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How To Build A Marketing Plan with Design Thinking

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Marketing job is probably the most exciting job you can have in a company (I know I am biased). This is also a very challenging role as you lead the discussion for defining the commercial strategy and you are accountable to deliver it (show me the money). In this turbulent period with a lot of new changes (societal, technological, environmental,…), it is not so easy to know what to do. I have developed a process based on the Design Thinking Principles that, at least, helps me to take these decisions and you might be interested to discover it. This is the humble idea behind this ebook.

Enjoy the reading and don’t hesitate to comment, criticise or contribute.

Veröffentlicht in: Business

How To Build A Marketing Plan with Design Thinking

  1. 1. MARKETING STRATEGY IN 4 STEPSDESCRIBE, DESIGN, CHALLENGE & DISRUPT #DESIGNTHINKING #MARKETINGCANVAS
  2. 2. A VISUAL PRESENTATION BY LAURENT BOUTY
  3. 3. Hello, Marketing job is probably the most exciting job you can have in a company (I know I am biased). In this turbulent period with a lot of new changes (societal, technological, environmental,…), it is not so easy to know what to do. In the following slides, you will find a DO-IT- YOURSELF process for applying this methodology for your business (Startup, SME or Corporate companies). This is the humble idea behind this ebook. Enjoy the reading and don’t hesitate to comment, criticise or contribute. Laurent
  4. 4. Photo credit: Maria Stiehler, Unsplash One day, as an entrepreneur, you have to define how you will orchestrate your commercial activities and link this with your financial ambitions. This is a fantastic adventure where you will meet people, discuss processes, technologies and emotions. At the end, you will translate it into numbers. Usually, we call this exercise Strategic Marketing but it is not important how we call it as long as we do it.
  5. 5. WE ARE IN A VUCA WORLD VOLATILITY UNCERTAINTY COMPLEXITY AMBIQUITY
  6. 6. Photo credit: Andrew Neel, Unsplash PLANNING IS MORE AND MORE COMPLEX AND UNCERTAIN
  7. 7. WE DO HAVE MORE & MORE QUESTIONS HOW TO GROW? HOW TO AVOID COMMODITISATION? HOW TO LEAD THE DIGITAL REVOLUTION? HOW TO REINFORCE ENGAGEMENT? HOW TO CO-CREATE? HOW TO AUTOMATE MY ACTIVITIES? HOW TO BE MORE RESPONSIBLE? HOW TO ALIGN MY TEAM? …
  8. 8. DESIGN THINKING IS THE NEW WAY
  9. 9. HOW TO DESIGNYOUR PLAN?
  10. 10. YOU NEED LENSES For deciding what you should do, you need to ask the right questions and identify the most impacting actions. How to do it? By simply watching your commercial reality with the right lenses. 4P, 7P or 5C are fantastic lenses but are maybe less efficient today than in the past because the world has changed. Example: Product is important but it is not where you will make a difference. It has become an hygienic factor.Photo credit: Alvaro Serrano, Unsplash
  11. 11. 7 LENSES I use for answering these questions!
  12. 12. BrandHuman Value Propositions Journey Conversations Costs Revenue Streams MARKETING CANVAS by Laurent Bouty is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License. www.marketingcanvas.eu
  13. 13. MARKETING CANVAS by Laurent Bouty is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License. www.marketingcanvas.eu Human
  14. 14. HUMAN We are in a era Inspiration: Welcome to the Human Era, Lippincott
  15. 15. YOU ARE DEALING WITH HUMAN Before being a customer, buyer, user, segment or market, We are HUMAN. How could you be empathic with market or segment? You can only be empathic with Human. You are dealing with real persons.
  16. 16. Photo Credit: HUMAN from Yan Arthus Bertrand (Press Kit)
  17. 17. EMOTION MUTUALITY HARMONY EMPATHY INTEGRITY PURPOSE
  18. 18. Someone REAL Personas S.O.M. S.A.M. T.A.M.
