutzt. Über Vélez erfuhr ich auch von jener weltweiten Fangemein- de, die in Foren und Projekten zwischen Bogotá, Bali, Hongkong und Mitteleuropa an der Erforschung von Bambus und seinen Nutzungsmöglichkeiten arbeitet und der ich mich bald anschließen sollte. Im Rahmen der Workshops, die ich gemeinsam mit unserem Museum auf der Domaine de Boisbuchet in Südwestfrankreich durchführe, realisierte Vélez 1999 seinen ersten Bau außerhalb Südamerikas: ein wie ein riesiger Sonnenhut weit auskragendes Dach auf Stelzen, das den ganzen Sommer über im Obstgarten des Anwesens Schatten spendete, aber schon im Winter desselben Jahres von Orkan Lothar hinweggefegt wurde. Dennoch entschlossen, die Stabilität des Baustoffs auch in Europa zu beweisen, errichteten wir gemeinsam bis 2004 noch drei weitere Bauten auf dem Areal – ein Wohnhaus, einen Konferenzpavillon und ein schwe- bendes Zeltdach am See –, die alle bis heute genutzt werden. Da dies die ersten modernen Bambusbauten in Europa waren, hatten wir allerdings etliche Klippen zu umschiffen. Die Beschaffung und Anlieferung des Materials ge- hörte noch zu den leichteren Aufgaben, auch wenn mancher Stab auf der Suche nach Rauschgift von den Zollbehörden durchlöchert und damit unbrauchbar gemacht war. Komplizierter gestaltete sich die Bauabnahme, denn da Bambus als Baumate- rial nicht zertifiziert war, gelang es nur mithilfe einer experimentellen Statik, die Funktionstüchtigkeit der Bauten nachzuweisen. Im Zusammenhang mit dem Länderpavillon, den Vélez für Kolumbien zur Weltaus- stellung 2000 in Hannover errichtete, brachte unser Museum auch Grow your own house heraus, ein Buch über Bambusarchitektur, das einer größeren Zahl von Architekten und Designern die Geschichte und die Möglichkeiten des Materials vermitteln sollte. Wir dokumentieren darin die Faszination für Bambus unter re- nommierten Designern und Architekten wie Buckminster Fuller, Frei Otto, Renzo Piano oder Arata Isozaki und zeigen die Verwendung des Materials für Konstrukti- onen aus Gitterschalen oder in Hightech-Verbundwerkstoffen ebenso wie seine unterschiedlichen kulturellen Verankerungen. Bambus gilt längst nicht mehr als Material des „armen Mannes“ und findet in immer neuen Bereichen Anwendung. Es gibt Bambus-Fertigparkett, Bambus-Möbel, Bambus-Verbundwerkstoffe, ja selbst Teppiche aus Bambusfasern, die den Glanz und die Haptik von Seide haben. Diese Vielseitigkeit macht Bambus auch als Werkstoff in unseren Workshops in Boisbuchet so wertvoll. Für die dort entstehende Architektur aber, die ihren blei- benden Eindruck hinterlässt, zählt vor allem die Nachhaltigkeit, mit der dieses Material verarbeitet, eingesetzt und recycelt werden kann – nach einem Anbau und einer Ernte, durch die es ebenfalls weit umweltfreundlicher ist als die meisten herkömmlichen Baustoffe. In Boisbuchet, wo junge Designer und Architekten nicht nur kreative und technische Fertigkeiten erwerben, sondern wo – auf selbstver- ständliche Weise – auch ihre soziale und ökologische Kompetenz geschult wird, ­ist dieser Aspekt der Nachhaltigkeit von doppelt großer Bedeutung. Gleich nachdem ich auf Einladung des Goethe-Instituts Heinsdorffs Pavillons in China besucht hatte, war ich daran interessiert, eines der Gebäude für die Do- maine de Boisbuchet zu erwerben, wo nach Vélez auch schon der Ingenieur und Architekt Jörg Schlaich, der Japaner Shigeru Ban und die fränkischen Architekten Brückner + Brückner mit dauerhaften Bauten den innovativen Einsatz von Materi- alien und Konstruktionen demonstriert hatten. Heinsdorffs Arbeit würde dieses Ensemble, das die harmonische Wechselwirkung von Natur, Agrikultur, Kunst und Architektur thematisiert, wunderbar ergänzen. Zunächst aber lud ich ihn nach Boisbuchet ein, um dort im Sommer 2009 einen Workshop zu geben, an dem Studenten aus Asien, Europa und Amerika teilnahmen. Ausgehend von Experimenten zum Kennenlernen der Möglichkeiten des Materials, forderte Heinsdorff die Teilnehmer auf, Ideen für Gebrauchsgegenstände zu ent- wickeln, die sich vor Ort aus den unterschiedlichen Formen von Bambushalbzeug fertigen lassen. Die Bandbreite der Ergebnisse, die allein in dieser einen Woche zustande kamen, zeigte das enorme Potenzial des Werkstoffs: von durchscheinen- den Leuchten über Kohle als Schadstofffilter, verschiedene Spielsachen, Schmuck, Möbel und Musikinstrumente bis hin zum kompletten Baumhaus. Mittlerweile ergab sich die Chance, mehrere der insgesamt 22 von Markus Heins- dorff in China eingesetzten Pavillons zu übernehmen. Während einige auf der Domaine de Boisbuchet für Veranstaltungen und vielleicht als Empfangsgebäude des Geländes dienen sollen, werden andere von Boisbuchet aus an weitere Insti- tutionen gegeben. Ihren vielseitigen Nutzen, ihre Haltbarkeit im Dauereinsatz und im häufigen Auf- und Abbau haben sie bereits eindrucksvoll demonstriert. Doch diese Räume mit ihrer charakteristischen anmutigen Stimmung entfalten ihre Le- bendigkeit mit dem Wechsel des Lichts bei Tag und bei Nacht genauso wie in der Aufstellung an neuen Standorten. So wird Heinsdorffs Botschaft einer nachhaltigen wie auch fantasievollen Bambusarchitektur in die Welt getragen. German-Chinese House at night Deutsch-Chinesisches Haus bei Nacht 3 bambus — ein material der zukunft Alexander von Vegesack
  7. 7. the pavilions die pavillons
  8. 8. 18 19 There is a beautiful logic to it. The wonderfully lightweight bamboo structures in which the industrial countries Germany and China jointly presented the possibilities of sustained alternative designing and building at EXPO 2010 in Shanghai were developed not by a conventionally trained architectural team but by a creative in- ventor and artist. Few architects and college engineers in the ecological sector venture to take the step into the future in construction. Though there are profes- sors at a number of important universities in Europe, America and Asia who – like Frei Otto in Stuttgart – have had a close look at alternative building materials, includ- ing bamboo, a tradition of working with these materials has yet to establish itself. It is therefore not surprising that the proposal to construct bamboo pavilions that could be easily erected and dismantled for a touring exhibition in China came from someone who is not encumbered with the baggage of the architectural fraternity. Before he went to China, German artist, designer, photographer and design engineer Markus Heinsdorff had experimented with bamboo on various levels in other parts of Asia and had come up with highly poetic structures using the material in almost playful fashion – but also demanding high technical performance from it. Almost all the sculptural works that he did for museum or gallery exhibitions and public space as an artist can be described as technically ambitious installations that time and again used aids alien to art: organic materials or technically advanced appliances. These art objects are looked at elsewhere in this book. Here, we explore various types of utilitarian building that Heinsdorff has constructed with bamboo in China since 2007. The occasion for the experiment with bamboo as a building material was the Ger- man Esplanade, a touring exhibition subtitled ‘Germany and China – Moving Ahead Together’, which was put on successively in five Chinese megacities. This series of events, in which proposed solutions for future problems were presented and prominent German companies set out their ideas for the development of new technologies and ecologically sustainable processes, was initiated by the German Government, organized by the Goethe Institute and enlivened with an accompany- ing programme of cultural events and scholarly symposia. The fact that the head of the Goethe Institute in China, Michael Kahn-Ackermann, entrusted the design and visible message of this joint show to a Munich installation artist has to be regarded today, after the success of the bamboo structures at EXPO, as a stroke of luck. With his decision to construct the various exhibition pavilions, which had to be dismantled, transported and reconstructed several times during the year, out of bamboo – an unrivalled, low-cost, ecologically sustainable, multiply recyclable and, to a certain extent, earthquake-proof building material, which had largely disappeared from modern Chinese construction practice – Heinsdorff pulled off a public relations triumph. But many hurdles had to be overcome to get that far. In 2007, when Heinsdorff presented his plans for the exhibition pavilions for the German Esplanade, there was some initial resistance among the co-organizers. The German exhibitors, ac- customed to the proven exhibition materials of steel, glass and synthetics, could not really see the natural Asiatic material bamboo presenting German technological firms in innovation-hungry China. But the success that the elegant, lightweight bamboo pavilions enjoyed in the great squares of Chinese megacities soon convinced the participants. Whereas the clumsy fair pavilions which some German firms had brought along came across as ridiculous among the technically highly equipped metropolitan buildings, the apparently insubstantial pavilions that Heinsdorff had erected out of an organic building material gave off an aura of avant-garde design in the futurist setting. Indeed, it would be no exaggeration to say that Heinsdorff achieved high-tech effects with components from nature. His inventions were palpably far more in keeping with the theme of sustainability that the series of exhibitions was devoted to than the competition with their imported showpiece architecture. As bamboo rods cannot exceed a certain length – even under ideal growing condi- tions, the fast-growing stalks of bamboo grass reach only a certain height – Heinsdorff had to invent structural forms in which usable parts of bamboo could be put to- gether to make sensible structures. In his first prototype, he started from a central support, a bundle of parallel-positioned bamboo rods held together in a ring at the top and bottom by metallic elements. This was cleverly linked with the external supports by bars arranged radially from this pier, which in this way had to form a circle around the centre. In order to fit wall pieces between these external piers into the harmonious shape, Heinsdorff had the stabilizing crosspieces arranged like rungs between the external supports made of stable bamboo laminate and shaped in a curve so that, together with the external supports, they circumscribed a circular, open spatial structure that now needed only a sheath to form an impeccable closed cylinder. For this enclosing skin, which in fact acted