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Insights for Renewal

Insights for Renewal

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Insights for Renewal

  1. 1. Insights for Renewal – Summary and Next Steps
  2. 2. Overview COVID-19 poses one of the biggest challenges for a generation and together we've delivered rapidly for our residents. Camden is a curious council – which seeks to learn, improve and deliver better for its residents. As we enter the next stage of the crisis, there is a desire to create space to reflect, so we can take the right next steps. Some of this reflection is underway through this piece of work, other projects and within teams, and learning is being put into action. However, there remain four key, cross-organisational challenges. 1. How do we build on a shared sense of purpose and urgency for the future? 2. How do we work as staff for the future? 3. How do we work with the strengths of our residents and partners? 4. How do we better tackle inequalities? We recommend that these cross-organisational topics are taken forward and held at CMT level. These cross-cutting themes will work alongside other pieces of strategic development shaped by DMT and CMT such as the Economic Renewal Commission, Climate Emergency, Adult Social Care transformation and Education policy.
  3. 3. Meeting the Four Challenges: Highlights of some of the ideas • Initiate work across SLG to explore how different future scenarios could present new challenges & opportunities for transformation. • Finance to work across services to reassess individual MTFS projects. • Reflect on and refresh existing strategies and embed any new approaches to service delivery. • HR to support teams to take a reflective pause and identify the best approach for working going forward, on a team by team basis. • Support managers and staff on practical aspects as they embed ways of working in the medium-term, including on equipment and technology. • Communications to work creatively and collaboratively to share insights and build on Camden’s strong commitment to create a shared endeavour with staff. • Champion residents’ voice and experience when shaping services and addressing design challenges, in tune with their aspirations. • Take a consistent view across all services on how we work with residents: empowering communities and building resilience. • Elevate the role of data in designing services for the future. • Review the emergency response and understand the impact of a shift to digital provision on different groups of service users. • Implement the recommendations of Camden's BAME Inequalities group, identifying how we can extend it to other groups, including those at risk of poverty. • Use intelligence and data to understand and address the disproportionate impact that COVID-19 has had on different groups. • Empower and support staff from BAME groups, elevating their voices and providing a safe space to have ongoing open and honest dialogue. • Listen and implement their recommendations and commit to continuous organisational review and change. Challenge 1: How do we have a shared focus and prioritise to achieve Camden 2025 in a new context? Challenge 2: How do we work as staff in the future? Challenge 3: How do we work with the strengths of our residents and partners? Challenge 4: How do we better tackle inequalities?
  4. 4. Challenge 1: How do we have a shared focus and prioritise to achieve Camden 2025 in a new context? Camden 2025 remains our key strategic framework. Its ambitious calls to action are now even more important than before, as we know that the pandemic has exacerbated inequalities in these areas. However, we also know that Camden 2025 doesn't cover everything. Other challenges, such as the growing digital divide, have become starker during the crisis and the pandemic has highlighted, even more than usual, the critical role played by our core services and their importance to our overall purpose. Many opportunities have arisen from the services and approaches developed during the crisis but it has also created new, significant financial pressures for the Council, on top of those we were already facing. SC/CS DMTs highlighted the tension here between the need to invest and the financial challenges posed to the Council’s finances by Covid- 19. Linked to this is a consideration of the pace of our response vs. resident cocreation. This suggests a need (echoed at DMTs) to reconsider and prioritise which issues and projects we focus on, to ensure they reflect the new context we're working within. PH DMT was also keen that we shouldn't forget the potential for second waves or local lockdowns, as we start to look towards recovery.
