Diese Präsentation wurde erfolgreich gemeldet.
Wir verwenden Ihre LinkedIn Profilangaben und Informationen zu Ihren Aktivitäten, um Anzeigen zu personalisieren und Ihnen relevantere Inhalte anzuzeigen. Sie können Ihre Anzeigeneinstellungen jederzeit ändern.

Jason Fraser - A Leaders' Guide to Implementing Lean Startup in Organisations

270 Aufrufe

Veröffentlicht am

The Leader's Guide Workshop walks through the 8 Sections of Eric Reis's Leader's Guide, breaking out each section into actions that you can take as a leader to bring Lean Startup to your organization. We'll cover some of the basics of Lean Startup and how to reframe them for easier consumption in your organisation, then delve into the difficult areas of people, money, and scale.

Veröffentlicht in: Business
  • Secrets to making $$$ with paid surveys... ◆◆◆ https://tinyurl.com/make2793amonth
       Antworten 
    Sind Sie sicher, dass Sie …  Ja  Nein
    Ihre Nachricht erscheint hier
  • You can now be your own boss and get yourself a very generous daily income. START FREE...▲▲▲ https://tinyurl.com/realmoneystreams2019
       Antworten 
    Sind Sie sicher, dass Sie …  Ja  Nein
    Ihre Nachricht erscheint hier
  • Just got my check for $500, Sometimes people don't believe me when I tell them about how much you can make taking paid surveys online... So I took a video of myself actually getting paid $500 for paid surveys to finally set the record straight. I'm not going to leave this video up for long, so check it out now before I take it down! ♥♥♥ https://tinyurl.com/realmoneystreams2019
       Antworten 
    Sind Sie sicher, dass Sie …  Ja  Nein
    Ihre Nachricht erscheint hier
  • Are you an etrepreneur??? Looking for opportunities to start your business bearing minimal costs?? Well, you’re in luck, EveryCatalog is here to solve all your problems. https://goo.gl/EvsBx7
       Antworten 
    Sind Sie sicher, dass Sie …  Ja  Nein
    Ihre Nachricht erscheint hier

Jason Fraser - A Leaders' Guide to Implementing Lean Startup in Organisations

  1. 1. 1 The Lean Startup Summit Europe - 2018
  2. 2. Workshop Agenda OPENER REFRESH PROOF SIMPLIFY LEARN TRUST PEOPLE MONEY SCALE The Change Imperative Opening minds to Lean Startup Recognizing the components of evidence Combatting scope in your MVPs The surprising mechanics of learning The most powerful transformation tool Creating effective teams Accountability for entrepreneurs GE’s Lean Startup Transformation Playbook
  3. 3. Keep in touch! @jfraser
  4. 4. Why does this matter to me?
  5. 5. “To meet the demands of the fast-changing competitive scene, we must simply learn to love change as much as we have hated it in the past.” –Tom Peters, 1987
  6. 6. $4.3B Valuation Financial Services $62.5B Valuation Transportation $55B Valuation Entertainment $25.5B Valuation Travel & Hospitality $3.2B Acquisition by Google Home Automation Software is disrupting entire industries
  7. 7. S&P Churn since 2002 ADDED TO the index LEFT the index
  8. 8. The greatest risk for any business today is the pace of change.
  9. 9. For 100 years, management has emphasized planning and control as a means of ensuring predictable outcomes.
  10. 10. When change is your greatest threat, plans and predictions are (literally) unbelievable.
  11. 11. Tom Peters saw the problem coming in 1987, but nobody really figured out what to do about it, until now.
  12. 12. Lean Startup is a management approach that mitigates the risk of change, turning it into an asset that can be leveraged, by supporting entrepreneurship throughout any company.
  13. 13. Lean Startup is not religion. These are not rigid rules set in stone. We don’t care if you use the jargon. It’s the thought behind your action that counts.
  14. 14. How do you retool for entrepreneurship when your planning and accountability processes look like this? Analyze Plan Stakeholders Feedback Revise Budget (staged-gate system) Approve Execute Measure
  15. 15. Pair Up
  16. 16. Switch!
  17. 17. Refresh See Lean Startup as a series of predictions
  18. 18. We practice Lean Startup so that we don't waste time on things that ultimately won’t deliver value. We avoid waste by learning early where our strategies are wrong. This takes courage.