  19. 19. Photo credit: “Adapting empathy maps for UX design.” Paul Boag (boagworld)
  20. 20. BE HUMAN USE PERSONAS VALIDATE MARKET When you develop your Marketing Plan, you should always start from real customers or potential buyers. What do they do with your services? How could you help them? Then you can develop personas (archetype of buyers/users) and finally you can validate your market assumptions. Interested in Personas? Have a look at Disciplined Entrepreneurship (Bill Aulet) or the work of Alan Cooper.
  21. 21. Brand
  22. 22. BRAND Your only protection against commoditisation is your Inspiration: Idriss Mootee, Marty Neumeier
  23. 23. IDEOLOGY Your Brand is your Inspiration: Idriss Mootee, Marty Neumeier
  24. 24. Why do you EXIST?
  25. 25. WHY HOW WHAT Start With WHY Inspiration: Simon Seinek
  26. 26. How do you BEHAVE? Brands are defined by what consumers say to each other about them, not what a brand says to consumers
  27. 27. PURPOSE ONLYNESS PASSION CONSISTENCY CARING SINCERE LISTENING AVAILABLE AGILE INVESTING EXCITING COMPETENT HONEST CHEERFUL SPIRITED IMAGINATIVE RESPONSIBLE CHARMING ROMANTIC RELIABLE GENUINE STRONG DARING EFFICIENT MEANING AUTHENTIC RELEVANT
  28. 28. IDEOLOGY BEHAVIOUR RELIABILITY DELIGHT CREATE TRUST Your brand is your more important asset. It takes years for building a brand but you can destroy it in few seconds. Interested in Brands? Have a look at the work of Marty Neumeier, Idris Mootee and Jean-Noel Kapferer.
  29. 29. Value Propositions
  30. 30. VALUE PROPOSITIONS How much of your Inspiration: Value Proposition Design generate actions from people
  31. 31. DO THEY QUEUE FOR YOU?
  32. 32. EMOTION SEEKING instead of PROBLEM RESOLUTION
  33. 33. CUSTOMERS BUY PRODUCT TO BUILD THEIR IDENTITIES Marty Neumeier, Brand Flip
  34. 34. Gain Creators Describe how your products and services create customer gains. How do they create benefits your customer expects, desires or would be surprised by, including functional utility, social gains, positive emotions, and cost savings? Do they… Create savings that make your customer happy? (e.g. in terms of time, money and effort, …) Produce outcomes your customer expects or that go beyond their expectations? (e.g. better quality level, more of something, less of something, …) Pain Relievers Copy or outperform current solutions that delight your customer? (e.g. regarding specific features, performance, quality, …) Make your customer’s job or life easier? (e.g. flatter learning curve, usability, accessibility, more services, lower cost of ownership, …) Create positive social consequences that your customer desires? (e.g. makes them look good, produces an increase in power, status, …) Do something customers are looking for? (e.g. good design, guarantees, specific or more features, …) Fulfill something customers are dreaming about? (e.g. help big achievements, produce big reliefs, …) Produce positive outcomes matching your customers success and failure criteria? (e.g. better performance, lower cost, …) Help make adoption easier? (e.g. lower cost, less investments, lower risk, better quality, performance, design, …) Rank each gain your products and services create according to its relevance to your customer. Is it substantial or insignificant? For each gain indicate how often it occurs. Describe how your products and services alleviate customer pains. How do they eliminate or reduce negative emotions, undesired costs and situations, and risks your customer experiences or could experience before, during, and after getting the job done? Do they… Produce savings? (e.g. in terms of time, money, or efforts, …) Make your customers feel better? (e.g. kills frustrations, annoyances, things that give them a headache, …) Fix underperforming solutions? (e.g. new features, better performance, better quality, …) Put an end to difficulties and challenges your customers encounter? (e.g. make things easier, helping them get done, eliminate resistance, …) Wipe out negative social consequences your customers encounter or fear? (e.g. loss of face, power, trust, or