  5. 5. There are opportunities to be more radical and drive change: • How can we ensure that changes to our policies and services reflect: • Political priorities; increased inequalities; and our staff's and communities' strengths: • Delivering a balanced budget despite continued pressures; • The social value of our local organisations, providers and institutions; • The need to anticipate future scenarios, being able to flex to change • Where we should lead, collaborate or empower others to lead • How do we take forward the cross-organisational theme of the digital divide? • How do we reprioritise the issues and projects we focus on together, e.g. new Our Camden Plan • How do we balance the need to urgently drive change to meet our goals and our principles of resident involvement? There are some key practical areas being taken forward or proposed: • Many individual teams are already looking at changes to their strategies or are embedding new approaches to service delivery into the way they work. • We suggest assessing potential impacts on individual MTFS projects, to understand our financial position and help move forward with individual projects, supported by Finance • We propose facilitating activity with SLG and Heads of Service to explore how we anticipate future scenarios and horizons (building on the Camden-Lambeth CMTs work) to identify new challenges and opportunities to drive transformation Challenge 1: How do we have a shared focus and prioritise to achieve Camden 2025 in a new context?
  6. 6. Challenge 2: How do we work as staff in the future? Covid-19 has radically changed how we work as staff, presenting both new opportunities and challenges. Increased remote working, a greater flexibility in roles and increased working together were all areas people wanted to build on. Improvements in technology and support from managers were areas to be developed further. However, clear too was the impact on certain staff groups – including those with caring responsibilities, or with health needs – and how we adapt to accommodate their needs in this new environment. We also heard from PH DMT that there is a risk that people are already starting to return to old ways of working. They identified a need to support people to embed new ways of working and understand that we can't return to the past, whilst helping people feel secure. CS DMT highlighted a need to give people opportunities to bring ideas and shape the way forward, rather than just doing this at higher levels - this may include creating opportunities for people from any part of the organisation to work together on practical challenges.
  7. 7. Challenge 2: How do we work as staff in the future? There are some key practical areas being taken forward:​ • HR&OD are working with Digital to look at the equipment and technology needed to support people to work safely. • HR&OD developing support tools for managers to support staff. • Work to bring staff back to the office through our service transition work and COVID-secure, supported by HR&OD, systems thinking and facilities. • Supporting teams to take a reflective pause so we can help our teams reflect on the journey we’re on and improve, supported by HR&OD. • We suggest working with Communications to use creative ways to share these insights with staff as a way for the learning to stimulate improvement. • Take forward the recommendations from GOLD on 15 June on changes to workstreams and reporting. There are opportunities to be more radical and drive change: • What is the future role of our offices if many of us continue to work more remotely? How can we help remote working feel more like the office? • How can we build the connections or structures between teams to collaborate? • How could we change the principles of how we work, with the tools and support to do this. For example, working in the open and collaboratively, rhythms and working patterns, involving people in developing ideas and solutions.​ • What changes are needed to help managers support staff? • How can we build on our redeployment hub to better allocate people to projects that makes the best use of everyone’s skills?
  8. 8. Challenge 3: How do we work with the strengths of our residents and partners? There has been a significant impact on the community, residents and partners as a result of COVID-19 – which many services are concerned about. This included a concern over the digital divide and its impact on residents as more services moved online. This insight work was only intended to focus on understanding the experience of services. Therefore, we need to work with residents and partners to start from their experiences and motivations on how best to work with them. It was also noted by DMTs that it is harder for staff to connect to residents and their experience in Camden, as so many do not live in the borough. The role of data in helping us understand services was highlighted by services and echoed at SP DMT, where it was felt there was a need to use data more proactively and to improve digital services. There was concern from some that the pace of the pandemic response meant that services had been developed without co-creation with residents, which risked creating a dependency on the council and moved away from the strengths-based approach. This was echoed through conversations at PH and SP DMTs. There was some desire to embed the strengths-based approach across the council further – for example, Contact Camden highlighted that they had learnt the benefits of using strengths-based conversations with residents during the pandemic. Many have also found strengthened partnerships - from Coroners, to Schools, and Public Health. Several services spoke about the role of the VCS in supporting people during the crisis and a desire to build on this. Though there is some concern about the wider and financial impact on many of our partners.
