Diese Präsentation wurde erfolgreich gemeldet.
Die SlideShare-Präsentation wird heruntergeladen. ×

What is transparency?

Ad

Hello!I am Jordan Husney
I’m CEO of Parabol
You can find me at @jrhusney

Ad

1.
An anecdote
From the Fortune
500

Ad

The New Management Team

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Wird geladen in …3
×

Hier ansehen

1 von 57 Anzeige
1 von 57 Anzeige

What is transparency?

Herunterladen, um offline zu lesen

Exploring transparency a design choice within an organization, how to enable it, and why it may necessary to succeed in the internet age by Jordan Husney, CEO of Parabol (https://parabol.co)

Exploring transparency a design choice within an organization, how to enable it, and why it may necessary to succeed in the internet age by Jordan Husney, CEO of Parabol (https://parabol.co)

Anzeige
Anzeige

Weitere Verwandte Inhalte

Anzeige

What is transparency?

  1. 1. Hello!I am Jordan Husney I’m CEO of Parabol You can find me at @jrhusney
  2. 2. 1. An anecdote From the Fortune 500
  3. 3. The New Management Team
  4. 4. ‘’ #10 If you could change anything about the way you were raised, what would it be?The 36 Questions That Lead to Love Source: http://www.nytimes.com/2015/01/11/fashion/no-37-big-wedding-or-small.html
  5. 5. ‘’ #17 What is your most treasured memory? The 36 Questions That Lead to Love Source: http://www.nytimes.com/2015/01/11/fashion/no-37-big-wedding-or-small.html
  6. 6. ‘’ #30 When did you last cry in front of another person? By yourself? The 36 Questions That Lead to Love Source: http://www.nytimes.com/2015/01/11/fashion/no-37-big-wedding-or-small.html
  7. 7. All Our Patents Are Belong To You Trust begins with intimacy
  8. 8. 2. What it isn’t Understanding transparency in contrast
  9. 9. Transparency isn’t... Secrecy: the intentional or unintentional withholding of information
  10. 10. Transparency isn’t... Secrecy: the intentional or unintentional withholding of information Ambiguity: uncertain or inexact information
  11. 11. 3. What it is A working definition
  12. 12. Via negativa... Transparency is the ready availability of explicit information. ...what else does that sounds like?
  13. 13. The Internet.
  14. 14. A new cultural norm?
  15. 15. Resistance is futile?
  16. 16. In the end, transparency is a design choice.
  17. 17. 4. Levels Three areas of focus
  18. 18. Individual Team Organization 1 2 3
  19. 19. 5. The individual Transparency as a value
  20. 20. The hidden cost of surface acting In 2013, Shanock et. al demonstrated workers who believe their colleagues are acting authentically, perceive their meetings as being more effective.
  21. 21. Bring your full candid self In 2016, we conducted a study adding evidence which showed individuals who believe they are able to be their “full candid self” at the office also believe their meetings are more effective.
  22. 22. My friend Spencer Wright @pencerw
  23. 23. @pencerw
  24. 24. @pencerw
  25. 25. @pencerw
  26. 26. Do ShareLearn Honest Feedback
  27. 27. 6. The team Transparency as a practice
  28. 28. Write everything down
  29. 29. So it can be changed
  30. 30. INTERNAL TO TEAM EXTERNAL TO TEAM
  31. 31. PLAN (e.g. 2 months, 2 weeks, 2 days) INTERNAL TO TEAM EXTERNAL TO TEAM
  32. 32. PLAN (e.g. 2 months, 2 weeks, 2 days) INTERNAL TO TEAM EXTERNAL TO TEAM POLICIES & PERMISSIONS
  33. 33. PLAN (e.g. 2 months, 2 weeks, 2 days) ROLES INTERNAL TO TEAM EXTERNAL TO TEAM POLICIES & PERMISSIONS
  34. 34. PLAN (e.g. 2 months, 2 weeks, 2 days) ROLES PROJECTS & ACTIONS INTERNAL TO TEAM EXTERNAL TO TEAM POLICIES & PERMISSIONS
  35. 35. PLAN (e.g. 2 months, 2 weeks, 2 days) ROLES PROJECTS & ACTIONS PROGRESS & CHANGES INTERNAL TO TEAM EXTERNAL TO TEAM POLICIES & PERMISSIONS
  36. 36. PLAN (e.g. 2 months, 2 weeks, 2 days) ROLES PROJECTS & ACTIONS SERVICE DIRECTORY & API PROGRESS & CHANGES INTERNAL TO TEAM EXTERNAL TO TEAM POLICIES & PERMISSIONS
  37. 37. 7. The organization Transparency as a strategy
  38. 38. All Our Patent Are Belong To You
  39. 39. 8. In summary What does it all mean?
  40. 40. The Internet hasn’t finished reshaping us
  41. 41. Transparency... ▣ ...may become the new workforce expectation
  42. 42. Transparency... ▣ ...may become the new workforce expectation ▣ ...is built on intimacy and creates trust
  43. 43. Transparency... ▣ ...may become the new workforce expectation ▣ ...is built on intimacy and creates trust ▣ ...enables feedback loops
  44. 44. Transparency... ▣ ...may become the new workforce expectation ▣ ...is built on intimacy and creates trust ▣ ...enables feedback loops ▣ ...includes individuals, teams, and organizations
  45. 45. Transparency... ▣ ...may become the new workforce expectation ▣ ...is built on intimacy and creates trust ▣ ...enables feedback loops ▣ ...includes individuals, teams, and organizations ▣ ...cannot be dictated from the top
  46. 46. Transparency... ▣ ...may become the new workforce expectation ▣ ...is built on intimacy and creates trust ▣ ...enables feedback loops ▣ ...includes individuals, teams, and organizations ▣ ...cannot be dictated from the top ▣ ...means writing it all down so it can be changed
  47. 47. Transparency... ▣ ...may become the new workforce expectation ▣ ...is built on intimacy and creates trust ▣ ...enables feedback loops ▣ ...includes individuals, teams, and organizations ▣ ...cannot be dictated from the top ▣ ...means writing it all down so it can be changed ▣ ...may be good organizational strategy
  48. 48. Transparency... ▣ ...may become the new workforce expectation ▣ ...is built on intimacy and creates trust ▣ ...enables feedback loops ▣ ...includes individuals, teams, and organizations ▣ ...cannot be dictated from the top ▣ ...means writing it all down so it can be changed ▣ ...may be good organizational strategy
  49. 49. Thanks! Any questions? You can find me at @jrhusney jordan@parabol.co © 2016 Parabol, Inc
  50. 50. Photo Acknowledgements ▣ “Coffee in the morning” by Chichacha: https://www.flickr.com/photos/chichacha/2471138966/ ▣ “Colocation” by Atomic Taco: https://www.flickr.com/photos/atomictaco/7960716222
  51. 51. Iconography ▣ Arrange by by Gregor Črešnar ▣ Broadcast by Amy Chiang ▣ Document by Brian Gonzalez ▣ Graph by Icon Mafia ▣ Group by Angie Reyes ▣ Reading by Creative Stall ▣ Sliders by Arthur Shlain ▣ Work by Jared Fanning

