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Web browsers

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Web browsers

  1. 1. *Kinds of Web browsers and its important features
  2. 2. Web Browsers  A software application for retrieving, presenting and traversing information resources on the World Wide Web.  An information resource is identified by a Uniform Resource Identifier/Locator (URI/URL) and may be a web page, image, video or other piece of content.  Hyperlinks present in resources enable users easily to navigate their browsers to related resources.
  3. 3.  Although browsers are primarily intended to use the World Wide Web, they can also be used to access information provided by web servers in private networks or files in file systems. Web Browsers
  4. 4. Web Browsers The major web browsers are : Firefox Internet Explorer Google Chrome
  5. 5. Purpose of Web Browsers The primary purpose of a web browser is:  Bring information resources to the user ( "retrieval" or "fetching“ )  Allowing them to view the information ( "display", "rendering“ )  Access other information ( "navigation", "following links“ ).
  6. 6. Using a Web Browser  This process begins when the user inputs a Uniform Resource Locator (URL), for example http://en.wikipedia.org/ , into the browser.  The prefix of the URL, the Uniform Resource Identifier or URI, determines how the URL will be interpreted.
  7. 7. Using a Web Browser  The most commonly used kind of URI starts with http: and identifies a resource to be retrieved over the Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP).  Many browsers also support a variety of other prefixes, such as https: for HTTPS, ftp: for the File Transfer Protocol, and file: for local files.
  8. 8. Web Browsers User Interface Elements  Back and forward buttons to go back to the previous resource and forward respectively.  A refresh or reload button to reload the current resource.  A stop button to cancel loading the resource. In some browsers, the stop button is merged with the reload button.
  9. 9. Web Browsers User Interface Elements  A home button to return to the user's home page.  An address bar to input the Uniform Resource Identifier (URI) of the desired resource and display it.  A search bar to input terms into a search engine. In some browsers, the search bar is merged with the address bar.
  10. 10. Web Browsers User Interface Elements  A status bar to display progress in loading the resource and also the URI of links when the cursor hovers over them, and page zooming capability.  The viewport, the visible area of the webpage within the browser window.  The ability to view the HTML source for a page.
  11. 11. Most browsers support HTTP Secure and offer quick and easy ways to delete the web cache, cookies, and browsing history.
  12. 12.  Early web browsers supported only a very simple version of HTML.  The rapid development of proprietary web browsers led to the development of non-standard dialects of HTML, leading to problems with interoperability.  Modern web browsers support a combination of standards-based and de facto HTML and XHTML, which should be rendered in the same way by all browsers.
  13. 13. Web Browsers The major web browsers are : Firefox Internet Explorer Google Chrome
  14. 14. Internet Explorer  Internet Explorer (formerly Microsoft Internet Explorer and Windows Internet Explorer, commonly abbreviated IE or MSIE).  A series of graphical web browsers developed by Microsoft and included as part of the Microsoft Windows line of operating systems, starting in 1995.
  15. 15. Internet Explorer  It was first released as part of the add-on package Plus! for Windows 95 that year.  Later versions were available as free downloads, or in service packs, and included in the Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) service releases of Windows 95 and later versions of Windows.
  16. 16. Internet Explorer  Internet Explorer is one of the most widely used web browsers, attaining a peak of about 95% usage share during 2002 and 2003.  It’s usage share has since declined with the launch of Firefox (2004) and Google Chrome (2008), and with the growing popularity of operating systems such as OS X, Linux and Android that do not run Internet Explorer.
  17. 17. Internet Explorer  Estimates for Internet Explorer's overall market share range from 27.4% to 54.13%, as of October 2012.  Microsoft spent over US$100 million per year on Internet Explorer in the late 1990s, with over 1000 people working on it by 1999.
  18. 18. Internet Explorer  From January 12, 2016, only the most recent version of Internet Explorer on each operating system will be supported, depending on operating system it will be IE 11 or could be down to IE 9 for older Windows versions.
