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Innovative methods in architectural education

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Innovative methods in architectural education

  1. 1. INNOVATIVE methods in Architectural Education: Ar. Kenny P. Joy M. Arch, M. Plan ACMA 2014
  2. 2. INTRODUCTION 1 Urban Designer – Planner - Academician 2008 – B. Arch, National Institute of Technology, Calicut 2008 – Architect, Total Environment, Bangalore 2009 – Project Architect, Kumar Group, Kochi 2013 – M. Arch (Urban design) & M. Plan (Urban & regional planning) CEPT, Ahmadabad – Research Associate, CRDC a design & research cell of CEPT Ahmadabad - Founded with partners Drishti Studios – Architecture + Urbanism (Bangalore, Kochi, Abudhabi) - Member of Kochi based NGO – KUDS (Kerala Urban Development Society) - Joined Holy Crescent College of Architecture, Alwaye, Kochi as a full time faculty member
  3. 3. INTRODUCTION TO THE TOPIC New approaches or alternative thinking towards imparting architectural education more effectively as some of the methods suggested here may be already been practiced in other parts of the country in different forms. Effective learning – Making maximum use of whatever is learnt & reducing wastage of what is learnt Not tested scientifically through pedagogic experiments but through experience and observation (in short duration) based study and arriving at logical solutions to the problems with some conventional practiced used in the context Study based on samples of students – contextual - General socio economic background - Exposure before & during the course
  4. 4. DESIGN ESSENTIALLY IS A SOLUTION TO A PROBLEM; WHERE THE PROBLEM IS DEFINED BY USER & USE
  5. 5. CONVENTIONAL METHODS A look into the existing methodology followed in the architectural programme in the context 2
  6. 6. CONVENTIONAL APPROACH IN TEACHING Schools - Conventionally followed teaching system was predominantly through classroom based oral classes. Advent of new practices like audio visual methods & interactive methods More practical application based methods (like DPEP system) where students engage in activities of day to day life and learn through them In school, a large amount of theories and subjects are taught of which very few the students encounter or apply later in the life or career. Architecture – Is a professional course where the subjects you learn need to be applied in practice or career More of preaching than teaching: Introducing the student to the world of design based on understanding of the technology physiographic sociology and varied other subjects that affect the decision making in design of a product.
  7. 7. CONVENTIONAL METHODS IF A SUBJECT IS TAUGHT IN A PROFESSIONAL COURSE, IT SHOULD HAVE A PURPOSE & APPLICATION IN THE PROFESSION 1 2 3 4 5 MATHS VISUAL ARTS BASIC DESIGN GRAPHICS STRUCTURES 1 BUILDING CONST. 1 DESIGN STUDIO 1 YEAR STRUCTURES 2 TOPICS COVERED ? STRUCTURES 3 STRUCTURES 4 BUILDING CONST. 2 BUILDING CONST. 3 BUILDING CONST. 4 DESIGN STUDIO 2 DESIGN STUDIO 3 DESIGN STUDIO 4 THESIS APPLICATION OF
  8. 8. LEARNING A brief examination of the basics of learning science and the psychology associated with it 3
  9. 9. YOU CAN TEACH A STUDENT A LESSON FOR A DAY; BUT IF YOU CAN TEACH HIM TO LEARN BY CREATING CURIOSITY, HE WILL CONTINUE THE LEARNING PROCESS AS LONG AS HE LIVES CLAY P. BEDFORD
  10. 10. OUR SENSES EVOLVED TO WORK TOGETHER – VISION INFLUENCING HEARING, FOR EXAMPLE – WHICH MEANS THAT WE LEARN BEST IF WE STIMULATE SEVERAL SENSES AT ONCE JOHN MEDINA
  11. 11. Source: http://edudemic.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/7-styles-of-learning. jpg
  12. 12. THE BEST WAY TO LEARN IS TO DO; THE WORST WAY TO TEACH IS TO TALK PAUL HAMOS
  13. 13. LEARNING PYRAMID AVERAGE RETENTION RATES 5% 10% 20% 30% 50% 75% LECTURE READING AUDIO VISUAL DEMONSTRATION GROUP DISCUSSION PRACTICE 90% TEACHING OTHERS (Edgar Dale, 1969)
  14. 14. EDUCATIONAL PYSCHOLOGY :BETTER WAYS OF LEARNING • Memory improvement basics •Keep learning and practicing new things •Learn in multiple ways •Teach what you’ve learned to another person •Gain practical experience
  15. 15. SHIFT IN THE APPROACH A glance into how the approach in preaching architecture is given an alternative direction 4