Hinweis der Redaktion

  • At Parabol, we creating software to make work smarter and more meaningful. I’m here to talk to you about transparency.
  • Last year, I was privileged to work with a new leadership team of a Fortune 500 here in NYC. My colleagues & I were hired primarily to affect attrition in a department which had crested 30%. Departing staff felt the department wasn’t ‘transparent’ enough. They lacked autonomy. A funny thing would happen after meeting with our executives: they’d later pull one of us into an office and give us the “real story.” It was clear they didn’t trust each other very much. We invited them to a leadership offsite with the implicit goal of building intimacy. My colleague, Athena Diaconis, designed paper fortune tellers which included the 36 Questions That Lead to Love which were featured in the NY Times.
  • We were shocked at how effective this exercise was – the tears, laughter, and embraces seemed to create lasting change. They began to trust one another. They became more of a team.
  • Some information is kept private explicitly. For example, “the budget is only available to people who are vice president level or above.” Other times, information is simply inaccessible because it’s never been published in a place others have access to such as on a private storage device or as an attachment sent to only a few people.
  • Ambiguity can arise in at least two forms. One form is implicitness. It’s like when the boss says, “we need to get this report done by Friday,” and given the context it’s understood to mean, “you need to get this report done by Friday.”

    A second form of ambiguity is ephemerality: when information may be specific, but its record is fleeting and impermanent. It’s like when the boss says, “I expect you to prepare these reports from now on,” and that additional accountability cannot be weighed against others the employee may already have.
  • Within the span of a single generation, we’ve gained the ability for nearly everybody on earth to transmit large quantities of high-fidelity information to one another.
  • Presently, most IT professionals and politicians are kept up at night by what might be exposed to the public at the push of a button. These organizations and individuals can only be hurt by information leaks. Managers who grew up without a computer in every home and pocket have a very different relationship to information than younger generations. The first generation of children who fall asleep at night clutching their devices have a very different relationship to information than their parents.