status, …) Eliminate risks your customers fear? (e.g. financial, social, technical risks, or what could go awfully wrong, …) Help your customers better sleep at night? (e.g. by helping with big issues, diminishing concerns, or eliminating worries, …) Limit or eradicate common mistakes customers make? (e.g. usage mistakes, …) Get rid of barriers that are keeping your customer from adopting solutions? (e.g. lower or no upfront investment costs, flatter learning curve, less resistance to change, …) Rank each pain your products and services kill according to their intensity for your customer. Is it very intense or very light? For each pain indicate how often it occurs. Risks your customer experiences or could experience before, during, and after getting the job done? Products & Services List all the products and services your value proposition is built around. Which products and services do you offer that help your customer get either a functional, social, or emotional job done, or help him/her satisfy basic needs? Which ancillary products and services help your customer perform the roles of: Buyer (e.g. products and services that help customers compare offers, decide, buy, take delivery of a product or service, …) Co-creator (e.g. products and services that help customers co-design solutions, otherwise contribute value to the solution, …) Transferrer (e.g. products and services that help customers dispose of a product, transfer it to others, or resell, …) Products and services may either by tangible (e.g. manufac- tured goods, face-to-face customer service), digital/virtual (e.g. downloads, online recommendations), intangible (e.g. copyrights, quality assurance), or financial (e.g. investment funds, financing services). Rank all products and services according to their importance to your customer. Are they crucial or trivial to your customer? Gains Describe the benefits your customer expects, desires or would be surprised by. This includes functional utility, social gains, positive emotions, and cost savings. Which savings would make your customer happy? (e.g. in terms of time, money and effort, …) What outcomes does your customer expect and what would go beyond his/her expectations? (e.g. quality level, more of something, less of something, …) How do current solutions delight your customer? (e.g. specific features, performance, quality, …) Pains Customer Job(s) Describe negative emotions, undesired costs and situations, and risks that your customer experiences or could experience before, during, and after getting the job done. What does your customer find too costly? (e.g. takes a lot of time, costs too much money, requires substantial efforts, …) What makes your customer feel bad? (e.g. frustrations, annoyances, things that give them a headache, …) How are current solutions underperforming for your customer? (e.g. lack of features, performance, malfunctioning, …) What are the main difficulties and challenges your customer encounters? (e.g. understanding how things work, difficulties getting things done, resistance, …) What negative social consequences does your customer encounter or fear? (e.g. loss of face, power, trust, or status, …) What risks does your customer fear? (e.g. financial, social, technical risks, or what could go awfully wrong, …) What’s keeping your customer awake at night? (e.g. big issues, concerns, worries, …) What common mistakes does your customer make? (e.g. usage mistakes, …) What barriers are keeping your customer from adopting solutions? (e.g. upfront investment costs, learning curve, resistance to change, …) Rank each pain according to the intensity it represents for your customer. Is it very intense or is it very light.? For each pain indicate how often it occurs. Describe what a specific customer segment is trying to get done. It could be the tasks they are trying to perform and complete, the problems they are trying to solve, or the needs they are trying to satisfy. What functional jobs are you helping your customer get done? (e.g. perform or complete a specific task, solve a specific