as a façade and essentially determined what the pavilion looked like in the setting, Heinsdorff proposed a wide range of materials appropriate to the functions handled inside the structure. The fine silver or gold-tinted metal weaves that were used had an almost festive appearance in daylight but acted as filters towards the interior and therefore enabled the exhib- ited objects to be effectively illuminated during the day with spotlights. If these strips of metal weave were hung in parallel from top to bottom and drawn alternately in front of and behind the cross struts, like in wickerwork, the façade gained a vivid plasticity, with the chessboard pattern of light and dark surfaces offsetting any monotony in the even roundings of the structures. If, however, the pavilions were sheathed with translucent film or strips of coloured fabric, the interiors were filled during the day with a muted brightness, but still screened from the eyes of passers-by. At night, of course, light radiated evenly from the interior so that the buildings stood in the squares like large lanterns, imparting to the environment a vivid, painted-on message that in many cases actually made street lighting or square lighting superfluous. The effect of the bamboo pavilions was quite different again if, instead of the metal weave or translucent tent fabrics, completely transparent plastic film was placed around the frames. The structure was then open on all sides, and what was going on inside could be seen from outside by day and at night. If the metallic or textile skin was arranged as a double wall, air began to circulate between the two enclosing layers, so that the interior was tempered naturally. In order to stabilize his extremely lightweight, indeed delicate pavilion structures statically against all conceivable meteorological adversities, Heinsdorff got expert advice from various universities in Germany and China, and had the specially devel- oped fastenings and linking elements of his structural system precisely calculated. Thus the naturally grown, dried and carefully stored bamboo rods and the industri- ally made crosspieces and ribs of bamboo laminate were tied together with spe- cially developed metal fastenings to make statically highly robust units. But where the roof structure was exposed to particularly high pressure, Heinsdorff had short design from nature Gottfried Knapp Pavilions in Zhongshan Park, Shenyang Pavillons im Zhongshan-Park Shenyang 4 the bamboo pavilions of markus heinsdorff
  9. 9. 20 21 bars running diagonally, like those on an umbrella, from the vertical supports to the horizontal roof girders. And, as is the case with an open umbrella, the roof mem- branes were stretched over the load-bearing rods through vertically adjustable central piers and a steel frame running round the outside edge as weatherproofing that also allowed the rain to run off unimpeded. As variants of the circular shapes produced by a radial application of the bamboo rods, Heinsdorff developed various types of pavilion. The Navette type of pavilion is a combination of a large and small circle to make a drop-shaped ground plan, where the radially placed roof girders reach out from two central supports. The curved walls between the external support are marked at intervals of 35 cm by vertical poles that are linked with each other by cross struts of laminate, that is to say, they are designed like ladders. Within this regular grid of the façade, the en- trances can be placed virtually anywhere simply by removing individual poles and replacing them with longer cross struts, which act more or less as lintels. If two or three Navette pavilions are combined in parallel, the transitions between the docked parts can be opened over a wide front. The shape of the ground plan for the Diamond Pavilion is obtained by combining a large central circle with two smaller circles placed axially opposite each other to make a kind of parallelogram. It works very much like the Navette type, and can be assembled with similar coherence into larger units on the long sides. The Lotus Pavilion consists of three large circles arranged in a clover-leaf pattern that could, by analogy with Gothic tracery, be described as a trefoil. In this model, the roof skin is not pressed upwards across the central mast but spanned across the three supports in the centres of the three circles. The roof skin is pulled down between the circles on the centre support so that rainwater can collect there and run off visibly in the middle of the room, down a transparent Plexiglas pipe within this support. The circular Cathedral Pavilion is the smallest model in the series and has so far not been built. It manages without any kind of central support, relying instead on a dif- ferent structure. Shaped like a cone that gets noticeably broader higher up, it is formed of V-shaped external supports whose inner arms push up the radially shaped roof structure. The slightly diagonally sloping membrane roof is spanned over this star-shaped structure by a steel spindle in the centre of the roof, like an umbrella, to give it stability. With the large, oval Conference Pavilion, which offers a majestic 121 square metres of usable floor space without having to resort to a central support, Heinsdorff uses the same structural elements for wall and roof as in the Cathedral Pavilion. How- ever, the huge, oval roof surface is stabilized by being pulled down slightly in the middle and rising at the ends – from 3.6 to 5.2 metres – in a single elegant curve. The Central Pavilion is likewise circular but also without central supports, and again widens upwards like a cone. The bamboo rods here seem almost to stagger, clearly tilted outwards and at the same time placed diagonally, occasionally even criss-crossing. This allows the multilayered external wall to stabilize itself with the roof ring. The funnel-shaped membrane roof declines towards the centre, spanned so that rain runs out into the ground through a transparent pipe in the centre. Particularly at night, when the light shines through and makes the load-bearing structure visible from outside, the rods rising in irregular diagonals in front of the bright wall look alive, like a forest of bamboo swaying in the wind. With these five basic types of pavilion and a total of 22 buildings constructed, Markus Heinsdorff was able to lay out in an astonishingly natural way the varying spatial programme of the German Esplanade in public squares of very different dimensions and design in the five cities. Especially where closely placed rows of trees and garden features had to be taken into account, the small, round structures could be comfortably fitted into the gaps. In contrast, the clumsy rectangular exhibition pavilions made of steel and synthetics that some German firms had brought along for the first presentations involved chopping down trees and flat- tening flower beds, which obviously gave an awkward signal within the framework of an ecological exhibition promoting environmentally friendly techniques. Inside as well, the bamboo structures proved their worth. They had no dead corners, and could be used in various ways. They were visually easy for visitors to take in when they entered, and offered them a logically natural tour in a con- fined space. Heinsdorff achieved the peak of aesthetic finesse with the first presentation in a perfectly transparent Navette pavilion that contained the display of the region’s German partner state, Baden-Württemberg. A skin of synthetic fabric as clear as glass arched so incredibly perfectly and jointlessly round the gracefully round bamboo structure that, as a statically alarmed visitor, one involuntarily looked for fastenings that could keep together such a soaringly lightweight, almost ethe- real casing. Time and again, technically interested visitors were to be seen running their hands admiringly over the bamboo poles and the metallic structural ele- ments, which had turned a familiar natural product into an interesting design object, a piece of alternative high-tech. EXPO Scribbles EXPO-Vorentwurf 5 What makes Markus Heinsdorff’s bamboo pavilions unique is the complete freedom with which they can be positioned on, allocated to and combined to form large units on difficult terrain or sites with limited space. The aerodynamically curved roofs of the individual pavilion types – whose ground plans are all based on a circle, that is to say, on the most concentrated of all geometrical surface forms – can be neatly inserted into yawning gaps. Given that the entrances can be moved at will and installed as required anywhere along the skin, the pavilions can also be rotated in situ in every conceivable direction. And even the point at which two pavilions are lined up parallel against each other – to allow the partition wall to be opened up – can be varied to suit the site in question. Heinsdorff’s bamboo pavilion system therefore offers a number of possible variations that rigid systems cannot provide.
  10. 10. 22 23 Es ist von schönster Logik, dass der wunderbar leichte Bambusbau, in dem die In- dustrieländer Deutschland und China auf der Expo 2010 in Shanghai gemeinsam die Möglichkeiten nachhaltig-alternativen Planens und Bauens vorführten, nicht von einem konventionell ausgebildeten Architektenteam, sondern von einem technisch kreativen Erfinder, einem bildenden Künstler erarbeitet wurde. Den Schritt in die Zukunft – beim Bauen wagen ihn auf ökologischem Sektor nur wenige Architekten und Hochschulingenieure. Zwar gibt es an einigen wichtigen Hochschulen in Europa, Amerika und Asien Professoren, die sich – wie etwa Frei Otto in Stuttgart – inten- siv mit alternativen Baustoffen und so auch mit Bambus befasst haben, aber eine Tradition des Arbeitens mit diesen Stoffen hat sich dabei nirgends herausgebildet. Soist es nicht verwunderlich, dass der Vorschlag, für eine Wanderausstellung in China leicht auf- und abbaubare Pavillons aus Bambus zu errichten, ausgerechnet einer machte, der nicht mit den Vorurteilen der Architektenschaft belastet ist. Der deutsche Künstler, Designer, Fotograf und Konstrukteur Markus Heinsdorff hatte, bevor er nach China kam, in Asien schon auf verschiedenen Ebenen mit Bambus experimentiert und dem Material auf fast spielerische Weise höchst poetische Gebilde abgewonnen, aber auch hohe technische Leistungen abverlangt. Fast alle bildnerischen Arbeiten, die er als Künstler für Museums- oder Galerieausstellungen und für den öffentlichen Raum geschaffen hat, kann man als technisch anspruchs- volle Installationen bezeichnen, die sich immer wieder kunstfremder Hilfsmittel – natürlich gewachsener Materialien oder technisch ausgereifter Gerätschaften – bedienen. Während wir uns an anderer Stelle dieses Buches mit diesen Kunstob- jekten befassen werden, soll es hier zunächst um die verschiedenen Typen von Nutzbauten gehen, die Heinsdorff seit 2007 in China mit Bambus realisiert hat. Anlass für das Experiment mit dem Baustoff Bambus war die Deutschland-Prome- nade, eine Wanderausstellung unter dem Titel „Deutschland und China – Gemein- sam in Bewegung“, die nacheinander in fünf Millionenstädten Chinas gezeigt wurde. Diese Veranstaltungsserie, in der Lösungsvorschläge für Zukunftsprobleme präsen- tiert wurden und prominente deutsche Unternehmen ihren Beitrag zur Entwicklung neuer Technologien und ökologisch nachhaltiger Verfahren visualisierten, wurde von der deutschen Bundesregierung angeregt, vom Goethe-Institut organisiert und mit kulturellen Veranstaltungen und wissenschaftlichen Symposien angereichert. Dass der Leiter des Goethe-Instituts in China, Michael Kahn-Ackermann, die Gestaltung und Pointierung dieser Gemeinschaftsschau dem Münchner Installationskünstler anvertraute, muss man heute, nach dem Erfolg der Bambusbauten auf der Expo, als Glücksfall empfinden. Heinsdorff hat mit seiner Entscheidung, die verschiedenen Ausstellungspavillons, die mehrfach im Jahr ab- und wieder aufgebaut und verschickt werden mussten, aus Bambus zu errichten, diesem konkurrenzlos preisgünstigen, ökologisch nachhaltigen, beliebig recycelbaren, bis zu einem bestimmten Grad sogar erdbebenresistenten Baustoff, der aus der modernen chinesischen Baupraxis weit- gehend verschwunden war, zu einem Triumph in der Öffentlichkeit verholfen.   Doch bis es so weit war, mussten viele Hürden genommen werden. Als Heinsdorff seine Pläne für die Ausstellungspavillons der Deutschland-Promenade im Jahr 2007 vorstellte, gab es bei den Mitveranstaltern zunächst einigen Widerstand. Die deut- schen Aussteller, gewöhnt an die bewährten Messebau-Materialien Edelstahl, Glas und Kunststoff, konnten sich das asiatische Naturmaterial Bambus für den Auftritt deutscher Technologie-Firmen im neuerungshungrigen China nicht recht vorstellen. Doch der Erfolg, den die eleganten leichten Bambuspavillons auf den großen Plät- zen der chinesischen Millionenstädte einfahren konnten, überzeugte die Beteiligten bald. Während die plumpen Messepavillons, mit denen einige deutsche Firmen auftraten, zwischen den technisch hochgerüsteten Großstadtarchitekturen der Lächerlichkeit anheimfielen, entwickelten die scheinbar immateriellen Pavillons, die Heinsdorff mit einem natürlich gewachsenen Baustoff errichtet hatte, in der futuris- tischen Umgebung den Reiz avantgardistischen Designs. Ja es ist nicht übertrieben, wenn man sagt: Heinsdorff erzielte mit Elementen der Natur Hightech-Effekte. Dass er dem Thema Nachhaltigkeit, dem ja die Ausstellungsserie gewidmet war, mit seinen Erfindungen sehr viel besser gerecht wurde als die Konkurrenz mit ihren importier- ten Schauarchitekturen, war buchstäblich mit Händen zu greifen.   Da Bambusstangen nicht beliebig verlängerbar sind – auch unter idealen Wachs- tumsbedingungen erreichen die in kürzester Zeit aufschießenden Halme des Bam- busgrases nur eine bestimmte Höhe –, musste Heinsdorff Bauformen erfinden, in denen die verwendbaren Teile des Bambus zu sinnvollen Konstruktionen zusam- mengesteckt werden konnten. In seinem ersten Prototyp ging er von einer Mittel- stütze, einem Bündel parallel gestellter, durch Metallelemente oben und unten zum Ring zusammengehaltener Bambusstangen aus und verband von diesem Pfeiler ra- dial nach außen gehende Stangen geschickt mit den äußeren Stützen, die sich auf diese Weise zwangsläufig in Kreisform um dieses Mitte postierten.   Um nun auch die Wandstücke zwischen diesen Außenpfeilern in die harmonische Form zu bringen, ließ Heinsdorff die stabilisierenden, sprossenartig angeordne- ten Querstreben zwischen den Außenstützen aus stabilem Bambuslaminat vorfertigen und so kurvig ausbilden, dass sie zusammen mit den Außenstützen einen im Grundriss kreisförmigen, offenen Raumkörper umschrieben, der nur noch einer Umhüllung bedurfte, um sich zum makellosen Zylinder zu schließen. Für diese umschließende Haut, die ja als Fassade diente und den Auftritt des Pavil- lons in der Umgebung wesentlich mitbestimmte, schlug Heinsdorff recht unter- schiedliche, den jeweiligen Funktionen im Inneren des Gehäuses angemessene Materialien vor. Es kamen feine Metallgewebe in silberner oder goldener Tönung zum Einsatz, die im Tageslicht eine fast festliche Wirkung entfalteten, nach innen aber wie Filter wirkten, also auch tagsüber eine effektvolle Ausleuchtung der aus- gestellten Objekte mit Punktstrahlern erlaubten. Werden diese Metallgewebe in Bahnen parallel von oben nach unten gezogen und wie im Flechtwerk alternierend vorne und hinten um die Querstreben gelegt, bekommt die Fassade eine lebendige Plastizität, das Schachbrettmuster aus lichten und schattigen Flächen nimmt den gleichmäßigen Rundungen der Bauten jede Monotonie. Werden die Pavillons aber mit transluzenten Folien oder farbigen Stoffbahnen um- hüllt, füllen sich die Innenräume tagsüber mit gedämpfter Helligkeit, doch der Inhalt bleibt den Blicken der Passanten verborgen. Nachts freilich dringt das Licht aus dem Inneren so gleichmäßig nach außen, dass die Bauten wie große Lampions auf dem Platz stehen, der Umgebung höchst lebendig eine aufgemalte Botschaft mitteilen, ja in vielen Fällen die Straßen- oder Platzbeleuchtung überflüssig machen. Noch einmal ganz anders kommen die Bambuspavillons zur Wirkung, wenn statt der Metallgewebe oder der lichtdurchlässigen Zeltstoffe vollständig transparente Plastikfolien um die Gerüste herumgelegt werden. Dann öffnet sich das Gehäuse nach allen Seiten, und sowohl tags als auch nachts lässt sich das Geschehen im Inneren von außen verfolgen. Wird die metallische oder textile Außenhaut aber doppelwandig verlegt, beginnt die Luft zwischen den beiden ummantelnden design aus der natur Gottfried Knapp die bambus-pavillons von markus heinsdorff
  11. 11. 24 25 Schichten zu zirkulieren; der Innenraum wird also auf natürliche Weise temperiert. Um seine extrem leichten, ja filigranen Pavillon-Konstruktionen statisch gegen alle denkbaren meteorologischen Widrigkeiten zu sichern, holte Heinsdorff Gutachten von verschiedenen Universitäten in Deutschland und China ein und ließ sich die eigens entwickelten Halterungen und Verbindungselemente seines konstruktiven Systems präzise errechnen. So werden die natürlich gewachsenen, getrockneten und sanft konservierten Bambusstangen und die industriell gefertigten Querstreben und Stege aus Bambuslaminat durch eigens entwickelte Metallhalterungen zu statisch höchst strapazierfähigen Einheiten zusammengebunden. Dort aber, wo die Dach- tragkonstruktionen besonders starkem Druck ausgesetzt sind, lässt Heinsdorff wie bei einem Regenschirm kurze Stangen diagonal von den senkrechten Stützen zu den waagrechten Dachträgern aufsteigen. Und wie bei einem aufgespannten Schirm werden auch die Dachmembrane über den Trägerstangen durch höhenverstellbare Mittelpfeiler und durch außen an den Rändern umlaufende Stahlrahmen so gespannt, dass sie gegen Unwetter gesichert sind und der Regen ungehindert abfließen kann. Im Variieren jener Kreisformen, die sich bei einer radialen Anwendung der Bambus- stangen ergeben, entwickelte Heinsdorff seine verschiedenen Pavillontypen. Aus der Kombination eines großen und eines kleinen Kreises ergibt sich die tropfenför- mige Grundrissform des Pavillontyps Navette, bei dem die radial ausgreifenden Dachträger von zwei Mittelstützen ausgehen. Die gekurvten Wände zwischen den Außenstützen werden im Abstand von 35 Zentimetern von senkrechten Stangen markiert, die durch Querstreben aus Laminat miteinander verknüpft, also wie Leitern konstruiert sind. Innerhalb dieses gleichmäßigen Fassadengitters können die Eingän- ge fast beliebig platziert werden: Man braucht nur einzelne Stangen herauszunehmen und durch längere Querstreben, die quasi als Türsturz dienen, zu ersetzen. Kombi- niert man aber zwei oder drei Navette-Pavillons parallel miteinander, lassen sich die Übergänge zwischen den angedockten Teilen auf breiter Front öffnen. Beim Kombinieren eines zentralen großen Kreises mit zwei einander axial gegenüber- liegenden kleineren Kreisen entsteht die Grundrissform des Diamant-Pavillons, die einem Parallelogramm vergleichbar ist. Sie funktioniert ganz ähnlich wie der Navette-Typ und lässt sich ähnlich schlüssig an den Breitseiten zu größeren Einheiten zusammenfügen.  Aus drei gleich großen Kreisen, die einander kleeblattförmig zugeordnet sind, ent- wickelte Heinsdorff die Grundform des Lotus-Pavillons, die man auch in Analogie zum gotischen Maßwerksystem als Dreipass bezeichnen könnte. Die Dachhaut wird bei diesem Typus nicht über den zentralen Mast nach oben gedrückt, sondern über die drei Stützen in den Zentren der drei Kreise gespannt. An der Mittelstütze zwi- schen den Kreisen wird die Dachfolie so nach unten gezogen, dass das Regenwasser dort zusammen- und durch ein transparentes Plexiglasrohr innerhalb dieser Stütze, also mitten im Raum, sichtbar abfließen kann. Der kreisrunde Dom-Pavillon, der kleinste, bisher jedoch nicht realisierte Bau der Serie, kommt ganz ohne Mittelstütze aus, benötigt dafür aber eine andere Kons­ truktion. Der nach oben deutlich breiter werdende Konus wird von V-förmigen Außenstützen gebildet, deren innere Arme die strahlenförmige Dachtragekons­ truktion empordrücken. Das leicht schräg ansteigende Membrandach über dieser sternförmigen Konstruktion wird von einer Stahlspindel in der Dachmitte wie ein Schirm gespannt und so stabilisiert. Beim großen ovalen Konferenz-Pavillon schließlich, der stattliche 121 Quadratmeter Nutzfläche bietet, ohne auf eine Mittelstütze zurückgreifen zu müssen, verwendet Heinsdorff die gleichen Konstruktionselemente für Wand und Dach wie beim Dom- Pavillon. Die riesige ovale Dachfläche aber stabilisiert er dadurch, dass er sie in der Mitte leicht nach unten zieht und zu den Enden in einem einzigen eleganten Schwung von 3,60 auf 5,20 Meter ansteigen lässt. Ebenfalls ohne Mittelstütze ist der kreisrunde, sich nach oben konisch verbreiternde Zentralpavillon konstruiert. Hier sorgen die quasi taumelnden, deutlich nach außen kippenden und gleichzeitig diagonal schräg gestellten, sich teilweise sogar überkreuzen- den Bambusrohre dafür, dass sich die mehrschichtige Außenwand mit dem Dachring selber stabilisiert. Das trichterförmig nach innen abfallende Mem­brandach wird dabei so gespannt, dass das Regenwasser in der Mitte durch ein transparentes Rohr in den