  9. 9. Challenge 3: How do we work with the strengths of our residents and partners? There are some key practical areas being taken forward:​ • Learning from the experiences of our residents to identify and work on design challenges that address their aspirations, supported by the Inclusive Innovation Network and Participation. • Resident involvement is being further developed within teams – for example, the Economic Renewal Commission. • Some teams are also developing their use of data - for example, Adult Social Care – who are exploring the evidence and data to inform their next steps. There are opportunities to be more radical and drive change: • Can we look at a day in the lives of our residents, to help us empathise with their experiences? • How can we commit to the principle of strength-based conversations across the council and how could we embed this? • How can we build on our strengthened partnerships to mobilise the social value of our providers and partners? • How can we develop local government as a platform to match needs and support? • What is the right balance of face-to-face and digital provision? • How can we more radically use data to inform our work?
  10. 10. Challenge 4: How do we better tackle inequalities? Services across the Council identified the damage that COVID-19 has done to outcomes for residents across Camden 2025 priorities, including education, health and financial resilience. Many identified how existing inequalities will be exacerbated by the crisis. Despite this, not all services fully considered the disproportionate impact of COVID-19 on some communities, including those with protected characteristics as well as other groups, nor how their services could or should respond. In some services, work is already underway to understand how they best serve residents by tackling inequality – for example, improving digital access, and building resilience particularly given the risk of a second wave. However, in others, the pace of delivery meant that these considerations are still to be made. The resident and staff voice is central as we recover and renew. Certain staff have been particularly impacted by COVID-19, including those with caring responsibilities, staff from BAME groups, and those with health conditions. At the same time, other staff groups continue to work remotely, away from the residents they serve. SP DMT identified tackling inequality as a priority and called for a resource injection to help address it.
  11. 11. Challenge 4: How do we better tackle inequalities? There are some key practical areas being taken forward:​ • Camden's BAME Inequalities and COVID-19 working group has a focus on 8 key areas and will publish the framework for its action plan the week beginning 22 June. This includes short-, medium- and long-term action plans to help empower residents and partners, and to proactively address inequality, including within Camden's workforce. • Public Health BAME COVID-19 Health Inequalities work – using intelligence and analysis of data. • Work is also being taken forward in some teams, such as Adult Social Care's detailed analysis on disproportionate impact on residents with protected characteristics and Education's framework to tackle some impacts on young people and families. • Reflection sessions with different staff groups – for example, ongoing focus groups with BAME staff. There are opportunities to be more radical and drive change: •How can we extend the approach taken to the BAME Disproportionality Project to other groups who are more at risk of poverty? •How do we embed assessment of the impact of inequality and use it as a source of innovation? •How could we use the collective creativity of our partners to help us tackle this? •How could we provide dedicated support to help the organisation improve our approach in this area?
  12. 12. These challenges also point to principles which have been used and which can be used in our next steps as a council: • With Camden 2025 as our guiding star, we will need to prioritise what we deliver over the next year, reflecting the strengths & needs of our residents and our ability to deliver a balanced budget. • Many of the key opportunities that services think should be amplified were started pre-Covid 19 and can be accelerated. • We will need to build on the shared sense of purpose and urgency to energise people to work across teams on shared challenges. • We will need to work together across services to adapt and identify where we are best placed to lead, collaborate, or support others to lead. • Our residents face changing needs that can be invisible, we need to better value their creativity and strengths in tackling those. • We need to empower people closest to the problem to tackle these issues. • We will need to continue embedding digital into how we work and rethink how we use our physical spaces in this new normal. • Even though Covid-19 is still with us, there's an opportunity to move from working at the pace of the emergency to work at the pace of our communities, to involve people in an inclusive way. Principles
  13. 13. Areas for discussion • Are these four areas the cross-organisational challenges to tackle at a CMT level? • If so, • How can we take these forward in a collaborative and iterative way? • How radical do we want to be on each of these? • What support does CMT need to take these forward? Camden has experience of facilitating collaborative ways of tackling these types of issues which it could build on for this (e.g. External Challenges, IIN)