problem, …) What social jobs are you helping your customer get done? (e.g. trying to look good, gain power or status, …) What emotional jobs are you helping your customer get done? (e.g. esthetics, feel good, security, …) What basic needs are you helping your customer satisfy? (e.g. communication, sex, …) Besides trying to get a core job done, your customer performs ancillary jobs in different roles. Describe the jobs your customer is trying to get done as: Buyer (e.g. trying to look good, gain power or status, …) Co-creator (e.g. esthetics, feel good, security, …) Transferrer (e.g. products and services that help customers dispose of a product, transfer it to others, or resell, …) Rank each job according to its significance to your customer. Is it crucial or is it trivial? For each job indicate how often it occurs. Outline in which specific context a job is done, because that may impose constraints or limitations. (e.g. while driving, outside, …) What would make your customer’s job or life easier? (e.g. flatter learning curve, more services, lower cost of ownership, …) What positive social consequences does your customer desire? (e.g. makes them look good, increase in power, status, …) What are customers looking for? (e.g. good design, guarantees, specific or more features, …) What do customers dream about? (e.g. big achievements, big reliefs, …) How does your customer measure success and failure? (e.g. performance, cost, …) What would increase the likelihood of adopting a solution? (e.g. lower cost, less investments, lower risk, better quality, performance, design, …) Rank each gain according to its relevance to your customer. Is it substantial or is it insignificant? For each gain indicate how often it occurs. Value Proposition Customer Segment PROBLEM PAIN GAIN CHOICES SIMPLIFY FIT CO-CREATION PROTOTYPE TEST Photo credit: “Vale Proposition Canvas” Strategyzer
  35. 35. For …………………………………..… (Personas) Who …………………….. (Emotions seeking) Our (Value Proposition) …….……………..… Is ……………………………………….……(Benefit) Unlike ………….……………………(Alternative) Adapted from Geoff Moore
  36. 36. SEEK EMOTIONS FIT PERSONAS CREATE VALUE Your brand is your more important asset. It takes years for building a brand but you can destroy it in few seconds. Interested in Value Proposition? Have a look at the work of Strategyzer, Steve Blank and Jean-Noel Kapferer.
  37. 37. Journey
  38. 38. JOURNEY See your operations through customer’s eyes. Map their overall Inspiration: Alain Thys and get a new perspective of your business
  39. 39. PERSONAS TIMELINE TOUCHPOINTS EMOTIONS CHANNELS BRILLIANT BASICS LIKE MOMENTS MOMENT OF TRUTH
  40. 40. PERSONAS TIMELINE TOUCHPOINTS EMOTIONS CHANNELS BRILLIANT BASICS LIKE MOMENTS MOMENT OF TRUTH
  41. 41. REFLECT CUSTOMER’S IDENTITY SATISFIES OBJECTIVES MEETS EXPECTATIONS EFFORTLESS SOCIAL PLEASURE CUSTOMER IN CONTROL SENSORY PLEASURE STRESS FREE CONSIDERS THE EMOTION Credit: Watkinson, The ten principles behind great customer experiences
  42. 42. PEOPLE PERSPECTIVE ORCHESTRATE INTERACTIONS MOMENTS OF TRUTH Customer Journey is fundamental as it describes the essence of the whole experience from the customer’s perspective. It is also a great tool for gaining internal consensus on how customer should be treated across distinct channels. Interested in Journey mapping and Experience? Have a look at the work of Adaptive Path, Watkinson, Brian Solis, McKinsey and Futurelab.
  43. 43. Conversations
  44. 44. CONVERSATIONS Customers don’t want Ads, They want Inspiration: Fastcompany
  45. 45. Photo credit: Ben White, Unsplash It’s what they say that matters
  46. 46. WHERE DO YOU HAVE CONVERSATIONS?
  47. 47. LISTEN CO-CREATE ENGAGE INFLUENCERS BUILD STORIES TECHNOLOGY MARRIES CREATIVITY ORIGINALITY CROWDCULTURE TRIBES
  48. 48. LISTEN & CO-CREATE AMPLIFY CONVERSATIONS ENGAGE CUSTOMER Your brand is your more important asset. It takes years for building a brand but you can destroy it in few seconds. Interested in Conversations? Have a look at the work of HBR.org, Brand Quarterly, Seth Godin and many other though leaders.
