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V academic grants-a quest

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V academic grants-a quest

  1. 1. ACADEMIC GRANTS A Quest for New Knowledge and Idea Grants or… The Unknown and Application Woes Professor Luiz Moutinho Professor of BioMarketing and Futures Research DCU Business School, Dublin City University, Ireland
  2. 2. Scientific and Academic Grants A Guide for the Curious 2 2
  3. 3. “The goal of a grant writing position is to support the research, instruction, and public service endeavors of the faculty.” Grant Seeking in Higher Education, Mary M. Licklider, et al., John Wiley & Sons, 2012. 3 3
  4. 4. The Quest for New Knowledge and…? 4 4 Faculty as Grant Writers Common Themes
  5. 5. 5 5 Academic Grantsmanship Grantsmanship is the ability to write grant proposals that get funded. Faculty as Grant Writers Grantsmanship matters because it is tied to long-term employment for many, personal reputation, and status of the university.  Funded grant proposals support projects that generate results or products. Products include:  Books, Research Articles, Scholarly Works, and More Grants...
  6. 6. 6 6 Faculty as Grant Writers “There is no amount of grantsmanship that will turn a bad idea into a good one, but there are many ways to disguise a good one.” William Raub former Deputy Director, NIH
  7. 7. 7 7 Focus and Variety Extramural grant funds support education, research, outreach, and economic development. Grant funds support an almost endless list of academic and public service activities including  scholarships,  research,  travel,  fellowships,  teaching,  learning,  exhibits,  performances,  equipment,  and more... Faculty as Grant Writers
  8. 8. 8 8  Common Themes A Few Lessons  A faculty member, a research scientist, a laboratory group, or a larger collaborative effort are really nonprofit centers that function within the huge nonprofit that is the university.  Research grants are hybrids of project grants and operating support grants.  They are hybrids because principle investigators can receive partial salary from grant awards.  All research grants are evidence-based.  Evidence arises from: • previous studies • prior experimental results Research grants almost always include tables, graphs, or pictures in the narrative to demonstrate prior results and the credibility of the proposer.
  9. 9. 9 9  Common Themes Individual Faculty Are Nonprofit Centers University Administration College or School A Department A1 Department A2 College or School B Department B1 Grants arise from any level in the university. Faculty initiate grants as individuals or groups.
  10. 10. 10 10  Common Themes Collaboration Happens Scientific and other academic research is collaborative by nature. Interdisciplinary research in the academy is a rising trend.  Faculty regularly collaborate with each other within and across departments, schools, and colleges in their higher education setting. More importantly faculty collaborate with colleagues at other national and international institutions of higher education. These relationships take the following forms:  Co-principal Investigator  Subcontract to a Lead Institution  Consortia, Large and Small
  11. 11. 11 11  Common Themes Funds may be out there … we just need to hunt for them...
  12. 12. 12 12  Common Themes  It’s never too early or too late to start searching, but you will need to cut through the clutter and be a “smart searcher”  To be successful, you will need to: Finding funders Search in the right places Know relevant agencies Learn grant cycles
  13. 13. 13 13  Common Themes The Questions Remain the Same Defining the Problem  What do you want or need to do?  Why do you want or need to do it? Organizing for Action  Who will do the work?  How will the work get done?  What will be the likely results? Estimating the Cost  What is it going to cost?  Why does it cost that? Honest Evaluation Were the desired results attained? Why or why not were the desired results achieved?
  14. 14. 14 14  Common Themes Your opportunity should match with these four areas: Money research funding is available Eligibility you’re ready and meet requirements Fit your research interests connect with funder Time a competitive proposal can be written in the time available
  15. 15. 15 15  Common Themes Fit …does your project match the funder’s goals and priorities? Many sponsors have websites with helpful information:  What are the sponsor’s goals and priorities? What have they funded in the past?  What is their program focus? population? method? issue?  Who can I contact for information for assistance, guidance, or advice?  What are the review criteria?  Do they have sample proposals?
  16. 16. 16 16  Common Themes Time ... can a competitive proposal be written in the time available? ● Start early. ● Assess your timeline. o When will you complete doctoral program requirements? collect data? conduct analysis? write up? o Can you continue operations until funding would be received? ● Do you have time to complete the application? ● How long does it take for a decision? When will the funds become available? ● Can you reapply?