Untergrund abfließen kann. Vor allem bei Nacht, wenn das Licht nach außen dringt und die Tragkonstruktion sichtbar macht, wirken die vor der Lichtwand ungleich schräg aufsteigenden Stangen lebendig wie ein im Wind wogender Bambuswald. Mit diesen fünf Pavillon-Grundtypen mit insgesamt 22 realisierten Bauten hat Markus Heinsdorff das wechselnde Raumprogramm der Deutschland-Promenade auf ver- blüffend natürliche Weise über die ganz unterschiedlich dimensionierten und ge- stalteten Plätze der fünf Großstädte verteilen können. Vor allem dort, wo auf eng gesetzte Baumreihen und Gartenanlagen Rücksicht genommen werden musste, konnten die kleinen runden Bauten bequem in die Lücken geschoben werden. Für die plump eckigen Ausstellungspavillons aus Stahl und Kunststoff aber, mit denen einige deutsche Firmen bei den ersten Präsentationen angerückt waren, mussten Bäume abgeschnitten und Blumenbeete niedergewalzt werden, was im Rahmen einer Ökoausstellung, die für schonende Techniken wirbt, natürlich ein fatales Zeichen war. Auch im Inneren bewährten sich die Bambusrundlinge bestens: Sie kennen keine toten Winkel und lassen sich gut bespielen. Sie sind beim Betreten leicht zu überschauen und bieten den Besuchern auf engstem Raum einen logisch-natürlichen Rundgang an. Den Gipfel an ästhetischer Finesse erreichte Heinsdorff bei der ersten Präsentation in Nanjing mit jenem perfekt transparenten Navette-Pavillon, in dem sich das deutsche Partnerland der Region, das Land Baden-Württemberg, präsentierte. Eine Haut aus glasklarem Kunststoff wölbte sich so unfassbar perfekt und fugenlos um die zierliche runde Bambuskonstruktion, dass man als statisch alarmierter Besucher unwillkürlich nach den Halterungen suchte, die solch ein schwebend leichtes, quasi immaterielles Gehäuse zusammenhalten. Auch konnte man immer wieder beobachten, wie technisch interessierte Besucher mit den Händen bewundernd über die Bambusstangen und über die metallischen Konstruktionselemente strichen, die aus dem bekannten Natur- produkt ein Design-Objekt, ein alternatives Stück Hightech gemacht hatten. Zwischen den weit ausladenden Nationenpavillons auf der EXPO in Shanghai muss- te das zweigeschossige Deutsch-Chinesische Haus sowohl seiner ungewöhnlichen Materialien als auch seiner überraschend kompakten und doch elegant leichten Form wegen ins Auge fallen. Vergleicht man die Kommentare über die EXPO in den in- ternationalen Architekturzeitschriften miteinander, dann hat diese Weltausstellung, anders als frühere Schauen, für den Baualltag wenig erbracht. In fast allen optisch spektakulären Pavillons haben sich die Architekten lediglich um einen möglichst anschaulich und lebendig geführten Rundgang über mehrere Ebenen bemüht. Das ist bei Heinsdorffs bescheidenem, jederzeit wieder aufbaubarem Pavillon ganz anders. Er lässt sich vielfältig wiederverwenden. Und er macht Ernst mit dem The- ma „Ökologisches Bauen“, das wie ein Motto über der EXPO stand, aber kaum irgendwo überzeugend visualisiert worden ist. 6 Navette Pavilion and Diamond Pavilion in Zhongshan Park, Shenyang 6 Navette- und Diamant- Pavillon im Zhongshan- Park Shenyang
  12. 12. 26 27 Seen from above, the pavilion is shaped like a drop of water, developed from a large and a small circle linked with each other. The curvatures of the pavilion pro- duce a stable structure. The slightly inclined roof of white, translucent plastic membrane provides natural room lighting during the day, and spans the interior on two supports. These constitute a firm pier structure linking the horizontal girders via diagonally inserted bamboo spokes. The pavilion is entered via one or more flexibly positionable doors. The façade lattices of bamboo laminate are linked with the standing bamboo rods of the basic structure. Each structural element can be replaced individually. In der Aufsicht hat der Pavillon die Form eines Wassertropfens, entwickelt aus einem großen und einem kleinen Kreis, die miteinander verbunden sind. Durch die Run- dungen des Pavillons ergibt sich eine stabile Bauform. Das gering geneigte Dach aus weißer, transluzenter Kunststoffmembran ergibt bei Tag natürliches Raumlicht und ist über zwei Stützen im Innenraum gespannt. Diese bilden eine feste Säulenkons- truktion, die die horizontalen Dachträger durch diagonal eingebaute Bambusrohre verbinden. Der Pavillon ist über eine oder mehrere flexibel einsetzbare Türen zu betreten. Die Fassadengitter aus Bambuslaminat sind mit den stehenden Bambus- rohren der Grundkonstruktion verbunden. Jedes Bauelement kann einzeln ausge- tauscht werden. navette pavilion temporary locations: 2007 nanjing, 2008 chongqing, guangzhou, 2009 shenyang, wuhan, china permanent locations (since 2010): wuxi, anji, nanjing, xian, china 7 Navette Pavilions in Nanjing Navette-Pavillons in Nanjing Entrance Supporting columns Connection between two pavilions, with passageway Façade structure for smooth or woven coverings Woven façade, double-walled Zugang Stützsäulen Verbindungen zweier Pavillons mit Durchgang Fassadenkonstruktion für glatte oder gewebte Bespannungen Gewebte Fassade doppelwandig 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5 1 1 3 4 5 22 Floor area: 55  sqm Height of pavilion (façade): 3.7 m Highest point: 4.2 m Type of façade: single or double layer of interlaced (woven) covering Façade material: metal weave gold or silver-coloured, transparent polycar- bonate of fabric membrane Grundfläche: 55 qm Höhe des Pavillons (Fassade): 3,7 m Höchster Punkt des Dachs: 4,2 m Fassadenart: einlagige oder doppel- lagige, eingeflochtene (gewebte) Bespannung Fassadenmaterial: Metallgewebe gold- oder silberfarben, transparente PC- oder Stoffmembran
  13. 13. 8 Baden-Württemberg State Pavilion Länderpavillon Baden-Württemberg
  14. 14. 30 31 9 10 Navette Pavilion as exhibition room for the Goethe Institute 9 / 10 Navette-Pavillon als Ausstellungsraum für das Goethe-Institut
  15. 15. 32 33 12 11 Press pavilion with red fabric covering (woven into the double-walled façade) 12 Pavilion fixtures for an exhibition by the Goethe Institute 11 Pressepavillon mit roter Stoffbespannung (eingewebt in die doppel- wandige Fassade) 12 Einbauten im Pavillon für eine Ausstellung des Goethe-Instituts 11
  16. 16. 34 35 The pavilion was developed by Markus Heinsdorff as a climate project sponsored by the Federal State of Bavaria and installed on the German Esplanade in Canton. A partition wall, light, and coloured, translucent membranes divide the pavilion into two halves. The partition wall down the middle has a large air-conditioning appliance on it, by means of which one half of the room is heated with warm waste air and the other half is cooled. The point of that is to provide a first-hand experience of future ways of handling energy, with the need for action being light-heartedly underlined. The impression is reinforced by the transparent covering of red and blue PC façade membranes, backed up by the additional lighting. Text panels and monitors provide visitors with further information about research projects on the subject of air-conditioning, sustainability and energy efficiency in Bavaria. Der Pavillon wurde als Klimaprojekt und Kunstinstallation für das Bundesland Bayern entwickelt und stand in Guangzhou auf der Deutsch-Chinesischen Promenade. Trennwand, Licht und farbige, transluzente Membranen teilen den Pavillon in zwei Hälften. In der mittig verlaufenden Trennwand ist eine große Klimaanlage angebracht, mittels derer die eine Raumhälfte gekühlt wird, während die andere Seite sich durch die warme Abluft aufheizt. Damit soll das Zukunftsthema „Umgang mit Energie“ hautnah erfahrbar und der Handlungsbedarf spielerisch verdeutlicht werden. Sinnfällig wird der Eindruck durch die lichtdurchlässige Bespannung mit roter und blauer Polycarbonat-Fassadenmem- bran, unterstrichen durch zusätzliche Beleuchtung. Auf Texttafeln und Monitoren erhielten die Besucher weitere Informationen über Forschungsprojekte des Bundeslandes zum Thema Klima, Nachhaltigkeit und Energieeffizienz. clima pavilion – installation 13 1 14 13 / 14 Partitioning in the climate pavilion red = hot zone blue = cold zone with centrally installed air-conditioning system and air extraction (heat exchanger) 13 / 14 Raumtrennung des Klima-Pavillons Rot = heiße Zone Blau = kalte Zone mit zentral installierter Klimaanlage und Abluft (Wärmetauscher)
  17. 17. 36 37 diamond pavilion The Diamond Pavilion is a larger version of the Navette Pavilion. The design is evolved from the mirror image of the basic shape, and in top view can be seen to evolve from one large and two small circles. As with the smaller model, the curva- tures of the pavilion produce a stable, diamond-shaped structure. The roof mem- brane is fixed to an encircling steel frame. The roof over the three pavilion curvatures is shaped like an umbrella, and is spanned on supports of adjustable height. The ends of the roof membrane are attached to a steel tubular rail at the bottom by intersecting cables. The pavilion can be entered via one or more flexibly positioned doors. Der Diamant-Pavillon ist eine größere Variante des Navette-Pavillons. Das Design entsteht aus der Spiegelung der Grundform und ist in der Aufsicht aus einem großen und zwei kleinen Kreisen entwickelt. Wie bei dem kleineren Modell ergibt sich aus den Rundungen des Pavillons eine rautenartige, stabile Bauform. Die Dachmembran ist auf einem umlaufenden Stahlrahmen befestigt. Das Dach über den drei Pavillon- rundungen ist schirmartig geformt und wird durch höhenverstellbare Stützen ge- spannt. Die Enden der Dachmembran sind mit überkreuzenden Seilen an der un- terhalb befindlichen Stahlrohr-Reling befestigt. Der Pavillon ist über eine oder mehrere flexibel einsetzbare Türen zu betreten. 15 Daimler’s Diamond Pavilion along the Yangtse esplanade Diamant-Pavillon von Daimler an der Jangtse-Promenade Top view: pavilion, construction with three roof columns Section: pavilion Woven/interlaced façade (double-walled) Aufsicht Pavillon, Drei-Stützen-Konstruktion Schnitt Pavillon Gewebte/eingeflochtene Fassade (doppelwandig) 1 2 3 1 2 3 temporary locations: 2007 nanjing, 2008 chongqing, guangzhou, 2009 shenyang, wuhan permanent locations (since 2010): beijing, anji, xian, china 1 3 2 Floor area: 72  sqm Height of pavilion (façade): 3.7 m Highest point: 4.2 m Type of façade: single or double layer of interlaced (woven) covering Façade material: metal weave gold or silver-coloured, transparent polycar- bonate of fabric membrane Grundfläche: 72 qm Höhe des Pavillons (Fassade): 3,7 m Höchster Punkt des Dachs: 4,2 m Fassadenart: einlagige oder doppel- lagige, eingeflochtene (gewebte) Bespannung Fassadenmaterial: Metallgewebe gold- oder silberfarben, transparente PC- oder Stoffmembran