  49. 49. Financials
  50. 50. How Much Human Have You Converted As User How Much Value Propositions Are They Using SHORT TERM REVENUES ARE DRIVEN BY MARKETING CANVAS by Laurent Bouty is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License. www.marketingcanvas.eu
  51. 51. EXAMPLE: SHORT TERM REVENUES 1M€ 10,000 100€ Users Revenue/year 1M€ 100,000 10€ OR
  52. 52. MARKETING CANVAS by Laurent Bouty is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License. Revenue Streams LONG TERM REVENUES ARE DRIVEN BY How Much Human Have You Converted As User? How Much Value Propositions Are They Using? How Strong Is Your Relationship With Your Users ? www.marketingcanvas.eu
  53. 53. LONG TERM REVENUE Apple iPhone repurchase intentions 25 0,5 75 1 iPhone Android Windows 53% 25% 5% 37% 75% 95% Will Repurchase Will Change Source: Bernstein Global Telecom team’s Survey, 2012 0,15 0,3 0,45 0,6 FY11 FY12E FY13E FY14E FY15E 53% 45% 36% 27% 23% Recurrent Profit
  54. 54. MARKETING CANVAS by Laurent Bouty is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License. LONG TERM REVENUES ARE … …TOTAL EXPERIENCE www.marketingcanvas.eu TOTAL EXPERIENCE
  55. 55. MARKETING CANVAS by Laurent Bouty is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License. Costs SHORT TERM COSTS ARE DRIVEN BY How Much You Pay For Your Interactions? How Much You Pay For Your Conversations? www.marketingcanvas.eu
  56. 56. MARKETING CANVAS by Laurent Bouty is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License. Costs LONG TERM COSTS ARE DRIVEN BY How Much You Pay For Your Interactions? How Much You Pay For Your Conversations? How Strong Is Your Brand? www.marketingcanvas.eu
  57. 57. BE HUMAN USE PERSONAS VALIDATE MARKET IDEOLOGY BEHAVIOUR RELIABILITY DELIGHT CREATE TRUST SEEK EMOTIONS FIT PERSONAS CREATE VALUE PEOPLE PERSPECTIVE ORCHESTRATE INTERACTIONS MOMENTS OF TRUTH LISTEN & CO-CREATE AMPLIFY CONVERSATIONS ENGAGE CUSTOMER SOME TAKE-AWAYS
  58. 58. HOW TO BUILD YOUR PLAN? Photo credit: Sandal Deen, Unsplash
  59. 59. FINANCIALS STRATEGIC CHOICES ACTIONS EXECUTION THE DIFFICULTY IS TO CONNECT FINANCIALS, STRATEGIC CHOICES AND ACTIONS ?
  60. 60. IT’S AN ITERATIVE PROCESS Photo credit: Patrick McManaman, Unsplash
  61. 61. MARKETING CANVAS by Laurent Bouty is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License. www.marketingcanvas.eu YOU NEED A MARKETING CANVAS Brand Value Propositions Conversations Journey Human Revenue StreamsCosts
  62. 62. What are the most important costs inherent in our business model? Which Key Resources are most expensive? Which Key Activities are most expensive? Through which Channels do our Customer Segments want to be reached? How are we reaching them now? How are our Channels integrated? Which ones work best? Which ones are most cost-efficient? How are we integrating them with customer routines? For what value are our customers really willing to pay? For what do they currently pay? How are they currently paying? How would they prefer to pay? How much does each Revenue Stream contribute to overall revenues? For whom are we creating value? Who are our most important customers? What type of relationship does each of our Customer Segments expect us to establish and maintain with them? Which ones have we established? How are they integrated with the rest of our business model? How costly are they? What value do we deliver to the customer? Which one of our customer’s problems are we helping to solve? What bundles of products and services are we offering to each Customer Segment? Which customer needs are we satisfying? What Key Activities do our Value Propositions require? Our Distribution Channels? Customer Relationships? Revenue streams? Who are our Key Partners? Who are our key suppliers? Which Key Resources are we acquiring from partners? Which Key Activities do partners perform? What Key Resources do our Value Propositions require? Our Distribution Channels? Customer Relationships? Revenue Streams? Day Month Year No. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ or send a letter to Creative Commons, 171 Second Street, Suite 300, San Francisco, California, 94105, USA. MARKETING CANVAS by Laurent Bouty is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License. www.bouty.net THE MARKETING CANVAS Brand Value Propositions Conversations Journey Human Revenue StreamsCosts YOU NEED A FOCAL POINT, A BUSINESS MODEL AND A MARKETING MODEL Your Focal Point Your Rallying Vision