  • Further, in an age where whistleblowers are venerated as heroes, defaulting to secrecy may become too great a liability. Greater transparency in the workplace may be an inevitability.
  • With all design choices there are trade-offs: the minimization of secrecy and ambiguity will come with other costs. So, if it’s not a panacea, why encourage transparency at all?
  • Let’s go deeper and explore how transparency interacts and can affect different levels of an organization.
  • The Individual: held as a value
    The Team: applied as a set of practices
    The Organization: activated as a strategy
  • At the level of an individual, transparency acts as a value.
  • This isn’t how transparency is brought into a culture.

    Activating transparency within a culture begins with each individual. Transparency is a value. People do it because they believe in it. There isn’t one correct way to be transparent. For some, it may mean feeling as though they are able to bring their whole emotional selves to the office. For others, it may mean sharing their successes and failures and making requests to get what they need.
  • In 2013, Shanock et. al published a study entitled Less acting, more doing: How surface acting relates to perceived meeting effectiveness and other employee outcomes. They demonstrated workers who believe their colleagues are acting authentically also perceive their meetings as being more effective.
  • Intuitively this makes sense: acting is exhausting.
  • Emotional honesty is only a single expression of transparency. Sharing one’s experiences and needs is another. Let’s examine the life and habits of my good friend Spencer Wright.
  • Spencer publishes a weekly newsletter, called The Prepared (from the adage, “fortune favors the prepared”). It was born out of his interest to stay current on developments in manufacturing, technology, business strategy, and product management. Along with curating articles on these topics, he also shares earnestly about his career progress, personal state of mind, and projects he’s working on. He’s near Jeffersonian in his output. At times, it hardly seems he has a thought he doesn’t write down.

    Publishing each week engaged Spencer in a feedback loop that has guided his life’s trajectory.

    In 2012, he began writing about The Public Radio, an FM radio project that he was developing with childhood friend Zach Dunham.
  • In 2013, a bicycle part — a seatmast topper optimized for 3D printing in titanium — started showing up on his blog as well. His exploration resonated with his audience. The following year he was invited to write for the 3D printing industry’s leading trade publication, the Wohlers Report. Throughout he’s received numerous speaking opportunities and job offers.
  • In 2015, he joined additive manufacturing software company nTopology. Sharing regularly led to a new career.
  • Spencer’s publishing practice could be viewed as an extreme form of an Agile stand-up meeting: he broadcasts what’s changed, what he’s about to do, and what obstacles stand in his way. Even without a closely coupled group of co-workers to help him, he has got what he’s needed to grow.
  • For a team, transparency is a set of practices.
  • Communicating clearly and openly between team members depends on one simple but fundamental practice: writing everything down. Many teams’ members are sunk by not knowing the plan, the process, the team’s roles, and resource limitations. It’s surprisingly easy to fix: open a shared document and start typing.
  • Why do we do this? So it can be changed later.
  • But what should be prioritized to be written down? We can divide these opportunities for greater transparency into two areas:

    Transparency internal to a team, with its members
    Transparency external to the team, with its stakeholders
  • A plan. Often plans are developed solitarily as heavily produced slide decks or detailed Gantt charts and presented as unchanging gospel. For work with an uncertain outcome (for example, launching a marketing campaign or designing a product) a detailed plan may not be appropriate or possible.

    A more transparent way to plan is to collaborate on defining individual objectives and working backward across three time horizons such as 2 months / 2 weeks / 2 days. Simply gather your work mates and ask them, “two months from now, what should we have completed?” Then, “two weeks from now, what will we have done to prepare us for success two months from now?” And finally, “what are our first actions to complete two days from now and who will own them?”
  • Policies and permissions. Teams of people, like any civil society, need rules to give members guidance on how to behave. Traditional enterprises often operate by an implicit master rule, “do nothing new without asking permission of a superior.” Newer, more responsive organizations often turn this policy on its head as, “act first, and we’ll legislate out what has been shown to cause us harm.” No matter which you elect, be explicit with what your team’s default policy is.

    As your team operates it will generate tensions. Colleagues will want to be included in decision making or revision cycles. Budgetary authority will need to be clarified. The antidote to resolving these tensions is to meet on a regular rhythm and record new rules in the form of policies or permissions. Conduct retrospectives on a monthly or bi-monthly cadence to revise the existing rule set.
  • Roles. Along with generating new policies for the team to operate under, working together will cause new expectations to arise. Who at the office is supposed to stock the refrigerator? Who’s supposed to pay vendors? Who is sourcing new sales opportunities? Historically teams have relied upon job titles or job descriptions to exhaustively capture a worker’s responsibilities.