  17. 17. Language and Terminology 17 17 Conceptual and Critical Differences
  18. 18. 18 18  Conceptual and Critical Differences Different Words – Same Meaning While Academics Use These Words Nonprofits Translate Them To Mean These Hypothesis or Question Needs Statement Sponsor or Agency Funders Principal Investigator Project Director Extramural Funding Grant Support Development or Advancement Gifts or Donations Sponsored Research Office Accounting Direct Costs Project Costs Indirect Costs or Facilities and Admin. Overhead Curriculum Vitae or Biographical Sketch Resume
  19. 19. 19 19  Conceptual and Critical Differences / Faculty as Grant Writers Academic Writing vs. Storytelling Academics are professional writers, but not always the best communicators in grant proposals. Grant Proposals Tell Stories.  Stories showing how research overcomes some challenge.  Stories that show creative solutions to research questions.  Stories connecting the research to a bigger picture. Great research proposals have elements of all three types of stories.
  20. 20. 20 20  Conceptual and Critical Differences / Faculty as Grant Writers Typical grant components  Title  Project summary / Abstract  Narrative • Bibliography  Support materials • Biographical narrative • Letters of recommendation  Budget
  21. 21. 21 21  Conceptual and Critical Differences Basic Proposal Format Sections & Pages Executive Summary Needs Statement Project Description Budget Organizational Information Conclusion Total length: less than 6 pages, not including supplemental documents or information required by the funder.
  22. 22. 22 22  Conceptual and Critical Differences National Science Foundation Proposal Sections & Page Limits Cover Sheet Project Summary Table of Contents Project Description References Cited Biographical Sketch(es) Budget & Justification Current & Pending Support Facillities & Other Resources Special Info. Or Supplementary Doc. NSF limits the narrative to 15 pages and must address the “broader impacts” of the work.
  23. 23. 23 23  Conceptual and Critical Differences / Faculty as Grant Writers What makes a grant proposal successful?  start early  contact with funding sponsor  research matches funding announcement  aligned with priorities of sponsor  written with the review process in mind  captures reviewers’ attention  well-organized, engaging language  clear focus  follows the instructions precisely  applicant seeks outside review before submitting  compelling idea that advances the science  not too ambitious or unrealistic  no typos, grammatical errors  reasonable and accurate budget  submitted on time
  24. 24. 24 24  Conceptual and Critical Differences / Faculty as Grant Writers Reviewers  Keep in mind that the reviewers may not be in your same discipline / functional area.  Write clearly in a way that is accessible to non-academics.  Grab their attention right away – title, intro sentence, etc..  Websites may provide information on past/current reviewers. Use this knowledge to inform your writing.
  25. 25. 25 25  Conceptual and Critical Differences / Faculty as Grant Writers Reviewers  Talk to colleagues about any past experiences as reviewers.  What did they look for?  What impressed them?  What were basic mistakes they saw?  How did they evaluate proposals with others from different specializations?  If possible, take advantage of opportunities to serve as a reviewer for grants, awards, etc. within your field.
  26. 26. 26 26  Conceptual and Critical Differences / Faculty as Grant Writers Grants in the Academy: Administration  Faculty are grant writers.  Faculty have some grant management responsibilities  Limited roles include: o Personnel o Supplies & Equipment o Reporting  The Office of Research and Sponsored Programs is responsible for grant administration.  Staff assist with proposal initiation, signature routing, submission, pre-award matters, compliance, reporting, budgets, purchasing, award closeout, and other issues according to policies.
  27. 27. 27 27
  28. 28. A Few Conclusions and the Future 28 28 Scary and Unknown
  29. 29. 29 29  Scary and Unknown Science, the Sequester, and Budget Woes What does this mean for scientific research? The short answer is: fewer grants to fewer investigators.  New investigators likely will be affected the most.  Novel ideas from either new or established scientists will be set aside in favor of less risky research.  Projects will go unfunded.  Personnel will be let go.  Labs will be downsized.
  30. 30.  What do you want to fund?  Where can you find funding?  Who can be part of your support network?  What related skills do you already possess?  What is your next step? 30 30  Scary and Unknown Moving Forward...
  31. 31. 31 31  Scary and Unknown
  32. 32. And... 32 32 WITH THANKS TO  Dr. Deborah Cook, The Grant Science Lab and  The Institute for Research on Teaching and Learning

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