  63. 63. MARKETING CANVAS by Laurent Bouty is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License. www.marketingcanvas.eu Current Situation Describe/Design your business with Marketing Canvas Marketing situation using the 7 lenses Financial Challenges Marketing Ideation Marketing Solution Identify Brakes and Accelerator for achieving your financial objectives Ideate on potential changes for Human, Brand, Value Proposition(s), Journey and Conversation(s) Prioritise changes for Human, Brand, Value Proposition(s), Journey and Conversation Find the Right Marketing Problem Find the Right Marketing Solution SET YOUR STRATEGY IN 4 STEPS
  64. 64. All OPEX spent for your Value Propositions, Journey and Conversations BrandHuman Value Propositions Journey Conversations Costs Revenue Streams MARKETING CANVAS by Laurent Bouty is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License. www.marketingcanvas.eu DESCRIBE YOUR BUSINESS WITH THE FOLLOWING LENSES Often referred as Client or User, the real person behind it as emotions and you should understand them. Why you do business is more important than how you do business. The Brand describes this ideology. Value Propositions are the reason why people take actions with you and how you monetise it. It is your operations through customer’s eyes. It is a non linear of divergent and convergent activities. All communications with customer through Paid, Earned, Owned or Shared Media. The monetisation of your business generated from all paid transactions.
  65. 65. DESIGN YOUR BUSINESS BY CONNECTING THE LENSES 1. HUMAN - BRAND 2. HUMAN - VALUE PROPOSITIONS 3. HUMAN - JOURNEY 4. HUMAN - CONVERSATIONS 5. BRAND - VALUE PROPOSITIONS 6. BRAND - JOURNEY 7. BRAND - CONVERSATIONS 8. VALUE PROPOSITIONS - JOURNEY 9. VALUE PROPOSITIONS - CONVERSATIONS 10.JOURNEY - CONVERSATIONS The lack of consistency between key Lenses is often the root cause of Marketing ineffectiveness. The Marketing Canvas allows you to easily identified where gaps exist in your strategy. www.marketingcanvas.eu MARKETING CANVAS by Laurent Bouty is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.
  66. 66. IDENTIFY YOUR BUSINESS CHALLENGES FOR FUTURE GROWTH BRAKES ACCELERATORS What are the brakes that block me to reach my objectives in the future? What are the accelerators that block me to reach my objectives in the future? MARKETING CANVAS by Laurent Bouty is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License. www.marketingcanvas.eu + -
  67. 67. COST/REV AS IS CORE ADJACENT TRANSFORMATIONAL HUMAN Reach Objectives with Current Marketing Canvas (Continue as it is - example many companies are keeping doing the same without any change) Reach Objectives by Optimising Marketing Canvas (Improvements without introducing new elements in your strategy. You do thinks better - example Apple introducing a new version of iPhone) Reach Objectives by Expanding Marketing Canvas (New elements in one or many building blocks like new value propositions, new market, … - example BMW acquiring Mini) Reach Objectives by Changing the Business Model and the Marketing Canvas (Disruption of your business model with new opportunities - example Amazon starting Cloud Web services) BRAND VALUE PROPOSITIONS JOURNEY CONVERSATION IDEATE ON POTENTIAL CHANGES NEEDED FOR ACHIEVING YOUR OBJECTIVES www.marketingcanvas.eu MARKETING CANVAS by Laurent Bouty is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.