    Newer, more transparent organizations clarify roles continuously — often within team retrospective meetings. August Public, an organizational transformation consultancy, continuously revises and updates their team’s policies and roles for all to see (they call this process “governance”).
  • Projects & Actions. All of the above practices concern themselves with working on the strategy and structure of the team, but how does one perform work itself with greater transparency? I recommend the action meeting format to process larger objectives into bite-sized pieces, set ownership on who’s accountable for what outcome, and see who needs help from each other. Here’s how it goes:

    Get together at the head of each week, set a brisk but firm time limit
    Share what’s changed from last week
    Bring new agenda items from the plan or from new needs
    Process these agenda items into projects with a single owner and record them in a shared document
    Get out of the meeting and get to work

    An action meeting isn’t a company all-hands meeting. If your team struggles to make it through the meeting, your team may be too large. At Parabol and in previous client work, we recommend a guideline of trying to limit team membership to no greater than 10.
  • Publishing progress & changes. As a counterpoint to the Action meeting, publishing a brief update to external stakeholders on what’s been accomplished is a simple mechanism for keeping an organization informed and giving team members a true sense of momentum. At Parabol, we call this habit a Friday Ship and publish our own progress to our broader community.
  • Sharing your team’s API. A common friction between teams are unclear rules of engagement. What is a team responsible for? How do I submit a work order? How do I request information?

    All the way back in 2002, Jeff Bezos issued a series of mandates to his organization:

    All teams will henceforth expose their data and functionality through service interfaces.

    Teams must communicate with each other through these interfaces.
    There will be no other form of inter-process communication allowed…The only communication allowed is via service interface calls over the network.

    All service interfaces, without exception, must be designed from the ground up to be externalizable. That is to say, the team must plan and design to be able to expose the interface to developers in the outside world. No exceptions.

    Bezos closed his mandate with:

    Anyone who doesn’t do this will be fired. Thank you; have a nice day!

    Excusing his authoritarian tone, the intended effect behind Bezos’s directive was to ask each team to itemize the resources they have, the services they offer, and establish clear interfaces between teams. He may have been talking about digital interfaces, but for many organizations a document or internal webpage would be effective.
    Perhaps this mandate enabled the offering of Amazon’s internal hosting infrastructure, AWS, to the public. It’s now Amazon’s single largest source of revenue.
  • At the highest level, transparency is a strategy.
  • Knowing why an organization exists and what it stands for is the first step. Digital product makers Fictive Kin created /PURPOSE to encourage organizations to explicitly publish their purpose and values at a fixed address off of their homepage.
  • More than 30 organizations have chosen to list their /purpose page so far.
  • The line for what’s considered private and privileged information is highly plastic. Perhaps no company other than Buffer illustrates how much information can be opened to the public. Emanating from their value “Default to Transparency,” they compile and update a plethora of information on their Transparency Dashboard that is still considered by most organizations too sensitive to share.

  • Buffer shares their worker’s salaries, revenue, pricing, and diversity metrics. Inside the the company, Buffer employees even share inboxes via a radical but smart email aliasing scheme. Even much of of Buffer’s software IP is available via open source on Github.

    Evaluating Buffer critically, their radical level of transparency may be a product of category competition: there is no shortage of social media management applications. In order to attract the best talent, build the best products, and win the best customers, radical transparency may be what’s required to win. Transparency as a differentiator can be observed within other competitive categories such as retail clothing at Patagonia (see: The Footprint Chronicals) or at Everlane (see: Factories) or coffee roasting at Starbucks (see: Global Responsibility Report) and Counter Culture Coffee (see: Transparency Report), among many others.

  • Publishing a platform others can use is also a form of strategic transparency. Everybody gets how AWS or the Apple App store is a “platform”. Perhaps less understood is why a company like Tesla offering its patent IP to its would-be competitors, license free, might benefit Tesla.

    On June 12th, 2014, Elon Musk published a post on the Tesla blog All Our Patent Are Belong To You. Musk claimed he did it to accelerate the EV market, the math shoed Tesla simply couldn’t build EVs fast enough to replace existing global fleet of cars. Underlying this seemingly altruistic statement may also be a bet that by accelerating the market through offering up its IP portfolio, Tesla may itself benefit in the long run. Tesla will spend around $5 billion dollars bringing its 10 million-square-foot battery-producing “gigafactory” online in its efforts to vertically integrate.

    What he really may be doing is creating new customers faster via transparency.

  • We believe greater transparency is an inevitable consequence of the internet age.

×