  19. 19. Internet Explorer  On April 26, 2014, Microsoft issued a security advisory relating to a vulnerability that could allow "remote code execution" in Internet Explorer versions 6 to 11.  The vulnerability was resolved with a security update on May 1, 2014.
  20. 20. Mozilla Firefox  A free and open-source web browser developed for Windows, OS X, and Linux, with a mobile version for Android, by the Mozilla Foundation and its subsidiary, the Mozilla Corporation.
  21. 21. Mozilla Firefox  As of February 2014, Firefox has between 12% and 22% of worldwide usage, making it, per different sources, the third most popular web browser.  According to Mozilla, Firefox counts over 450 million users around the world.
  22. 22. Mozilla Firefox  The browser has had particular success in Indonesia, Iran, Germany, and Poland, where it is the most popular browser with 55%, 46%, 43%, and 41% of the market share, respectively.
  23. 23. Mozilla Firefox Features include:  tabbed browsing  spell checking  incremental find  live bookmarking  smart Bookmarks  download manager  private browsing  location-aware browsing
  24. 24. Mozilla Firefox  Because Firefox generally has fewer publicly known unpatched security vulnerabilities than Internet Explorer improved security is often cited as a reason to switch from Internet Explorer to Firefox.
  25. 25. Firefox or IE ?!?  The Washington Post reported that exploit code for known critical unpatched security vulnerabilities in Internet Explorer was available for 284 days in 2006.  In comparison, exploit code for known, critical security vulnerabilities in Firefox was available for nine days before Mozilla issued a patch to remedy the problem.
  26. 26. Google Chrome  Google Chrome is a freeware web browser developed by Google.  It was first released as a beta version for Microsoft Windows on September 2, 2008, and as a stable public release on December 11, 2008.
  27. 27. Google Chrome  As of July 2014, StatCounter estimates that Google Chrome has a 45% worldwide usage share of web browsers, indicating that it is the most widely used web browser in the world.  Google releases the majority of Chrome's source code as an open-source project Chromium.  A notable component that is not open source is the built-in Adobe Flash Player.
  28. 28. Google Chrome  Google Chrome aims to be secure, fast, simple and stable.  There are extensive differences from its peers in Chrome's minimalistic user interface, which is a typical of modern web browsers.
  29. 29. Google Chrome Environment
  30. 30. Google Chrome  One of Chrome's strengths is its: Application performance and JavaScript processing speed, both of which were independently verified by multiple websites to be the swiftest among the major browsers of its time.
  31. 31. Features Google Chrome  One prominent features of it is a graphical user interface (GUI) innovation, the merging of the address bar and search bar (the Omnibox).
  32. 32. Features Google Chrome  Chrome allows users to synchronize their bookmarks, history, and settings across all devices with the browser installed by sending and receiving data through a chosen Google Account, which in turn updates all signed-in instances of Chrome.  This can be authenticated either through Google credentials, or a sync passphrase.
  33. 33. Google Chrome Security  Chrome periodically retrieves updates of two blacklists, and warns users when they attempt to visit a site Chrome sees as potentially harmful.  This service is also made available for use by others via a free public API called "Google Safe Browsing API".
  34. 34. Google Chrome Malware blocking  Google introduced download scanning protection in Chrome 17.  Chrome tries to prevent malware with Sandboxing.  The Sandbox monitors each and every webpage tab separately.
  35. 35. Google Chrome Malware blocking  When the user opens a malicious website, Chrome contains the malware in an area called a sandbox.  The other tabs that the user has open are unaffected.
  36. 36. Google Chrome Malware blocking  When the user closes the bad page, the malware goes with it leaving other tabs and the computer unaffected.  Chrome also automatically updates to the latest security features to maximize user protection from malware.
  37. 37. Google Chrome Privacy  The private browsing feature called Incognito mode - prevents the browser from permanently storing any history information or cookies from the websites visited.  Incognito mode is similar to the private browsing feature in other web browsers.

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