  68. 68. CHANGES USER ? TRANSACTION ? PRICE ? REVENUE COSTS HUMAN BRAND VALUE PROPOSITIONS JOURNEY CONVERSATION PRIORITISE CHANGES FOR YOUR BUSINESS BASED ON YOUR FINANCIAL DRIVERS? www.marketingcanvas.eu MARKETING CANVAS by Laurent Bouty is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.
  69. 69. LENSES HUMAN INITIATIVES REVENUES COSTS BRAND VALUE PROPOSITIONS JOURNEY CONVERSATION ∑ ∑ CONSOLIDATE YOUR INITIATIVES IN A SIMPLE ACTIONABLE PLAN www.marketingcanvas.eu MARKETING CANVAS by Laurent Bouty is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.
  70. 70. SET THE TEAM FILL THE CANVAS DISCUSS BRAKES DISCUSS ACCELERATORS ANSWER KEY QUESTIONS REVIEW FINANCIALS YOU NEED TO CO-CREATE AND COLLABORATE START WITH FINANCIAL GOALS
  71. 71. APPLICATIONS SOME
  72. 72. MARKETING CANVAS by Laurent Bouty is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License. HOW TO GROW? INCREASE CONVERSION ENHANCE VALUE PROPOSITIONS INCREASE CONVERSATION www.marketingcanvas.eu
  73. 73. MARKETING CANVAS by Laurent Bouty is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License. HOW TO AVOID COMMODITISATION? ENHANCE EXPERIENCE ENHANCE VALUE PROPOSITIONS ENHANCE BRAND www.marketingcanvas.eu
  74. 74. MARKETING CANVAS by Laurent Bouty is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License. HOW TO LEAD THE DIGITAL REVOLUTION? DIGITIZE INTERACTION DIGITIZE VALUE PROPOSITIONS DIGITIZE CONVERSATION www.marketingcanvas.eu
  75. 75. MARKETING CANVAS by Laurent Bouty is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License. HOW TO REINFORCE ENGAGEMENT? MORE LIKE MOMENTS MORE EMOTIONS MORE UNPAID CONVERSATION MORE TRUST www.marketingcanvas.eu
  76. 76. MARKETING CANVAS by Laurent Bouty is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License. HOW TO CO-CREATE? CO-CREATE CO-CREATE www.marketingcanvas.eu
  77. 77. MARKETING CANVAS by Laurent Bouty is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License. HOW TO AUTOMATE? MORE AUTOMATED INTERACTIONS MORE AUTOMATED CONVERSATION www.marketingcanvas.eu
  78. 78. MARKETING CANVAS by Laurent Bouty is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License. HOW TO BE MORE RESPONSIBLE? BENEFIT HUMAN PEOPLE MATTERED POSITIVE IMPACT www.marketingcanvas.eu
  79. 79. MARKETING CANVAS by Laurent Bouty is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License. www.marketingcanvas.eu HOW TO REINFORCE HUMANNESS IN A DIGITAL WORLD? EMOTIONAL ENGAGEMENT BENEFIT HUMANS POLITENESS EMOTIONAL STRESS-FREE TOLERANT CONTEXTUAL IMPROVE WELL-BEING AND QUALITY OF LIFE SENTIENCE INTIMACY PERSONALITY PROXIMITY SIMPLICITY
  80. 80. MARKETING CANVAS by Laurent Bouty is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License. HOW TO ALIGN MY TEAM? CANVAS IS A SIMPLE YET POWERFUL TOOL FOR ACHIEVING THIS ALIGNMENT www.marketingcanvas.eu
  81. 81. READY?
  82. 82. THANK YOU
  83. 83. ABOUT THE AUTHOR Laurent Bouty is Academic Director of an Advanced Master in Creativity and Marketing at Solvay Brussels School and Partner of FUTURELAB. Connect me on LinkedIN or Twitter (@lbouty)
  84. 84. HOW TO BUILD A MARKETING PLAN by Laurent Bouty is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.

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