  18. 18. 38 39 16 17 Diamond Pavilion with bamboo motifs behind the transparent façade 16 / 17 Diamant-Pavillon mit hinter der Transparentfassade erkennbaren Bambusmotiven
  19. 19. 40 41 18 1 Underside view: membrane roof of white, translucent PVC foil weave 18 Untersicht: Dachmembran aus weißem, transluzentem PVC-Foliengewebe
  20. 20. 19 Diamant-Pavillon im Zhongshan-Park ShenyangDiamond Pavilion in Zhongshan Park, Shenyang
  21. 21. 20 Fassade mit eingewebtem EdelstahlgewebeFaçade with interlaced stainless-steel weave
  22. 22. 46 47 22 21 Central roof column with and without central steel tube (drawing) All joints with specially developed shell fastenings for bamboo rods that run into each other or lie on top of each other. Shells attached by means of pipe brackets Stretching the membrane roof across vertically adjustable prestressing columns Zentrale Dachstütze mit und ohne Mittelrohr (Plan) aus Stahl Alle Verbindungen mit eigens entwickelter Schalenhalterung für aneinanderstoßende oder übereinanderliegende Bambusrohre. Befestigung der Schalen durch Rohrschellen Spannung der Dachmembran über höhenverstellbare Spannstützen 1 2 3 1 2 3 21 Façade with interlaced stainless-steel weave stretched across horizontal ribs of bamboo laminate 22 Central column connected to six roof cross-beams 21 Fassade mit einge- webtem Edelstahlgewebe, über horizontale Bambus- laminat-Stege gespannt 22 Mittelstütze mit sechs angeschlossenen Dachtraversen 1 1 2 3
  23. 23. 48 49 The pavilion is made up of three circular elements with a single façade component. The three umbrella-style roofs consists of a white, translucent membrane spanned over four supports in the interior. Rainwater drains into the ground from the funnel- shaped membrane roof via a transparent Plexiglas pipe in the centre column. With the exception of the central dome, the whole roof inclination is minimal. The posi- tive and negative curvatures in the façade produce a stable, self-supporting wall system. All façade lattices of bamboo laminate are assembled without tools. Der Pavillon setzt sich aus drei Kreiselementen mit einer einzigen Fassadenabwick- lung zusammen. Dabei entstehen drei schirmartige Dächer aus einer weiß-translu- zenten Membran, die über vier Stützen im Innenraum verspannt sind. Über ein transparentes Plexiglasrohr in der Mittelsäule wird das Wasser von dem trichter- förmig gespannten Dach in den Boden abgeleitet. Mit Ausnahme der zentralen Kuppel ist die gesamte Dachneigung sehr gering gehalten. Durch die positiv und negativ ausgeformten Wölbungen in der Fassade ergibt sich eine stabile, selbstste- hende Wandabwicklung. Alle Fassadengitter aus Bambuslaminat werden ohne Hilfsmittel zusammengesteckt. lotus pavilion 23 Lotus Pavilion with gold-coloured façade of bronze weave Lotus-Pavillon mit goldfarbener Fassade aus Bronzegewebe Floor area: 142 sqm Height of pavilion (façade): 3.7 m Highest point: 4.2 m Type of façade: single or double layer of interlaced (woven) covering Façade material: metal weave gold or silver-coloured, transparent polycar- bonate of fabric membrane Grundfläche: 142 qm Höhe des Pavillons (Fassade): 3,7 m Höchster Punkt des Dachs: 4,2 m Fassadenart: einlagige oder doppel- lagige, eingeflochtene (gewebte) Bespannung Fassadenmaterial: Metallgewebe gold- oder silberfarben, transparente PC- oder Stoffmembran 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 Top view: Lotus Pavilion with 3 passageways and 5 roof cross-beams Rainwater runs off the pavilions via the central column Section: centrally lowered roof Side view: woven façade Aufsicht Lotus-Pavillon mit 3 Durchgängen und 5 Dachtraversen Regenwasser läuft durch die Mittelsäule des Pavillons ab Schnitt mit mittig abge- senktem Dach Seitenansicht mit gewebter Fassade temporary locations: 2008 guangzhou, 2009 shenyang, wuhan permanent locations (since 2010): shanghai, wuhan, china 1 3 4 2
  24. 24. 24 Herrenknecht’s Lotus Pavilion with gold-coloured façade Lotus-Pavillon von Herrenknecht mit goldfarbener Fassade
  25. 25. 52 53 25 The German Federal Ministry of Education and Research’s Lotus Pavilion Lotus-Pavillon des Bundesministeriums für Bildung und Forschung (BMBF)
  26. 26. 54 55 27 26 26 Fassadenabwicklung des Lotus-Pavillons mit Edelstahlgewebe 27 Lotus-Pavillon mit zentralem Regen- wasserablauf 26 Stainless-steel-weave façade component of the Lotus Pavilion 27 Lotus Pavilion with central rainwater downpipe
  27. 27. 56 57 A pavilion made of bamboo rods and bamboo laminates that is curved in varying degrees in terms of height. It has no central support. It widens upwards like a cone, the roof and interior heights being in the 3.6 to 5.2-metre range. The shape of the building depends on the location, varying with the twisted membrane roof. The basic structure consists of diagonally placed V-supports made of bamboo rods. Alternating silver metallic and white fabric weaves are woven into the inside of the façade structure to provide shade. Ein ovaler und in der Höhe unterschiedlich stark geschwungener Pavillon aus Bambus­ rohren und Bambuslaminaten, der ohne Mittelstützen auskommt. Er verbreitert sich nach oben konisch, die Dach- und Innenraumhöhen liegen zwischen 3,60 und 5,20 m. Die Gebäudeform verändert sich je nach Standort durch das in sich gedrehte Membrandach. Die Grundkonstruktion besteht aus diagonal gestellten V-Stützen aus Bambusrohren. Auf der Fassaden-Innenseite ist abwechselnd silbernes Metall- und weißes Stoffgewebe zur Verschattung an der Fassadenkonstruktion eingeflochten. conference pavilion 28 Conference Pavilion on Dali Tang Square, in Chongqing Konferenz-Pavillon auf dem Dalitangplatz in Chongqing Aufsicht des säulenfreien Konferenz-Pavillons mit Bestuhlung und Rednerpult, Haupt- und Seiteneingängen Seitenansicht mit horizontalen Stegen aus Bambuslaminat und Haupteingang (Doppeltür) Schnitt mit Dreieckkonstruktion aus Bambusrohren Top view: column-free Conference Pavilion, with seating and lectern, main and side entrances Side view: horizontal ribs of bamboo laminate, and main (two-door) entrance Section: triangular construction of bamboo rods 1 2 3 1 2 3 temporary locations: 2008 chongqing, guangzhou, 2009 shenyang, wuhan permanent locations (since 2010): boisbuchet, france 1 3 2 Floor area: 121  sqm Height of pavilion (façade): 3.6 to 5.2 m Highest point: 4.7 m Type of façade: single-layer or double- layer covering Façade material: transparent polycar- bonate membrane Grundfläche: 121 qm Höhe des Pavillons (Fassade): 3,7 – 5,1 m Höchster Punkt des Dachs: 4,7 m Fassadenart: einlagige oder doppellagige Bespannung Fassadenmaterial: transparente PC- Membran
  28. 28. 58 59 30 29 Connections between bamboo rods and with the floor construction (substitute foundation) Verbindung der Bambus- rohre miteinander und mit Bodenkonstruktion (Fundamentersatz) 29 / 30 Façade construction with single-layer poly- carbonate membrane, Stainless-steel-weave sunshade, inside; membrane roof of white fabric weave 29 /30 Fassadenkonstruktion mit einlagiger PC-Membran, Sonnenschutz im Innen- raum aus Edelstahlgewebe, Dachmembran aus weißem Textilgewebe
  29. 29. 60 61 31 Column-free conference room: interior view Säulenfreier Konferenzraum, Innenansicht Steel joint plate for the V-supports Section Bamboo rod connection Articulated joints for the horizontal connecting rods Knotenplatte aus Stahl für die V-Stützen Schnitt Verbindung mit Bambusrohren Gelenkverbindungen für die horizontalen Verbindungsrohre 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 3 42
  30. 30. 62 63 32 33 Conference Pavilion: roof substructure made of bamboo rods with steel connecting joints 33 Building-up of the façade, with polycarbonate membrane and tubular- steel frame for the membrane roof 34 Following spread: Conference Pavilion in Guangzhou Dachunterkonstruktion Konferenz-Pavillon aus Bambusrohren mit Stahl- Verbindungsknoten 33 Fassadenaufbau mit PC-Membran und Stahlrohrrahmen für die Dachmembran 34 Folgende Doppelseite: Konferenz-Pavillon mit Stadtsilhouette in Guangzhou Side view: connecting joints Top view: connecting joints Underside view: articulated joint Side view: connecting joints for V-supports and roof construction, and fastening of the membrane roof by cable tensioning View of the joints Seitenansicht Verbindungsknoten Aufsicht Verbindungsknoten Untersicht Gelenkverbindung Seitenansicht Verbindungsknoten V-Stützen mit Dach- konstruktion und Befestigung der Dachmembran über Seilverspannung Ansicht Knoten 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5 1 3 4 5 2
  31. 31. 34
  32. 32. 66 67 The circular, conical pavilion has no columns in the interior. Through the intersection and diagonal position of the bamboo rods, which create the appearance of a bamboo grove, the conical façade becomes a self-stabilizing wall and spatial struc- ture that also supports the roof, a funnel-shaped membrane. The buildings can be linked together and grouped with bridge-like suspended walkways. The light well of the membrane funnel in the centre also acts as a downpipe for rainwater, and is transparent. Der kreisförmige konische Pavillon ist im Inneren säulenfrei. Durch die Überkreuzung und die diagonale Stellung der Bambusrohre mit der Optik eines Bambuswaldes wird die konische Fassade zu einer sich selbst stabilisierenden Wand und Raumkons­ truktion, die gleichzeitig das Dach, eine trichterförmige Membran, trägt. Die Bauten können durch brückenartig schwebende Gänge miteinander verbunden und so gruppiert werden. Das Lichtauge des Membrantrichters im Zentrum dient dem Ablauf des Regenwassers und ist transparent verkleidet. central exhibition pavilion 35 Three central pavilions with connecting passages in Shenyang’s city park Drei Zentral-Pavillons mit Verbindungsgängen im Stadtpark von Shenyang Passageway of bamboo-laminate panels Side view: overlapping bamboo rods as roof and façade supports Durchgang aus Bambuslaminat- Platten Seitenansicht mit sich überschneiden- den Bambusrohren als Dach- und Fassadenstützen Top view of the roof ring and floor area Section: pavilion with funnel-shaped membrane roof, tensioning cables and central rainwater downpipe Aufsicht Dachring und Bodenfläche Schnitt Pavillon mit trichterförmigen Dachmembran- Spannseilen und zentralem Regenwasserablauf  Top view: combination of several pavilions with connecting passages Perspective section Aufsicht: Kombination mehrerer Pavillons durch Verbindungs- gänge Perspektivischer Schnitt 3 4 3 4 1 2 1 2 5 6 5 6 146,5° temporary locations: 2008 chongqing, guangzhou, 2009 shenyang, wuhan permanent locations (since 2010): in anji, shanghai, china 1 3 3 5 6 2 4 3 3 Floor area: 69 sqm Height of pavilion (façade): 4.7 m Façade material: bamboo and white woven membrane Grundfläche: 69 qm Höhe des Pavillons (Fassade): 4,7 m Fassadenmaterial: Bambus und weiße Gewebemembran