  14. 14. Summary of all report findings
  15. 15. Areas of focus We’ve worked with services on the following areas to: • Understand the impact of the pandemic and lessons learned • Identify challenges and opportunities for the future • Identify what they stop, continue or do differently We did this through: • Using new software to allow us to 'tag' the responses – there were over 110 different categories and almost 3,000 individual comments. • Workshops with those completing the returns or carrying out connected work, and the renewal group. • Feedback and discussion at all 4 DMTs Impact on residents and communities Working with partners Impact on staff and ways of working Impact on our services so far Considerations for reopening services Benefits and opportunities for recovery and renewal Financial impact
  16. 16. 1. Impact on residents & communities • There has been a significant impact on the community as a result of COVID-19 and the government’s response to this. • There is concern across services about the damage being done to outcomes across Camden 2025 priorities including education, climate change, health and financial resilience and the likelihood that existing inequalities will worsen. • These new impacts have significantly altered the context for how we may achieve Camden 2025. • Residents have adapted quickly to changes in services over the past few months. • There is concern that the pandemic could result in greater socio-economic need in our communities, raising questions around the shape and offer of services especially at the front door in the future. • This included concern over an increasing digital divide • There is concern that in the medium term the pandemic could result in a greater demand for services beyond the resources available to us. • Some reflected on the need to think carefully about our role within a wider state and system–and the importance of empowering residents and building on assets and strengths in our communities rather than focus on deficits and risk unintentionally creating dependency on services
  17. 17. 1. Impact on residents & communities "Closing of schools has significant cross cutting implications for Camden 2025 and especially for protected groups […] gap between outcomes and experience that reflect socioeconomic difference. A Supporting People team "COVID-19 will have a long-lasting impact on our residents and communities both in terms of our current understanding of needs and ensuring we factor in some of the new implications as we deliver outcomes of Camden 2025 and our Camden Plan. […] residents' needs are changing bringing with it added complexity. We believe that by working with people and using data we can design personalised services to meet these more complex needs" A Corporate Services team "Local markets and street markets increasingly becoming community hubs. Increased take-up of recycling too and helping local places keep clean. A greater emphasis to be placed on good growth at local level. Residents have become `rule-takers' following guidance with greater amounts of recycling" A Supporting Communities team “The digital divide is even bigger, since many services have had to move online since lockdown. Our libraries already provided services for those who could not access Universal Credit and council housing online. People with no digital access are having to access banking, schooling, shopping, jobs and UC online” - A Supporting Communities Team Risk we undo progress made embedding strengths-based approaches and embedding asset-based community development, and that our council emergency response draws more people into the system and recreates a dependency culture” A Supporting People team “One key learning is around how we move from transactional customer service to strength-based conversations. Many of our residents (included the Shielded) are capable of supporting themselves with the right guidance and signposting from Camden" A Corporate Services team
  18. 18. Camden 2025​ Current priorities surfaced from services​ Homes and housing​ Reducing homelessness, landlord & estate services, organisational approach to asset management, CIP, resident safety charter​ Strong growth &access to jobs​ Renewal Commission: transition to a zero-carbon economy, good work for all, welfare that works for people, thriving local economy​, commercial portfolio Safe, strong and open communities​ Community safety, cohesion and disproportionality, sustainability of VCS and mobilising volunteers, tackling the digital divide, educational attainment, domestic violence, youth safety​ Clean, vibrant &sustainable places​ Increasing walking and cycling, re-opening place- based services and physical and open spaces, climate emergency​ Healthy, independent lives​ Strengths-based practice, assistive technology, adults neighbourhood working, older people’s housing, extra care, support and safeguarding, contact and trace​
  19. 19. 2. Working with partners • Relationships have been strengthened across directorates with shared objectives and mutual understanding – regionally, with health partners, the VCS, and in some cases with government. • The role of Camden’s VCS was highlighted by many in providing vital services, with opportunities to work together in the future • Some identified Camden's position as a system leader in touch with residents and the voluntary sector, but recognising when to let others take the lead or to signpost to additional support. • Improved perception of the credibility and influence of the Council – taken a lead on lobbying. • Some have benefited from increased communication and new approaches to working –including a move away from emails towards more conversations and video calling. • Recognition of a changing environment with funding challenges are likely to impact our partners going forward
