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David Dixon FAIA
Senior Principal, Stantec
Leader, Stantec’s Urban Places Group
November 4, 2014
CEOs for Cities National ...
In the wake of 9/11
“Density kills….[It] is a
problem that will grow
only more explosive—
or infectious…”December 2001
“Bl...
Density saves lives
Inactivity and poor diet,
largely associated with
auto-dependent, low-
density environments,
caused “3...
Density saves lives
How density saves lives
150-200Chronic health
conditions per
100 people
Miles per year
20,000-25,000
EXURBAN
How density saves lives
150-200Chronic health
conditions per
100 people
Miles per year
20,000-25,000
120-140
15,000-20,000...
How density saves lives
150-200Chronic health
conditions per
100 people
Miles per year
20,000-25,000
120-140
15,000-20,000...
Not all densities are
created equal
Not all densities are
created equal
Walkable density:
5-minute rule
A mix of housing,
shopping, recreation
and other choices
within a 5-minute
walk builds qua...
Walkable density:
5-minute rule
A mix of housing,
shopping, recreation
and other choices
within a 5-minute
walk builds qua...
Walkable density:
5-minute rule
A mix of housing,
shopping, recreation
and other choices
within a 5-minute
walk builds qua...
Walkable density:
every street has a job
• main streets
(focus amenity,
walkability)
• primary streets
(walkability,
conne...
Walkable density:
critical mass
Replace with Wei sketch
1,000 to 2,000
housing units within a
5-10 minute walk can
bring a...
Walkable density:
public benefits
Use density bonuses
to fund “public
goods”—lively
squares, transit, arts,
job training a...
Walkable density:
public-realm hierarchy
A multilayered
hiearchy of spaces,
from the most
interactive to the
most personal...
The Jane Jacobs
paradox
Amenity-rich,
walkable urban
places create
value...but reduce
the economic
diversity Jane Jacobs
e...
The Jane Jacobs
paradox
Kendall Square’s
Amenity-rich,
walkable urban
places create
value...but reduce
the economic
divers...
The Jane Jacobs
paradox
Equity is now a
central issue in
planning for growth.
The 2010 census
showed that, for the
first t...
Density saves lives
David Dixon and
Larissa Brown (leader
of comprehensive
planning for the Urban
Places Group) receive
th...
Cities and regions
Stantec’s Urban
Places Group, with
Goody Clancy, is
preparing a smart-
growth
comprehensive plan
for Co...
Downtown revival
Downtown Albany Strategic Plan
David Dixon and
Larissa Brown
receiving the
American Planning
Association’...
Dublin, OH: Bridge Street Corridor plan
Stantec’s Urban Places
Group planned West 5
in London, Ontario, the
region’s first...
Stantec’s Urban Places
Group created the
plan for Calgary’s new
West Village, a mixed-
use riverfront district
that extend...
Stantec’s Urban Places GroupNeighborhood
revitalization
Replace with
charlotte
CNIP image
from Matt
Stantec’s Urban Places...
Stantec’s Urban Places GroupUrban infrastructure
Stantec’s Urban
Places Group is
planning for significant
infrastructure
i...
Urban mixed-use
development
Stantec’s Urban Places
Group’s plan for
One Channel Center
in Boston’s Seaport
District mixes ...
Stantec’s Urban Places Group
By helping people manage the
rising demand for urban life,
we help shape more livable,
equita...
To Make Your Community Healthier, Make it Denser, by David Dixon, Stantec
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To Make Your Community Healthier, Make it Denser, by David Dixon, Stantec

Panel discussion explores how cities can be designed and built to promote a culture of health and increase opportunities for active, social and healthy living. For more info, visit ceosforcitiesnationalmeeting.org.

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To Make Your Community Healthier, Make it Denser, by David Dixon, Stantec