  33. 33. 68 69 36 Central pavilion on the Yangtse River waterfront in Wuhan Zentral-Pavillons am Ufer des Jangtse in Wuhan
  34. 34. 70 71 37 38 37 Connecting passage between central pavilions, also serving as entrance and exit 38 Interior with light well and central rainwater downpipe 37 Verbindungsgang zwischen Zentral- Pavillons, zugleich Ein- und Ausgang 38 Innenraum mit Licht- auge und zentralem Regenwasserablauf Regenwasserablauf als Membran (Plan) und als Plexiglasrohr (Foto) Membrananschluss Regenablaufrohr Bodenanschluss Regenwasserablauf und Anbindung der Dachmembran mit 5000 kp Zugfestigkeit und Gegengewichten (Betonplatten) in der Bodenkonstruktion Rainwater downpipe as membrane (drawing) and as Plexiglas pipe (photo) Membrane connection to rainwater downpipe Floor connection to rainwater downpipe; binding of the membrane roof with a tensile strength of 5,000 kp and counterweights (cement slabs) in the floor construction 1 2 3 1 2 3 1 3 2 1 2 3
  35. 35. 72 73 A conical, circular pavilion without central support. The building has a slightly tilted membrane roof that is spanned like an umbrella over a steel spindle in the middle of the roof. Supports and roof membrane are attached to an encircling flat ring of bamboo laminate at the top of the façade. The structure consists of diagonally placed, V-shaped bamboo-rod supports. The entrance is made by leaving out the horizontal façade elements in the succession of V-supports. Ein konischer, kreisrunder Pavillon ohne Mittelstütze. Der Bau besitzt ein leicht schräges Membrandach, das über eine Stahlspindel in der Dachmitte wie ein Schirm gespannt wird. Stützen und Dachmembran sind an einem umlaufenden flachen Ring aus Bambus- laminat an der Oberkante der Fassade befestigt. Die Konstruktion besteht aus diagonal aufgestellten V-Stützen aus Bambusrohren. Für den Eingang sind die horizontalen Fas- sadenelemente im Abstand der V-Stützen ausgespart. dome pavilion not realized / nicht realisiert Dachaufsicht Bambus- rohrkonstruktion mit Stahlstrebenverspannung Perspektivischer Schnitt Schnitt mit V-Stützen, Bambusrohrkonstruktion und Dachmembran Pavillonentwurf mit geflochtener Fassade Anschlussknoten Dachkante Top view of roof: bamboo-rod construction with steel-strut tensioning Perspective section Section: pavilion with V-supports, bamboo- rod construction and membrane roof Design for a pavilion with interlaced façade Connection hub at roof edge 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5 4 1 5 2 3 Floor area: 36 sqm Height of pavilion (façade): 4.1 m Highest point: 4.7 m Type of façade: single or double layer of interlaced (woven) covering Façade material: metal weave gold or silver-coloured, transparent polycar- bonate of fabric membrane Grundfläche: 36 qm Höhe des Pavillons (Fassade): 4,1 m Höchster Punkt des Dachs: 4,7 m Fassadenart: einlagige oder doppel- lagige, eingeflochtene (gewebte) Bespannung Fassadenmaterial: Metallgewebe gold- oder silberfarben, transparente PC- oder Stoffmembran
  36. 36. 74 39 Membrane roof Tubular-steel outer roof ring Central bamboo supports Bamboo roof cross-beams Bamboo façade supports Façade ribs of bamboo laminate Weave or membranes Floor panels and bamboo flooring Tubular-steel floor substructure Dachmembran Dachaußenring aus Stahlrohr Zentrale Bambusstützen Bambus- Dachtraversen  Bambus- Fassadenstützen  Fassaden-Laminat- stege aus Bambus Gewebe oder Membranen Bodenplatten und Bambus-Bodenbelag Boden-Unter- kons­­truktion aus Stahlrohren 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Navette Pavilion during the construction phase 39 Navette-Pavillon bei der Montage assembly aufbau 4 4 44 4 4 1 5 5 5 5 2 6 6 6 6 3 3 7 7 7 7 8 9
  37. 37. 76 77 40 Production hall for the pavilion structures Fertigungshalle für die Pavillonbauten
  38. 38. 41
  39. 39. 80 81 42 44 43 45 41 Previous spread: Central Pavilion during the construction phase in Guangzhou 42 Erection of the pavilions: assembling of the laminate ribs and bamboo-rod supports 43 / 44 / 45 Bamboo-rod construction, Conference Pavilion 41 Vorhergehende Doppelseite: Montage des Zentralpavillons in Guangzhou 42 Aufbau der Pavillons: Zusammenfügen der Laminatstege und Bambusrohr-Stützen 43 / 44 / 45 Bambusrohr-Konstruktion Konferenz-Pavillon
  40. 40. 82 83 47 46 Erecting the bamboo structures in Guangzhou. View from the stadium on Tian-He Square 46 / 47 Aufbau der Pavillon­ bauten in Guangzhou.  Blick vom Stadion am Tian-He-Platz.
  41. 41. 84 85 48 49 Erecting the Central Pavilion. Assembling the bamboo supports at the roof edge 48 / 49 Aufbau des Zentral-Pavillons Montage der Bambusstützen an der Dachkante
  42. 42. 86 87 50 Pre-assembled roof construction of the Conference Pavilion Vormontierte Dachkonstruktion des Konferenz-Pavillons
  43. 43. 88 89 pavilions and cities german-chinese esplanades: 2007 nanjing, 2008 chongqing and guangzhou, 2009 shenyang and wuhan 51 Esplanade on the Yangtse River waterfront in Wuhan Promenade am Ufer des Jangtse in Wuhan The German Esplanades were specifically designed and planned for selected public squares in the various cities. In the process, each of the pavilions and platform structures created a new and temporary configuration of urban space in the city’s parks and esplanades, or in the huge areas inside stadiums or town squares. The basic idea behind these buildings and their arrangement was to address the question of urban landscaping and to explore issues related to sustainable urbanization. To this end, the five stations were set up over a three-year period and involved a costly building permit and site planning procedure. Example: top view showing the German Esplanade on Dali Tang Square (People’s Square) in Chongqing Die Deutschlandpromenaden wurden eigens für die ausgewählten Plätze in den unterschiedlichen Städten entworfen und geplant. Dabei wurden mit den Pavillon- und Bühnenbauten jeweils eine neue temporäre Gestaltung der Stadträume in den Parks, Uferpromenaden oder riesigen Flächen der Stadien- oder Stadtplätze geschaffen. Die Idee dabei war es, mit den Bauten und ihren Anordnungen Stadtgestaltung und Fragen nachhaltiger Urbanisierung zu thematisieren. Dazu wurden die fünf Stationen in drei Jahren in einer aufwendigen Genehmigungs- und Standortplanung vorbereitet. Beispiel: Aufsichtsplan mit der Deutschlandpromenade auf dem Dali Tang (Volksplatz) in Chongqing. Navette Pavilion Diamond Pavilion Conference Pavilion Central Pavilion Culture Pavilion Stage Navette Pavillon Diamant Pavillon Konferenz Pavillon Zentral Pavillon Kultur Pavillon Bühne 1 2 3 4 5 6 1 2 3 4 5 6 1 1 2 2 34 56
  44. 44. 90 91 Upper esplanade on the Yangtse River waterfront in Wuhan Obere Promenade am Jangtseufer in Wuhan 5252
  45. 45. 92 93 53 Pavilions glowing in Shenyang city park Leuchtende Pavillons im Stadtpark von Shenyang Following spread: Pavilions in Shenyang city park 54 Folgende Doppelseite: Pavillons im Stadtpark von Shenyang
  46. 46. 54
  47. 47. 96 97 Was the bamboo used in the construction of the pavilions imported from Germany – this was the query of Nanjing’s awestruck mayor when given a tour in his city of the German-Chinese Esplanade at the first station of “Germany and China – ­­Moving Ahead Together”. “Bamboo huts” was what a German business representative disdainfully labelled the pavilions Markus Heinsdorff designed as part of the series of events called “Germany and China – Moving Ahead Together”. As contradictory as these two assessments may appear, they share the disbelief in the fact that a ‘cheap building material’ like bamboo could be used in contemporary, permanent and elegant construction. Apparently, it was equally difficult for the German manager and the Chinese functionary to imagine that a high-tech country like Germany would present itself with structures made of an old and natural prod- uct little appreciated in China today. The contempt felt for bamboo in present-day China is an expression of a loss of tradition and knowledge of its own cultural heritage. Bamboo possesses a diversity of symbolic meanings in traditional Chinese painting as well as in classical Chinese poetry. Bamboo painting developed into a genre of its own in the literati painting of the 15th century. Alongside the pine tree, the plum and the orchid, bamboo symbolizes the core human virtues of tenacity, elegance and vitality. It bends with the wind but does not become uprooted. Its leaves remain green even under frost and snow. “Man can live without meat, but not without bamboo,” is a quotation from the great Song Dynasty poet and painter Su Dongpo (1036–1101), simultan­ eously alluding to the immense diversity of uses that can be made of this grass. It can be utilized as building material and food, and as a basic raw material for agricultural implements, furniture, receptacles and textiles, to name just a few. The dramatic loss of knowledge and craftsmanship skills relating to the ancient Chinese tradition of bamboo architecture became painfully apparent to us during the preparation and staging of “Germany and China – Moving Ahead Together”. Nowhere in China were we able to find a single building contractor or construction expert with experience in working with bamboo as a building material and who could have helped us to overcome the many technical problems. One of Heinsdorff’s and the touring exhibition’s achievements is to have made architects and experts in the building trade aware of the potential of bamboo as a construction material. The decision to use bamboo architecture as the hallmark of the “Germany and China – Moving Ahead Together” series of events was made immediately after a first meeting with Markus Heinsdorff in the spring of 2007 in Shanghai. This decision remained a matter of controversy for some time, as the opening comments clearly show. The persistence with which we, as project management, kept to this decision was born of the conviction that it expressed the central aims of the project. Unlike the usual staging of national images abroad, whether as a “Culture Year” or other forms of presenting national achievements, “Germany and China – Moving Ahead Together” is not to be seen as a highly polished product of nation branding but rather as a platform for cooperation between the two nations and their cultures in finding solutions to meet their common challenges