  20. 20. "Constructive & positive engagement and collaboration with providers has been essential. Their involvement and engagement has been fantastic and close working should be maintained. […] [We] can build on this for future integration and keeping people out of hospital." A Supporting People team "New connections with colleagues across [North London Councils] has opened doors and increased the ability to influence decision making beyond the council" A Supporting People team "Embracing what our external contractors can bring beyond what is contractually available. We have been able to repurpose our main contractor's staff to a number of roles and they have really benefitted from gaining an insight to the borough in which they work and speaking with residents they would not normally meet. [We should] increase [the] social value element in future contracts." A Supporting Communities team "Rapid design and delivery of integrated wrap around service provision between services, agencies and VCS to support vulnerable population groups […] a focus on what is possible rather than impossible, united around a shared urgent mission."​ Public Health "We are going to have to recognise that whole sectors we work with [...] will now operate in a different way. In helping our clients respond [we must] ensure we learn from and share experience of other councils and agencies, rather than working in a silo." A Corporate Services team "VCS provide a wide range of key services to the community, especially to parts of the community no one else reaches. Many of these organisations are running at reduced capacity and have seen significant decreases in income/funding and their ability to deliver these key services now and in the future is reduced […] In response to the new patterns of vulnerability, the community itself has started organising, with Mutual Aid groups and informal community groups alike." A Supporting Communities team
  21. 21. 3. Impact on staff and ways of working • Coronavirus has had a large impact on our staff –from the impact in people’s personal lives and how they are feeling, to shifts in ways of working together. • Staff are doing okay –given the context of the pandemic –though this is different for some groups. • There is a need for further work on supporting staff - whilst we have some great examples of supporting staff, some responses did not talk about this issue and others felt that COVID-19 gave us the opportunity to focus on staff wellbeing even more. • We have also learnt a lot about our employees’ skills, their ability to be flexible, as well as identifying where we may have some gaps. • There is a strong desire to work more together across the council and teams • The radical digital transformation in ways of working through remote working has presented both opportunities and challenges. • During sessions where people have reflected on the initial findings, people have highlighted how this radical transformation has had a significant impact on staff and the need to create space to support staff to reflect on changes and start to think about the future as no longer a return to the past structure.
  22. 22. “Since the lockdown we have behaved and acted more like the One Camden.” A Supporting People team With a focus on action and shared goals a lot of the barriers that have been in the system for a long time have been overcome. E.g. response for rough sleeping and the need to put in place systems to support people into accommodation and wrap around care.” Public Health “Continuation of regular contacts with providers [has ensured] they remain supported and are able to raise concerns. This has led to mutual understanding and improved working relationships. It is likely to have a positive impact on quality of care and responsiveness to the council.” A Supporting People team On a human level there has been a very real impact on staff. Staff that live alone, have childcare needs, or are vulnerable or worried about vulnerable relatives have had a difficult time. It is worth thinking through how we can best support staff through these issues in the future.” A Supporting Communities team “We have also learned that we need to check in with each other far more to make sure we are looking after ourselves. We do not do this as an organisation enough and we need to be more honest about that.” A Corporate Services team “most people welcome the significant ICT adaptations that have been brought forward to support remote working and would want to continue to have the flexibility to work from home in the future.” Public Health “Whilst everyone has coped brilliantly well with the move to remote working, it's clear we need significant time and energy to spend thinking about culture and thoughtful org design. Our current ways of working remotely are in response to a crisis-we must understand what is working and what isn't. A Corporate Services team