  19. 19. Fear & Shame
  20. 20. COACHING ACTIVITY Keep a “Predictions Log” 1. Before you interact with a customer or colleague, jot down in a little book, in one sentence, what you think will happen at that meeting. 2. After the meeting, look at your prediction and write down what actually happened. 3. Make a habit of doing this. Changing Mindsets This small habit forms a solid base for an experimental mindset. Predictions Expectations, assumptions and hypotheses are more- or less- formal predictions about the future. Becoming mindful about predictions, in small ways, helps people see how often we’re wrong, and how inconsequential it can be to be wrong.
  21. 21. Make a Prediction Q: What do you already believe about this first working session of the day?
  22. 22. ACTIVITY In 4 minutes, list as many assumptions as you can: ➔ Anything you already believe about the project. ➔ Your predictions for the future. ➔ Every expected product feature. (See page 4 in your handout for specific ideas.)
  23. 23. ACTIVITY Now, read through the list slowly. Take a moment with each assumption to consider that maybe you’re wrong. When you find that thought making you really uncomfortable, circle it.
  24. 24. Some assumptions are unexceptional— well- established facts or straightforward deductions. Hidden among these mundane details are a handful of assumptions that require courage to state. That’s what we’re looking for.
  25. 25. ACTIVITY Choose 1 assumption and rewrite it as a prediction: “If I do X, then Y will happen.”
  26. 26. ACTIVITY 6 minutes to share them with your partner. ● Why does it make you uncomfortable? ● What would be the impact if you’re wrong?
  27. 27. Prediction Go back to your Predictions Log and write down what actually happened during this session. Was your prediction correct? Then take a moment to write one or two sentences that predict what will happen in the next section, which is about PROOF.
  28. 28. Proof Consider what needs to be proven, to whom, and how we can know that something is true.
  29. 29. Consider a few of the things we referred to as assumptions in the last activity: ● Requirements ● Forecasts ● Customer requests ● Plans for scaling ● Distribution strategies
  30. 30. “The laws of physics are required. Everything else is optional.” –Eric Ries
  31. 31. ACTIVITY Write down all the “requirements” & “customer requests” you can remember.
  32. 32. But wait… How can you call a direct request from a customer “an assumption”?
  33. 33. [Tell the Faster Horse story.]
  34. 34. Eric’s strategy for dealing with customer requests: 1. Listen for repeated requests. 2. Talk to (listen to) as many layers of the customer organization before responding to a request. 3. Determine how real the request is before creating an MVP. 4. Observe customer behavior in response to your MVP.
  35. 35. Until you really understand your customers*, you won’t know what’s actually important to them. (So you’re going to have to spend a lot of time talking to them.)
  36. 36. *Customer Any person who you hope will find enough value in your product or service to make some kind of investment in it, or partnership with you.
  37. 37. Write down 5-10 “customers” who need to “invest” in your product. ACTIVITY Choose one to focus on for the remainder of the day.
  38. 38. *What constitutes PROOF? Measured customer actions. Not opinions. Not preferences.
  39. 39. ● resources ● reputation ● social capital ● time ● money ● space Proof = Measured Customer Action To gather proof, think of some way to invite the customer to exchange something of value with you:
  40. 40. [tell the hospital story]
  41. 41. ACTIVITY Drawing from any of the assumptions you’ve listed so far today, make a prediction that will allow you to gather proof from that customer. This time, use the format: If I [do x] , my customer will [do y] .
  42. 42. ACTIVITY 3 minutes to share with your partner. Then switch.
  43. 43. DEFINITIONS What do we mean by “customer”? Any person who you hope will find enough value in your product/service/project to make some kind of investment or partnership. What needs to be proven? Assumptions, “requirements”, specifications, plans, backlogs, distribution models, pricing schemes—anything required for success. What constitutes proof? Customer actions that represent an exchange of value. Proof Entrepreneurial management relies on evidence to guide decision- making. We gather that evidence by asking customers to exchange something of value. Seeking proof for our predictions helps us know where our strategies are correct and where they need to change.
  44. 44. Prediction Go back to your Predictions Log and write down what actually happened during this session. Was your prediction correct? Then take a moment to write one or two sentences that predict what will happen in the next section, which is about SIMPLICITY.
  45. 45. Simplify Consider the human side of reducing scope and learning early.