of the future. The goal of the series of events is the promotion of mutual understanding between the Germans and the Chinese as a basis for productive cooperation. It is this cooperative approach, a mutual German-Chinese ‘ownership’, that sets apart “Germany and China – Moving Ahead Together” from the usual national self-presentations essentially geared to each country’s own cultural wealth, eco- nomic power and innovative strength in technology. Nearly all of the events were staged on the basis of the cooperative planning and preparation by local Chinese and German partners. The series of events would have been impossible to mount without massive political, financial and logistical support from the provincial and municipal governments of each venue. Other distinctive features include the focus on ‘sustainable urbanization’, a future-related topic important to both nations; the close cooperation between political, business, academic and cultural institutions in the preparation and staging of all the stations of the exhibition; the mix of special- ist events for experts and those aimed at the interested general public; the choice of up-and-coming regional centres with, as yet, few international ties instead of saturated metropolises like Beijing and Shanghai. The centrepiece of each two-month station was the nine-day staging of the exhib­ ition on a public space in the centre of each city, the so-called German-Chinese Esplanade. The aim of the organizers was to create a “utopia of functioning public space” for China’s megacities. The achievements of the municipal and local administrations and, in part, of private investors in the construction of homes and streets, in public transport, in providing social, administrative and cultural infrastructures, in public safety, street cleaning and waste management, etc., are admirable. There are no slums in China’s mega­cities comparable to those in South America, Africa and in other Asian cities with more than a million inhabitants. There are shortfalls in the supplying of homes and services to the urban population, which are difficult to access and costly, especially for newcomers. The achievements of a city like Chongqing, however, whose population grows annually by half a million, are astounding, and the same holds true for almost all Chinese regional centres. The tremendously fast process of change, the massive pressure of immigration, the spreading commercialism in every aspect of life, the barely constrainable real estate speculation, the uncontrollable corruption and, last but not least, the long out- dated, stereotypical visions of a ‘modern city’ held by the political leadership and local administrations lead to the neglect of social and civic concerns in China’s megacities. A particular hallmark of this rampant deurbanization process is the reduction and deterioration of urban public space, which primarily consists of shop- ping malls, along with the symbolically central, usually deserted people’s squares, mostly dating back to the founding years of the People’s Republic. One problem confronting the cities is the loss of urban identity. It is just as much a casualty of the high number of immigrants from distant rural regions as it is of the unbridled destruction of traditional civic structures, material as well as social and cultural. The state, as the sole owner of land, is both victim and beneficiary of this process of destruction. The disappearance of segmented, urban neighbourhood structures like the hutong in Beijing, the longtang in Shanghai and in other major cities further south is fuelled by the unscrupulous speculation of state, semi-public and private developers and by the megalomaniac visions of urban development held by ambitious city leaders seeking to erect their own monuments with city expressways, skyscrapers and mammoth buildings, without creating new spaces for urban interaction and assembly. By ‘occupying’ a public place, such as squares or parks, in the centre of the city and offering information, entertainment, discussions, performances and gas- 55 Following pages 97 – 98: Evening view of the esplanade along the Yangtse River waterfront in Wuhan 55 / 56 Folgende Seiten 97 – 98: Die Uferpromenade des Jangtse Flusses im Abendlicht in Wuhan on the importation of bamboo huts Michael Kahn-Ackermann
  48. 48. 98 99 tronomy, the German-Chinese Esplanade seeks to create an inviting urban space open for participative encounter, without coercing the visitor to consume. The minimalist elegance and the anti-triumphalistic character of the pavilion architec- ture and its lack of any intention to overwhelm were deliberate and just as im- portant an argument for Heinsdorff’s concept as was the use of natural materials and the reusability of the pavilions. The idea was to create an attractive and thoroughly relaxing environment that would stimulate engagement in the contents of the pavilion. More than a million visitors taking advantage of this offer at the five stations is proof that it met with acceptance. The bamboo pavilions defined the appearance, function and atmosphere of the German-Chinese Esplanade. From a bird’s-eye view they often appeared tiny and downright helpless against the skyline surrounding them. Their power of attraction unfolded upon entry. Time after time, visitors would inquisitively run their hands over the bamboo construction and fabrics. They harmonized in a surprising man- ner with the presentation of advanced technology and systems solutions for issues of urban development, and were themselves a focus of interest. We were repeat- edly astounded by the long lines, primarily of young people, waiting to enter the three rotundas of the central pavilions, which dealt with topics like water pollution control, energy-efficient construction and renewable energy. In some cases, the structure and aesthetic of the pavilions resulted from their specific function. The idea of holding public conferences in the market place led to the construction of curvilinear, transparent conference pavilions, whose deli- cate bamboo structures surrounded even the driest lectures with playful charm. In the evenings, the bamboo structures covered with metallic fabrics or transparent PVC foil became luminous, radiating a muted glow that was an inviting contrast to the shrill LED walls and candy-coloured neon frenzy that illuminate China’s city centres. They were an enticement to take a leisurely stroll before the youthful audience crowding around the large stages of the German-Chinese rock festival erupted with energy. The fact that there was not one serious incident at any of the nine-day esplanades at the five stations, despite there being up to 20,000 youthful visitors at the evening concerts, testifies to the efficiency of the security authorities, as well as to the non-aggressive conviviality of the esplanades, to which the archi- tecture made its contribution. Not all of the pavilions were made of bamboo, which definitely served as an asset to the entire ensemble. The Chinese artist Li Jiwei’s ‘culture pavilion’ was virtually an antithesis. It was a tubular structure of steel and plexiglas, open at both ends. Every day it offered a different programme of public debates, readings, short per- formances and all manner of interaction with the public. Each day’s programme began with a thirty-minute German lesson for whoever happened to be there – a playful confrontation with a foreign culture. The ‘culture pavilion’ became a venue on the German-Chinese Esplanade that spontaneously, and often with touching emotion, lived up to its aim of cultural encounter, public dialogue and relating to the people. After the five stations, the question of whether “Germany and China – Moving Ahead Together” would also present itself at EXPO 2010 in Shanghai with bamboo buildings ceased to be an issue. Compared with the pavilions at the German-Chinese Esplanade, the ‘structure’, once again designed by Markus Heinsdorff, is monumen- tal. Compared with the other countries’ pavilions proudly proclaiming national greatness and innovative power, however, it is modest. And the people in charge were unwilling to concede that it could possibly remain in use for more than two months. But this shining construction of nature and technology will send a message, a message both simple and problematic, that we must learn to cooperate beyond political and cultural boundaries if we are to survive. Ob der für den Bau der Pavillons verwendete Bambus aus Deutschland importiert worden sei, fragte bewundernd der Oberbürgermeister von Nanjing, der ersten Station von „Deutschland und China – Gemeinsam in Bewegung“ beim Rundgang über die „Deutsch-Chinesische Promenade“. „Bambushütten“ nannte geringschätzig ein Vertreter der deutschen Wirtschaft die im Rahmen der Veranstaltungsreihe „Deutschland und China – Gemeinsam in Bewegung“ von Markus Heinsdorff entworfenen Pavillons. So gegensätzlich die beiden Urteile klingen, gemeinsam ist ihnen der Unglauben, dass man mit einem „Billig-Material“ wie Bambus zeitgenössisch, nachhaltig und elegant bauen kann. Für den deutschen Manager wie für den chinesischen Funkti- onär war es offenbar gleichermaßen schwer vorstellbar, dass sich ein Hightech-Land wie Deutschland mit Bauten aus einem alten und in seiner Heimat heute wenig geschätzten Naturprodukt präsentiert. Die Geringachtung von Bambus im heutigen China ist Ausdruck von Traditionsver- lust und mangelnder Kenntnis des eigenen kulturellen Erbes. In der traditionellen chinesischen Malerei wie in der klassischen chinesischen Dichtung besitzt der Bam- bus eine vielfältige symbolische Bedeutung. Die „Bambusmalerei“ entwickelte sich in der Gelehrtenmalerei des 15. Jahrhunderts zu einem eigenen Genre. Neben der Kiefer, der Pflaume und der Orchidee ist der Bambus ein Repräsentant zentraler menschlicher Tugenden, er steht für Zähigkeit, Eleganz und Lebenskraft, er beugt sich im Wind, aber lässt sich nicht entwurzeln, seine Blätter bleiben grün auch unter Frost und Schnee. „Auf Fleisch kann man verzichten, auf Bambus nicht“, lautet ein Zitat des großen songzeitlichen Maler-Dichters Su Dongpo (1036 –1101), der damit zugleich auf die ungeheure Vielfalt an Nutzungsmöglichkeiten dieser 56 über den import von bambushütten Michael Kahn-Ackermann