  1. David Dixon FAIA Senior Principal, Stantec Leader, Stantec’s Urban Places Group November 4, 2014 CEOs for Cities National Meeting To Make Your Community Healthier…Try Density
  2. In the wake of 9/11 “Density kills….[It] is a problem that will grow only more explosive— or infectious…”December 2001 “Blueprint for a Better City”
  3. Density saves lives Inactivity and poor diet, largely associated with auto-dependent, low- density environments, caused “300,000 deaths in the United States… second only to tobacco.” 1996 report issued by the Centers for Disease Control
  4. Density saves lives
  5. How density saves lives 150-200Chronic health conditions per 100 people Miles per year 20,000-25,000 EXURBAN
  6. How density saves lives 150-200Chronic health conditions per 100 people Miles per year 20,000-25,000 120-140 15,000-20,000 SUBURBAN EXURBAN
  7. How density saves lives 150-200Chronic health conditions per 100 people Miles per year 20,000-25,000 120-140 15,000-20,000 100-120 5,000-10,000 URBAN SUBURBAN EXURBAN
  8. Not all densities are created equal
  9. Not all densities are created equal
  10. Walkable density: 5-minute rule A mix of housing, shopping, recreation and other choices within a 5-minute walk builds quality of life and makes active transportation a viable choice for most people. David Dixon led planning for suburban Dublin, Ohio’s new downtown when he was principal-in-charge of planning at Goody Clancy
  11. Walkable density: 5-minute rule A mix of housing, shopping, recreation and other choices within a 5-minute walk builds quality of life and makes active transportation a viable choice for most people. The Dublin plan is transforming 1,000 acres of shopping centers and similar uses into a “higher density, mixed-use downtown” organized into 5-minute walking districts.
  12. Walkable density: 5-minute rule A mix of housing, shopping, recreation and other choices within a 5-minute walk builds quality of life and makes active transportation a viable choice for most people. More than four million SF of mixed-use development is currently in the pipeline for Dublin.
  13. Walkable density: every street has a job • main streets (focus amenity, walkability) • primary streets (walkability, connections) • secondary streets (parking, service) Stantec’s Urban Places Group led planning for Charlotte’s Hall House site to spur downtown growth (Charlotte Housing Authority, with Perkins and Will)
  14. Walkable density: critical mass Replace with Wei sketch 1,000 to 2,000 housing units within a 5-10 minute walk can bring a block of Main Street to life. Thresholds like these are critical to meeting meaningful density goals. More than 700 units on the Hall House site will hit a tipping point for reviving lifeless streets.
  15. Walkable density: public benefits Use density bonuses to fund “public goods”—lively squares, transit, arts, job training and affordable housing. Planning for redevelopment of the Hall House site focused on meeting thresholds to support shops and cafés along now- lifeless streets, affordable housing, an animated public realm, and parking for nearby sites. The plan creates a new public square on the site.
  16. Walkable density: public-realm hierarchy A multilayered hiearchy of spaces, from the most interactive to the most personal, builds community. David Dixon led planning and rezoning to guide the next chapter of growth in the Boston region’s leading innovation district, Kendall Square, while principal-in-charge of planning at Goody Clancy.
  17. The Jane Jacobs paradox Amenity-rich, walkable urban places create value...but reduce the economic diversity Jane Jacobs envisioned.
  18. The Jane Jacobs paradox Kendall Square’s Amenity-rich, walkable urban places create value...but reduce the economic diversity Jane Jacobs envisioned.
  19. The Jane Jacobs paradox Equity is now a central issue in planning for growth. The 2010 census showed that, for the first time, more US poor live in suburbs than cities—rising more than 50% from 2000 in more than half of large US metros. SOURCE:THENEWYORKTIMES
  20. Density saves lives David Dixon and Larissa Brown (leader of comprehensive planning for the Urban Places Group) receive the American Planning Association “Hard-Won Victory” Award for the New Orleans post-Katrina master plan, which they led while at Goody Clancy. Stantec’s Urban Places Group: current and recent work
  21. Cities and regions Stantec’s Urban Places Group, with Goody Clancy, is preparing a smart- growth comprehensive plan for Corpus Christi, Texas
  22. Downtown revival Downtown Albany Strategic Plan David Dixon and Larissa Brown receiving the American Planning Association’s Hard Won Victory Award for the New Orleans Master Plan, which they led while at Goody Clancy David Dixon led planning for Project Downtown in Wichita while principal-in- charge of planning at Goody Clancy.
  23. Dublin, OH: Bridge Street Corridor plan Stantec’s Urban Places Group planned West 5 in London, Ontario, the region’s first new suburban downtown. New suburban centers and downtowns
  24. Stantec’s Urban Places Group created the plan for Calgary’s new West Village, a mixed- use riverfront district that extends the city’s transit-oriented-centers policy. The district will grow to more than 8 millionSF and 5,000 residents. Transit-oriented districts
  25. Stantec’s Urban Places GroupNeighborhood revitalization Replace with charlotte CNIP image from Matt Stantec’s Urban Places Group is developing a revitalization plan for the 27 neighborhoods of the West Trade/ Rozzelles Ferry area in Charlotte.
  26. Stantec’s Urban Places GroupUrban infrastructure Stantec’s Urban Places Group is planning for significant infrastructure improvements and a new transit-oriented district in Stamford, Connecticut.
  27. Urban mixed-use development Stantec’s Urban Places Group’s plan for One Channel Center in Boston’s Seaport District mixes housing, retail, office, and a public square. Stantec Commercial Architecture Group— formerly ADD, Inc.—is the project architect.
  28. Stantec’s Urban Places Group By helping people manage the rising demand for urban life, we help shape more livable, equitable, and resilient communities.

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