  46. 46. ● De-featured version of a product ● New customer service agreement ● Sales process ● Standing outside the whole foods ● Physical configurations using simpler materials ● Pitch meeting (“talk track”) ● Virtual models ● Concept drawings ● Prototype ● Brochure ● Value proposition ● Website ● Physical product What qualifies as an MVP?
  47. 47. DEFINITIONS Quality High quality can only be known by observing customer behavior in response to our MVPs. We will know what customers value through their actions. Focus It’s easy to confuse focus with sacrifice, but it’s not. It’s the freedom to do one thing at a time. YAGNI [google search term] “You ain’t gonna need it.” Simplify We simplify, make MVPs, to make sure we don’t waste our time and skills over-delivering features that are not actually important to the customer. Simplifying enables us to leave dead-end efforts behind, so that we can invest our skills, values, and instincts into work that truly matters.
  48. 48. “This approach is about asking our innovators to make sure they don’t waste their time and skills over- delivering features that are not actually important to the customer.” Work Efficiently
  49. 49. ACTIVITY Pull out your prediction: If I [do x] , my customer will [do y] . Write down all the things doing that will entail—every step, feature, activity, supply, approval—needed to do this. Think about how long it will take. How expensive? How many person hours?
  50. 50. ACTIVITY Now think about what you need to learn and consider, How you could get a result in 2 weeks (or 2 days)?
  51. 51. ACTIVITY Talk with your partner — 4m, then switch What’s the worst that could happen if you did the experiment in this crappy, embarrassingly low-rent way? What might you learn if you did it?
  52. 52. Prediction Go back to your Predictions Log and write down what actually happened during this session. Was your prediction correct? Then take a moment to write one or two sentences that predict what will happen in the next section, which is about LEARNING.
  53. 53. Learn 30 minutes to consider the role of vision in learning.
  54. 54. COMPONENTS Vision The “true north” goal that represents success. Clarifies pivot or persevere decisions. Productive Failure Deliberately exposing a weakness in strategy (usually caused by faulty assumptions) in order to reduce waste. Learning Metrics Are actionable, accessible, and auditable. Learn All innovators begin with some good ideas as well as some toxic ones. But ultimately of these ideas exist in service to some vision. With clarity about our vision and an experimentation mindset, we can deliberately probe our plans to expose toxic ideas early and stay on course.
  55. 55. Vision Pyramid
  56. 56. ACTIVITY Share your Vision Pyramid with your partner. 3m, then switch Discuss what it would mean if you learned that your prediction is false. What would you do?
  57. 57. Pivot or Persevere Meeting Possible outcomes Double-down, persevere, pivot, stop Cadence 2x a month is common. At least once every two months. Who attends The core team + business leadership What to bring A complete report of product optimizations over time A comparison of how these results stack up against expectations Detailed accounts of conversations with customers Learning metrics to make mathematically informed decisions And, of course, your Vision Pyramid. Look for Did our customer validation continually fail? Are we having problems hitting actionable targets? Are our targets failing to improve over time? Is this getting us closer to our vision?
  58. 58. When you expose a flawed assumption or a faulty aspect of your strategy, it must not be considered failure. Even if the project is discontinued, you will, in fact, have saved your company the huge sum of money that had been set aside to fund the project. Productive Failure
  59. 59. Prediction Go back to your Predictions Log and write down what actually happened during this session. Was your prediction correct? Then take a moment to write one or two sentences that predict what will happen in the next section, which is about TRUST.
  60. 60. Trust 30 minutes to consider that trust is the magic pixie dust that brings innovation to life.
  61. 61. Management + Entrepreneurs + Trust = Innovation MAGIC PIXIE DUST
  62. 62. “Entrepreneur, you spent $10k wisely, so I gave you $50k. You spent that wisely, so I gave you $100k. Your mistakes were productive, and you didn’t hide them. You demonstrated progress and learning all the way. ” “Leader, you reward me for telling the truth, even when it’s bad news. You aren’t breathing down my neck. You gave me support, so I asked for support again. I know that you are going to support me.” Here’s what TRUST looks like
  63. 63. From the start, manager and entrepreneur need to candidly discuss: “If we do this, what can go wrong?” “And if that goes wrong, what’s the worst that can happen?” Build trust by addressing fear
  64. 64. ACTIVITY Write down 5 things that could go wrong if you did the (shoddy, embarrassingly low-rent) experiment you designed earlier? If those thing do go wrong, what’s the worst that could happen? Write down some of the worst possible outcomes.