  49. 49. 100 101 Graspflanze anspielt: Baustoff und Nahrungsmittel, Ausgangsmaterial für land- wirtschaftliche Geräte, Möbel, Gefäße und Textilien, um nur einige zu nennen. Der dramatische Verlust an Wissen und handwerklicher Fertigkeit in Bezug auf die uralte Tradition chinesischer Bambusarchitektur wurde uns im Verlauf der Vorbe- reitung und Durchführung von „Deutschland und China – Gemeinsam in Bewegung“ schmerzhaft vor Augen geführt: Es waren in ganz China keine Baufirmen und Bau- fachleute aufzutreiben, die Erfahrung mit dem Baumaterial Bambus besaßen und uns bei der Lösung der zahlreichen technischen Probleme hätten behilflich sein können. Es gehört nicht zuletzt zu den Verdiensten Heinsdorffs und zu den Erfolgen der Veranstaltungsreihe, chinesischen Architekten und Baufachleuten das Poten­zial des Baustoffs Bambus wieder ins Bewusstsein gerufen zu haben. Die Entscheidung, Bambusarchitekturen zum Wahrzeichen der Veranstaltungsserie „Deutschland und China – Gemeinsam in Bewegung“ zu machen, fiel sehr schnell nach einem ersten Treffen mit Markus Heinsdorff im Frühjahr 2007 in Shanghai. Sie war, wie das Eingangszitat deutlich macht, lange Zeit umstritten. Die Hartnäckigkeit, mit der wir als Projektleitung an dieser Entscheidung festhielten, erwuchs aus der Überzeugung, dass sie den zentralen Anliegen des Projekts entsprach. Anders als die üblichen Veranstaltungen nationaler Selbstdarstellung im Ausland – seien es „Kulturjahre“ oder andere Formen nationaler Leistungsschauen –, versteht sich „Deutschland und China – Gemeinsam in Bewegung“ nicht als ein auf Hochglanz poliertes Produkt des „Nation Branding“, sondern als eine Plattform zwischenstaat- licher und interkultureller Kooperation zur Lösung gemeinsamer Zukunftsaufgaben. Ziel der Veranstaltungsserie ist die Förderung gegenseitigen Verstehens zwischen Deutschen und Chinesen als Grundlage erfolgreicher Kooperation. Von den im Wesentlichen auf die Präsentation eigenen kulturellen Glanzes, eigener wirtschaftlicher Potenz und technologischer Innovationskraft ausgerichteten natio- nalen Selbstdarstellungen unterscheidet sich „Deutschland und China – Gemeinsam in Bewegung“ durch den kooperativen Ansatz, eine gemeinsame deutsch-chinesische „ownership“. Nahezu alle Veranstaltungen entstanden auf der Grundlage gemein- samer Planung und Vorbereitung von lokalen chinesischen und deutschen Partnern. Ohne massive politische, finanzielle und logistische Unterstützung durch die Pro- vinz- und Stadtregierungen der jeweiligen Stationen wäre die Veranstaltungsserie nicht durchführbar gewesen. Weitere Besonderheiten sind die Konzentration auf das für beide Länder wichtige Zukunftsthema „Nachhaltige Urbanisierung“, die enge Zusammenarbeit von Institutionen aus der Politik, der Wirtschaft, der Wis- senschaft und der Kultur bei der Vorbereitung und Durchführung aller sechs Stati- onen, die Mischung von Fachveranstaltungen für Experten und bürgernahen Ver- anstaltungen für das interessierte Allgemeinpublikum sowie die Wahl aufstrebender, aber noch wenig international vernetzter regionaler Zentren anstelle der übersät- tigten Metropolen Peking und Shanghai. Herzstück der jeweils zweimonatigen Stationen war die neuntägige Bespielung eines öffentlichen Raums im Zentrum der jeweiligen Stadt, die sogenannte „Deutsch- Chinesische Promenade“. Absicht der Veranstalter war es, für einige Tage eine „Utopie funktionierenden öffentlichen Raums“ für Chinas Megastädte zu schaffen. Die Leistungen staatlicher und lokaler Administrationen und teilweise privater In- vestoren beim Wohnungs- und Straßenbau, beim öffentlichen Transport, bei der Bereitstellung sozialer, administrativer und kultureller Infrastrukturen, der öffentli- chen Sicherheit, der Straßenreinigung, der Müllbeseitigung etc. sind bewunderns- wert. Es gibt in Chinas Megastädten keine den südamerikanischen, afrikanischen oder anderen asiatischen Millionenstädten vergleichbaren Slums. Die Versorgung der städtischen Bevölkerung mit Wohnraum und Dienstleistungen hat Lücken, und sie sind vor allem für die neu Zugewanderten schwer zugänglich oder unerschwing- lich. Aber eine Stadt wie Chongqing, deren Bevölkerung jährlich um eine halbe Million wächst, leistet Erstaunliches, und das Gleiche gilt für nahezu alle chinesischen Regionalzentren. Die Geschwindigkeit des Veränderungsprozesses, der massive Zuwanderungsdruck, die um sich greifende Kommerzialisierung aller Lebensbereiche, die kaum zu brem- sende Immobilienspekulation und unkontrollierbare Korruption, aber auch die stereotypen, längst überholten Visionen der politischen Führung und der lokalen Administrationen von der „modernen“ Stadt führen andererseits zur Vernachlässi- gung sozialer und bürgerlicher Belange in Chinas Megastädten. Die Reduzierung und Verödung öffentlichen urbanen Raums, der neben den zumeist in den Grün- dungsjahren der Volksrepublik entstandenen zentral-symbolischen und für gewöhn- lich leeren „Volksplätzen“ vor allem aus Shopping-Malls besteht, ist ein Kennzeichen dieses wuchernden De-Urbanisierungsprozesses. Ein Problem, mit dem die Städte konfrontiert sind, ist der Verlust urbaner Identität. Sie ist ebenso ein Opfer der starken Zuwanderung aus entfernten ländlichen Regi- onen wie der hemmungslosen Vernichtung traditioneller städtischer Strukturen, materieller wie sozialer und kultureller. Der Staat als alleiniger Besitzer von Grund und Boden ist Opfer und Nutznießer dieses Zerstörungsprozesses. Getrieben von der hemmungslosen Spekulation staatlicher, halbstaatlicher und privater Immobili- enkonzerne wie von den megalomanen Stadtentwicklungs-Visionen ehrgeiziger Stadtregenten, die sich mit Stadtautobahnen, Wolkenkratzern und kulturellen Ko- lossalbauten Denkmäler setzen wollen, verschwinden die kleinteiligen urbanen Nachbarschaftsstrukturen wie die Hutong in Peking, die Longtang in Shanghai oder anderen, südlicheren Großstädten, ohne dass neue Räume urbaner Begegnung und Sammlung geschaffen würden. Durch die „Besetzung“ eines öffentlichen Raums im Stadtzentrum, von Plätzen oder Parks mit einem Angebot an Information, Unterhaltung, Diskussion, Performance und Gastronomie versuchte die „Deutsch-Chinesische Promenade“ einen urbanen Raum zu schaffen, der den Besucher zum aktiven Verweilen einlud, ohne ihn zum Konsum zu nötigen. Die minimalistische Eleganz und der Anti-Triumphalismus der Pavillon-Architektur, ihr Verzicht auf Überwältigung war Programm und ein ebenso wichtiges Argument für Heinsdorffs Konzept wie der Einsatz natürlicher Materialien und die Wiederverwendbarkeit der Pavillons. Entstehen sollte ein attraktiver Raum konzentrierter Entspannung, der zur Beschäftigung mit den Pavillon-Inhalten ani- mierte. Dass an fünf Stationen über eine Million Besucher davon Gebrauch machten, zeigt, dass dieses Angebot auf Zustimmung stieß. Die Bambuspavillons bestimmten Aussehen, Funktion und Atmosphäre der „Deutsch-Chinesischen Promenade“. Aus der Vogelperspektive wirkten sie oft winzig und geradezu hilflos gegenüber den sie umgebenden Skylines. Ihre Anzie- hungskraft entfalteten sie beim Begehen, immer wieder strichen Besucherhände neugierig über Bambuskonstruktionen und Gewebe. Auf verblüffende Weise har- monierten sie mit den im Inneren gezeigten Präsentationen avancierter Technolo- gien oder Systemlösungen für Fragen urbaner Entwicklung und waren selbst Ob- jekte der Betrachtung. Die langen Warteschlangen vor allem junger Leute vor den next page: Shenyang’s skyline, with the city park and pavilions in the foreground 57 Folgende Doppelseite: Skyline von Shenyang, im Vordergrund der Stadtpark mit Pavillons
  50. 50. 57
  51. 51. 104 drei Rotunden des „Zentralpavillons“, wo Themen wie Wasserreinhaltung, energie- effizientes Bauen und erneuerbare Energien abgehandelt wurden, versetzten uns bei jeder Station erneut in Erstaunen. Struktur und Ästhetik der Pavillons entsprangen in einigen Fällen ihrer ganz konkreten Funktion. Die Idee, auf dem „Marktplatz“ öffentliche Konferenzen zu veranstalten, führte zur Konstruktion des geschwungenen, transparenten Konferenz- Pavillons, dessen filigrane Bambusstrukturen noch die sprödesten Expertenvor- träge mit dem Charme des Spielerischen umgaben. Abends verwandelten sich die mit Metallgewebe oder transparenten PVC-Folien ummantelten Bambus-Strukturen in matt strahlende Leuchtkörper, einladende Gegen-Botschaften zu den schreienden LED-Wänden und bonbonfarbenen Neon- Räuschen, die Chinas Stadtzentren illuminieren. Sie verleiteten zum entspannten Flanieren, bevor sich die Energien des jugendlichen Publikums vor der großen Bühne des deutsch-chinesischen Rockfestivals entluden. Dass es während der jeweils neuntägigen Promenaden an fünf Stationen trotz bis zu 20.000 jugendlicher Besucher bei den abendlichen Konzerten keinen einzigen ernsthaften Zwischenfall gab, ist ein Beweis für die Effizienz der Sicherheitsbehörden, aber auch für die unaggressive Fröhlichkeit der Promenaden, zu der die Architektur ihren Beitrag leistete. Nicht alle Pavillons bestanden aus Bambus, und das diente durchaus auch der Bereicherung des Gesamtensembles. Der „Kulturpavillon“ des chinesischen Künst- lers Li Jiwei war geradezu ein Gegenprogramm: Ein schlauchartiges Gebilde aus Stahl und Plexiglas, offen an beiden Enden, das ein täglich wechselndes Programm an öffentlichen Debatten, Lesungen, kleinen Darbietungen und allen möglichen Formen der Interaktion mit dem Publikum bot. Jedes Programm begann mit einem dreißigminütigen Deutschunterricht für das zufällig anwesende Publikum, eine spielerische Konfrontation mit einer Fremdkultur. Der „Kulturpavillon“ wurde zum Ort der „Deutsch-Chinesischen Promenade“, der ihrem Anspruch von kultureller Begegnung, öffentlichem Diskurs und Bürgernähe unmittelbar und oft emotional anrührend gerecht wurde. Dass sich „Deutschland und China – Gemeinsam in Bewegung“ auf der EXPO in Shanghai wieder mit einer Konstruktion aus Bambus präsentieren würde, stand nach fünf Stationen nicht mehr zur Debatte. Verglichen mit den Pavillons der „Deutsch-Chinesischen Promenaden“ ist die abermals von Markus Heinsdorff entworfene „Struktur“ monumental, verglichen mit den anderen, stolz nationale Größe und Innovationspotenz verkündenden Länderpavillons ist sie bescheiden, und mehr als zwei Monate Lebensdauer wollten ihr die Verantwortlichen nicht zubilligen. Aber auch dieses leuchtende Konstrukt aus Natur und Technologie wird die einfache und zugleich schwierige Botschaft vermitteln, dass wir lernen müssen, über politische und kulturelle Grenzen hinweg zu kooperieren, wenn wir überleben wollen. 58 Following pages 105 – 107: Guangzhou’s skyline, with pavilions in the forecourt to the stadium 58 / 59 Folgende Seiten 105 – 107: Skyline von Guangzhou  mit den Pavillons auf dem Vorplatz des Stadions
  52. 52. 59
  53. 53. 60 Pavilions on “People’s Square” in front of Chongqing’s civic hall Pavillons auf dem Volksplatz vor der Stadthalle von Chongqing 
  54. 54. expo 2010 shanghai the german-chinese house das deutsch-chinesische haus

×