  16. 16. SHIFT IN THE METHODOLOGY •Hands on workshops for various sub courses within the programme – DESIGN, BUILD & MAINTAIN • Educating professionals requires practicing professionals and academics to work closely together. The System here works as a collaborative of academicians and practitioners. Practitioners adept at decision-making bring their experience to classrooms and academics impart a more thoughtful and critical approach. • STUDIO OR LAB BASED LEARNING- Effective learning through continuous & multi dimensional learning – application of theories in studios
  17. 17. YOU CANNOT TEACH A MAN ANYTHING, YOU CAN ONLY HELP HIM FIND IT WITHIN HIMSELF GALILEO GALILEI
  18. 18. NEW APPROACHES IN DESIGN STUDIO The studio is a sub course within the architecture course, which shapes up the design skills of an architecture student through the entire course of five year undergraduate programme. Pedagogical scientists in the field of architectural education have proven that the studio or application based study gives a much better understanding of the subject. Taking this forward into the next level our programme is molded in such a way that each subject contributes to the studio and in return the studio makes the student comprehend the subject and the theories in it more effectively. When there is an application of a theory, there is an extensive involvement of the student in applying the theories or techniques into his or her design through the design process.
  19. 19. EXPERIENCE HAS SHOWN THAT STUDENTS LEARN TECHNICAL SKILLS MORE EFFICIENTLY AND INCORPORATE THEM MORE READILY INTO THE BUILDING DESIGN PROCESS WHEN THE SKILLS ARE ACQUIRED ON AN AS-NEEDED BASIS DURING ONGOING DESIGN PROJECTS (Allen, 1997)
  20. 20. NEW APPROACHES IN DESIGN STUDIO INTEGRATIVE STUDIO APPROACH STRUCTURES MATHS BUILDING CONST. GRAPHICS VISUAL ARTS BASIC DESIGN DESIGN
  21. 21. NEW APPROACHES IN DESIGN STUDIO Investigating into the intention of a design studio in an architectural programme, it emerges out that the prime focus on exercising the studio with the students, should be on the ‘process’ rather than the ‘product’. In the past, it is observed that this purpose of the studio is achieved to a satisfactory level in very few institutions across the country. The key reason responsible for this plight is the use of an inappropriate methodology. As a new attitude towards this, the studio can take themes in each level (like biomimcry, sustainability etc.). They can be taken forward through multiple staged studies in understanding of the theme. Periodic exercises which defined the expected process in a design programme. The studio essentially should be given without an initial introduction of the design output. The design studio outputs - different media of presentation like still & dynamic models, animations, drama based presentations as well as movies.
  22. 22. THE BEST TEACHERS DON’T GIVE YOU THE ANSWERS. THEY JUST POINT THE WAY AND LET YOU MAKE YOUR OWN CHOICES YOUR OWN MISTAKES. THAT WAY YOU GET ALL THE GLORY AND YOU DESERVE IT. SHUESTER
  23. 23. CONVENTIONAL APPROACHES IN DESIGN STUDIO Design brief Data Large unwanted data set Case study concept Design •Look into everything about case study. •Tendency to adapt functional layout, design features etc. irrelevant case studies Tendency of losing originality Direct product intent •Product - a result of multiple stage ‘inspirations’ or adaptations from case studies.
  24. 24. NEW APPROACHES IN DESIGN STUDIO Design brief Data Case study concept Design Cases and studies relevant for concepts & ideas Multi stage process multi directional evolved design assured Design & problem responsive indirect product intent STUDIO THEME
  25. 25. ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN STUDIO 4 - Studio theme: Bio-mimicry “If we are prepared, as apparently we are, for our buildings to look like animals and plants, perhaps we should be looking to make them function like them as well. There’s a latent interest in biology, but little actual knowledge” - Hugh Aldresey-Williams The architectural profession is rapidly embracing digital design technologies developed and applied in the framework of biologically inspired processes. Putting it simply, nature is the largest laboratory that ever existed and ever will. While bio-mimicry does not exclude emulating form, design resides in the processes and systems. The characteristics and processes of the natural environment can inspire the design of the built environment.