  65. 65. ACTIVITY Now admit all of that to your partner. Every single negative consequence that could happen. ● Which would endanger a person or cause irreparable harm to your company? (E.g., safety, security, compliance) Circle these and talk about how you could prevent those effects. ● Which would be merely embarassing? Cross these out.
  66. 66. Benefits of talking frankly about fears FEAR Possible Consequences You can devise boundaries and constrain experiments, so that the worst case scenario isn’t very bad. Working together to reduce risk builds trust. >
  67. 67. Islands of Freedom An operational model for entrepreneurship within organizations Entrepreneurs agree to be held accountable for results in exchange for independent authority to do what is best for the customer. The team operates semi-autonomously. CORE TEAM –4-5 people –fully dedicated –cross-functional –incl. gatekeeper functions COMMITTED volunteers Well-chosen, intelligent PARAMETERS that facilitate innovation, rather than stifle it. Islands of Freedom have: AUTHORITY Over small but secure funding ACCOUNTABILITY For pre-negotiated, measurable outcomes RESPONSIBILITY For exploring the advisability of an entrepreneurial venture
  68. 68. Entrepreneurship Process Model GROWTH BOARD Initial Pitch, provisional yes! BUILD the foundation for trust ● Discuss “what could go wrong” ● Agree on parameters ● Agree on metrics ● Agree on cadence ● Create an island of freedom ● Assemble a dedicated, cross- functional team Experiments GROWTH BOARD Periodic Reviews Double-down based on measured results Pivot or Persevere Kill the project
  69. 69. Semi-autonomous teams are responsible for determining the advisability of entrepreneurial ventures. This is not just for exploring an initial idea. These teams should be built for scale, and the board should be prepared to double down when they see validation. Islands of Freedom Model at Scale GROWTH BOARD GROWTH BOARD GROWTH BOARD
  70. 70. Yanking people Yanking budget Not letting people make their own mistakes Punishing mistakes Cancelling the project at the first sign of bad news Not holding teams accountable Changing accountability metrics without agreement Not providing a safe landing if the project is killed Things that kill trust
  71. 71. Prediction Go back to your Predictions Log and write down what actually happened during this session. Was your prediction correct? Then take a moment to write one or two sentences that predict what will happen in the next section, which is about PEOPLE.
  72. 72. People Consider the #1 hardest problem in beginning to scale Lean Startup
  73. 73. “Create a 100% dedicated, cross-functional team of 4- 5 people, instead of part-time committees” The hardest change
  74. 74. SETBACKS ● Part-time team ● Functional incentives ● No safe re-entry
  75. 75. Individuals will continue to be evaluated by their organizational silo for individual functional excellence. “Startup initiatives will fail because there was not enough accountability among team members for the success of the entire project.” The inevitable outcome of part- time startup teams
  76. 76. Consider a team member who is still being evaluated on performance in their pre-existing functional duties, who has no guarantee of safety if the innovation project should cease. That person can’t afford to spend their limited time on innovation projects, because doing so likely threatens their future.
  77. 77. If our engineer wrote elegant code... And if our marketer made great competetive analyses... And our designer made beautiful interfaces… And if that team built a product they couldn’t sell, it doesn’t matter that each hit their personal goal. We don’t want teams that are content to meet their personal, functional goals.
  78. 78. Tiny team, Tiny $$ LEVERAGE ● 100% Committed team ● Cross-functional team ● Results-based incentives ● Safe re-entry
  79. 79. ACTIVITY Imagine you’ve been asked to create one cross- functional startup team. You’re going to give them two weeks, 100% dedicated. You’re going to pursue one vision, and one vision only. Write down what you think will happen when you take that time to be 100% focused.
  80. 80. ACTIVITY 5 minutes to share with your partner.
  81. 81. Eric Ries’s “I think the team will have a sense of ownership the other teams lack. The productivity of the team will exceed that of teams these people have been part of in the past.” Mine The team will try to do too much. By the end of the first week, they will abandon half of what they were going to try. PREDICTIONS
  82. 82. Prediction Go back to your Predictions Log and write down what actually happened during this session. Was your prediction correct? Then take a moment to write one or two sentences that predict what will happen in the next section, which is about MONEY.