  23. 23. 4. Impact on services so far • Services acted fast in responding to the stark operational challenges posed by Covid-19 and many services managed to maintain (or even enhance) service levels, even if this meant working in a different way and or with a slightly different focus. • Given the unprecedented challenges caused by the pandemic, there were also some services that had to close due to social distancing, with libraries, leisure centres and in person day centres being some of the higher-profile examples. • New services set up fast – frontline presence team, redeployment hub, Covid-19 phone line. • Impact on some workforce levels - significant impact on service delivery in some areas due to high staff absence (e.g. adult social care), and challenges around PPE. • Impact on services’ capacity - e.g. adult social care and housing management. Feedback on how governance and the emergency structure has supported ways of working and the lessons we should take from this. • Some services have also seen a large increase for demand and back logs of work – for example delays in court work
  24. 24. "Service delivery of street cleansing, waste collection and recycling has proved fairly resilient." A Supporting Communities Team "Home care providers have experienced significant impact on a day-to-day basis as they manage care provisions with fluctuating staff levels of sickness and worker anxiety." A Supporting People team "Caretakers are currently working reduced hours to mitigate exposure risks; full working hours will need to be brought back" A Supporting Communities team "All Information & Records Management services have continued - a temporary reduction in service in some cases." A Corporate Services team "Work has continued but the service has had to prioritise external works to adhere to social distancing guidelines. Works such as window replacements... have had to be put on hold." A Supporting Communities team A number of new teams have been established
  25. 25. 5. Considerations for reopening services • Some services are reliant upon political decisions to be made as to when they should restart their service, and in what way. This also includes decisions around when to restart charging and collecting money, for example council tax and business rates, and how we will pursue this. • A number of services are dependent on decisions outside the Council's control • How the virus progress including a 2nd wave • How the economy reacts and progresses • What regional and national bodies and government decide. • There were also a number of key internal dependencies • When the office is COVID- secure and safe for staff to return • When staff who have been redeployed return. • From this, many anticipated a resource need.
  26. 26. “[…] we will carry out a further review of our transformation programme - to make decisions on priority projects which need to continue and/or restart, those which may need to be stopped or be re-thought.” A Supporting People team "Financial impact will depend on external factors which we need to anticipate & prepare for such how long the virus will last and what decisions the government will make on extending/reducing their financial support to councils, and [...] business rates" A Corporate Services team "Much relies on political decision making, at national and local level, before any decisions can be made within the service." A Corporate Services team "A key message for ASC is that the health crisis is not over. We expect there could be a second wave. And as a frontline service we need to carefully manage implications on residents and on the workforce." A Supporting People team "Stopping some of the activities in particular projects where there might be different views on prioritisation could be challenging, it would be helpful to approach this from organisational perspective to ensure short-, medium- and long- term objectives remain aligned across departments and services" A Corporate Services team “Running committee meetings remotely takes considerably more staff resource than running physical meetings […] If remote meetings continue, serious consideration needs to be given to either reducing the number of meetings […] or increasing the staff resource available.” A Corporate Services team "How we continue working to support those with no local connection and NRPF will be an MHCLG decision but critical that there are clear guidance from government re: funding / changing the criteria so that we can plan for immediate and long term recovery and renewal" A Supporting People team
  27. 27. 6. Benefits & opportunities for recovery and renewal • A theme throughout responses was that pre-COVID-19 business as usual strategies, service reviews and restructures may need to be reconsidered. • Conflicting views on new services/delivery models which people want to keep - large numbers of new approaches that people want to keep e.g. food, redeployment pool, beacon, frontline presence team. However, others were concerned that these services may increase dependency. • Extended hours - some services have seen benefits from operating extended hours e.g. expanded CAMHS crisis response, ASC & monitoring social media • There was a clear sense that the crisis had accelerated moves already well underway towards digital transformation across the organisation. Many felt that this is something we need to invest in and focus on as more work is needed. • There are opportunities from this to understand how we can transform our services – from leaving behind ways of working we no longer need, making the most of opportunities like digital transformation and supporting new services.