  26. 26. Task 1 Understanding systems of nature •Choose any organism or its product •Deduct the various processes that undergoes within its system •Identify the various components of the system or various elements which go into the making of the system •Correlate each of the components and analyze how each of them contribute into the whole system Exercise: Using various media of expression including model (static or dynamic), collages, photographs, video, animation explain: •The reason for choosing the object under study •The various functions of and process undergoing within the object Task 2 Reasoning the form •Evaluate the form of the object or organism under study. •Deduct the relation of the form or shape of various individual components of the object with its function. •Reason the form of the entire object under study as supportive to its entire system. Exercise Using abstract models and evolution diagrams explain: •The relationship of the form with system and its functions. Task 3 Live and learn concepts •From the past experiences in your school life and other, elaborate your understanding of an environment conducive to learn for a group of students in the age group 4 to15. •Elaborate your understanding of living concepts associated with learning environments. •Illustrate how they •can be created in reality. •Illustrate how can they be materialized using the conceptual adaptations of biomimicry each one of you have adopted?
  27. 27. WHAT’S POPULAR IS NOT ALWAYS RIGHT, WHAT’S RIGHT IS NOT ALWAYS POPULAR
  28. 28. NEW APPROACHES IN DEIGN STUDIO STUDENT RESPONSIVE STUDIO INPUTS & TRAINING CATEGORY 1 CATEGORY 2 STUDIO GUIDE CATEGORY 3
  29. 29. LEARNING BUILDING MATERIALS & CONSTRUCTION HANDS ON DESIGN BUILD METHOD is the one & only method to learn this subject effectively In campus Workshops under guidance of Experts practicing in each construction technique – Eg: Arte Barro , a mud based construction, under the guidance of Ar. Vinu Daniel was one which was popular within architectural schools of the state Workshop course - Masonry, Carpentry, Electrical & Plumbing services: To scale models & installations
  30. 30. LEARNING VISUAL ARTS / BASIC DESIGN Visual Arts and basic design are specializations or skills inevitable in developing a sense of aesthetics in a design based course like architecture. Teaching to make works of arts as works of public appreciation, the students can be given the task of conducting a public exhibition of their works with a targeted sale of their products.
  31. 31. LEARNING BUILDING STRUCTURES Students who pursue design based courses , in comparison with those who take up theory based courses like pure science, engineering, economic science, language etc., are more driven or pulled by visual information or physical entities - as the main intention of the course is to produce design of a physical entity. The structural design and related subjects shall be introduced through model making sessions of various structural systems, animations or other visual representations – they physically relate themselves with the structural principles when they kinesthetically experience them.
  32. 32. LEARNING LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE On application based approach Sensitivization towards plants or plant life – ‘MY PLANT’ Landscape workshop Hands on design and construct programme with an application of in designing various spaces within the campus Design build & SEE - in campus structures. Learn about life & maintenance of each structure they design
  33. 33. LEARNING URBAN DESIGN In syllabus – introduced in 3rd year – not exposed in dealing with multiple buildings in design studio or spaces in between buildings Sensitivization towards publics realm & urban design – Classroom based discussions & debates MY CITY – Continuous OBSERVATION & ANALYSIS project Application of urban design principles in institutional township design studio
  34. 34. LEARNING ARCHITECTURE & CULTURE BY TRAVEL Architectural education is not one which can be imparted within the walls of a class room. Understanding architecture be better done through various cultures where they get evolved through a time tested process of evolution of the built form, technology and character, should be the main intention behind the study tours. Study tours - in a systematic programme with pre tour presentations, on site discussions and talks, sketching & photography exercise, movie making etc. Documentation – a well illustrated travelogue
  35. 35. IN CAMPUS DESIGN & RESEARCH CELL Collaboration of Architectural education and practice culminates in its highest level at a place where they both meet – CAMPUS Regular exposure of students to practice & an opportunity at door step to get trained themselves before internship as well as professional practice. Develop a research oriented academic atmosphere within the campus - research is one of the highest levels in which an institute can contribute to the nation Keeping the faculty engage in practice more synchronous with the academics Potential contributions to the city and its people for a wide range of services the faculty team is specialized in. Wide the range of service, larger the exposure of students to multiple disciplines within architecture.
  36. 36. STUDENT RESPONSIVE SKILL DEVELOPMENT COMMUNICATION SKETCHING ZERO HOUR DISCUSSION READING
  37. 37. An initiative from a visionary management and an inspirational dean, together with a young dynamic faculty team to put the extra effort to achieve an educational system which is far more effective in preaching architecture and thereby raise the quality of architectural education within the state & country
  38. 38. THANK YOU

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