  83. 83. Money 30 minutes to consider project funding.
  84. 84. ROI is great for forecasting in markets where you’re firmly established.
  85. 85. “Measuring the ROI of an innovation project is like measuring an acorn and cutting off its water supply because it’s not yet an oak tree.” –Eric Ries
  86. 86. Metered Funding Using Innovation Accounting 1. Entrepreneurs request a set budget based on what they’ve learned so far. 2. Entrepreneurs and leaders agree to a set of metrics. 3. Entrepreneurs must show progress to be able to secure their next round. 4. Leader’s agree to continue support for the project as long as entrepreneurs agree that their strategy is working, or that they’re making proper adjustments based on their discoveries. 5. Leaders agree to cancel projects that are showing the least amount of progress rather than cutting budget from every project across the board.
  87. 87. Experiments Pivot/Persevere Metered Funding Process(Dollar amounts, team sizes, and durations are for example only) PROJECT IS INITIATED ● Entrepreneur is assigned/selected ● Team of 4 is assigned for 60 days ● Growth Board is formed ● $10k initial funding is awarded ● Board and entrepreneurs agree on Learning Metrics ● Growth Board monitors progress via Learning Metrics dashboard ● Growth Board reconvenes on a fixed schedule ● Based on learning (as seen in improved metrics), Growth Board awards $50k funding, expands team, extends another 2 quarters. GROWTH BOARD GROWTH BOARD ● Over time, the Growth Board makes larger investments based on continued learning (in the form of improving per-customer metrics) GROWTH BOARD Experiments Pivot/Persevere
  88. 88. ACTIVITY Ask yourself what success looks like. “We believe that everyone we approach is going to want our product.” Find a way to quantify that. “The sales funnel will have an 80% conversion rate.” Turn it into a per-customer metric. “For each customer we talk to, .8 will buy.” Do this for 3 metrics.
  89. 89. ACTIVITY 5 minutes to share with your partner.
  90. 90. Prediction Go back to your Predictions Log and write down what actually happened during this session. Was your prediction correct? Then take a moment to write one or two sentences that predict what will happen in the next section, which is about SCALE.
  91. 91. SCALE 30 minutes to consider how to roll this out across a large company.
  92. 92. In 3 years, Fastworks had a direct impact on every division, every function, and every global region. Hundreds of coaches and 5000 of the most-senior executives have been trained in the methodology The GE Story
  93. 93. GE Fastworks Year 1 10 Projects in Year 1. Executive sponsors cleared roadblocks and provided cover. Cross-functional teams prepared with a 3-day Lean Startup workshop. Project #1 Initial Pilot Chairman’s Project extreme case, real business value 2-5 Product Teams Started before the first was complete, after seeing only initial results 6-10 Process Teams Started before the first was complete, after seeing only initial results
  94. 94. GE Fastworks Success Plan Start: High-touch, consultant-led, small scope Later: Systematized, peer coaches, broad scope 1. Small transformation team 2. Workshops 3. Pilot projects 4. Executive support
  95. 95. Phase 1: The First 10 Wins/Losses 1. Identify teams 2. Select one key pilot project 3. Assign a mentor or coach with Lean Startup experience 4. Identify and train exec sponsors, growth board, managers 5. Add and train additional pilot teams 6. Track early successes to demonstrate to leadership that these methods can work across the company 7. Document the challenges teams face for later use in making cultural & systems changes
  96. 96. 1. Review with Pilot teams to learn about the larger cultural and systemic barriers 2. Executive session 3. Leadership training roadshow 4. More projects 5. Develop a coaching program to scale the number of coaches 6. Test new ways to fund projects and evaluate/place staff Common Phase 2 Experiments Fully dedicated teams vs. not fully dedicated Try out metered funding. Phase 2: Leadership Rollout & Coach Training
  97. 97. Phase 3: Deep Systems and Culture 1. Rallying cry of “Simplification” 2. Establish a new set of values statements that are aspirational and can guide behavior 3. Evaluate transparency, tools, and training
  98. 98. Collect your work from today into a 1- month plan ACTIVITY
  99. 99. Prediction Go back to your Predictions Log and write down what actually happened during this session. Was your prediction correct?
  100. 100. @jfraser Thank you! Dank u wel !

×