  28. 28. "Many services have implemented “digital signatures” by residents and officers, saving unnecessary journeys by residents and staff and speeding up processes." A Supporting People team "Contact Camden agreed with SignVideo to extend the Deaf Interpreting Contract from daytime only to 24/7 (at no cost)" A Corporate Services team "The work on food should result in the council committing to a mission around ending food poverty." A Supporting Communities team "Alongside our impacts analysis work, we will carry out a further review of our [ASC] transformation programme - to make decisions on priority projects... " A Supporting People team "Online platforms such as Time to Spare and Beacon will be helpful in both our role as a convener of services as well as with data collection" A Supporting Communities team "Different parts of the organisation [are] creating a dependency model (i.e. shielding & vulnerability) while others [are] creating a model to improve independency (i.e. what matters)" A Corporate Services team
  29. 29. • Suggestions services have made on what new opportunities from the pandemic they continue with: • Suggestions for further digital transformation include: • New delivery and transport services set up to support people during the crisis, including food deliveries. • The 7-day SPA for hospital discharge. • Quicker and easier access to safe accommodation for Camden Safety Net. • The Logistics Hub, Redeployment Hub and Frontline Presence Teams. • New delivery models within public health, Contact tracing and Public Health advice team. • The multi-disciplinary healthcare team (MDT). • The volunteer brokerage scheme established though Time to Spare. • Online platforms such as Time to Spare and Beacon will be helpful in both our role as a convener of services, as well as with data collection. • Strengthening the ability of the Council’s network/ICT support to function optimally with high volumes of home working. • Encouraging channel shifts for the many services that are still heavily reliant on paper-based inbound post. • Introducing a scanning solution for inbound post where this can’t be changed. • Ensuring that those council services that are still reliant on cheque payments move over to using Direct Debits Services. • Establish an internal standard and archive protocol to make it easier to learn from what we have been doing and to retrieve information in future. • Keeping Beacon and continuing to develop this. • Improving the libraries' digital options. • Use Facetime, WhatsApp and video calls within children’s safeguarding and social work where appropriate, for those young people who prefer it.
  30. 30. 7. Financial impact • COVID-19 has had a large impact on income generation • Changing attitudes towards regeneration • Impact of COVID-19 on businesses and commercial tenants • Reductions in HRA • Impact of maintaining temporary measures if they lead to permanent change or demand continues at current levels • Uncertainty around whether there is a continued need to achieve current MTFS savings targets • Perceived need to make savings/threat of cuts in all areas versus potential opportunities
  31. 31. "Can we afford to keep doing what we were doing? Some financial and strategic decisions have been taken driven by the need for an emergency response. We need to review and reconsider new approaches to ensure that we do not adopt or continue a way of working that is not evidence based." A Supporting People team "Businesses and individuals that have been negatively affected financially by Covid. They are liable for the debt and Camden needs the funds to support the Camden Plan. Recovery from estates where the person has died due to Covid. Deceased accounts are challenging at any time, but this will be particularly sensitive. Starting to bill again when people are just returning to work after the effect of Covid (such as Street Trading) when they are just re-building their income which may take time." A Corporate Services team "Will MTFS savings be required of the service still?" A Supporting People team "The next 18 months will see little commercial business which in turn will potentially cause a negative feeling within the team who rely on traded income and income maximisation for service delivery. Lack of income will cause a strain on the service and potentially a strain on individual team members who understand the importance of income and reaching targets. Long term this may be demoralising as indeed it can lead to job security and restructure." A Supporting Communities team "Opportunity to consider whether some of the innovations in service delivery during COVID that we carry into the future, enable more cost-effective service delivery models e.g. lower service overheads/estate costs, different skills mix etc" Public Health:
  32. 32. Annexes • Annex 1 – SLG recovery and renewal findings report • Annex 2 – Trends & Scenario Analysis • Annex 3 – full DMT feedback

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