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School Wide Positive Behaviour Support
& Managing Severe Behaviour
Stuart McKenzie & Sven Jamvold
School Psychology Service
Key Objectives
Brief overview of School Wide Positive Behaviour
Support
To understand the “Phases of Escalating
Behaviour”...
…only in France
How were you disciplined when you were
at school?
Why this tendency to get
tougher?
Assume student is inherently bad and/or
stubborn behaviour requires much more
intensive ...
What is unhelpful with
getting tough?
Fosters environments of control
Antisocial behavior is triggered and reinforced
Shar...
VIDEO
Academic Errors Behavioural Errors
Students who achieve good work
deserve some recognition
Students should behave
appropri...
School Wide Positive Behaviour
Support
Universal Prevention:
School/Classroom-Wide Systems
for all Students, Staff, & Sett...
10
DEVELOP CLEARLY DEFINED
SCHOOL WIDE EXPECTATIONS
1.Be Respectful
1.Be Responsible
2.Be a Learner
SYSTEMS
EVIDENCE BASED
PRACTICES
DATA
OUTCOMES
River Valley Primary School Classroom ERRC Token Tally
Excellence Be
Your B...
13
14
Proserpine State School
17
Mudgeeraba State School
18
Develop a Teaching
Matrix
Create a “matrix” of expectations by
setting
Classroom Pathways
and Stairs
Bus Lines
Be Safe ...
Teaching
Matrix
SETTING
All Settings Hallways Playgrounds Cafeteria
Library/
Computer
Lab
Assembly Bus
Respect
Ourselves
B...
STATE HIGH SCHOOL TEACHING MATRIX
Expectation ROUTINE/SETTING
I am … All Settings Classroom Bus Walkways
Tuck-shop /
Cante...
CLASSROOM
RULES
22
DISPLAY EXPECTATIONS
25
PROCEDURES FOR ENCOURAGING
BEHAVIOUR
SCHOOL WIDE CONSEQUENCES
Wristband Rewards for Playground Positive Behaviour
SWPBS Evidence
International
Over 14,000 schools implementing SWPBS
http://www.pbis.org/research/default.aspx
Implementati...
Jan-July 2011
Jan-July 2010
0
20
40
60
80
100
120
140
160
180
200
Bullying
Leaving class
Major
disruption Physical
assault...
TOTAL NUMBER OF SUSPENSIONS:
2009 – 123
2010 – 40
2011 – 4 to July
32
School-wide Evaluation
Tool (SET)
“Reality Check” versus “Perceptions”
Principal Interview
Staff Interview. 10 (random)...
33
SET RESULTS
Narrogin SHS SET Features and Implementation Scores August 2009
0.0%
20.0%
50.0%
12.5%
25.0%
18.8%
100.0%
3...
Narrogin SHS SET Features and Implementation Scores
0%
25%
50%
75%
100%
1st Year
2nd Year
3rd Year
4th Year
5th Year
School Wide Positive Behaviour
Support
Individual Prevention:
Students with High Risk Behaviour
•Individualised interventi...
ROLE PLAY
Just whilst your deciding whether to
volunteer for the role play we are going to
do a quick stress test
A Quick Stress Test
Two Dolphins
I'm not sure exactly how this works,
but it is amazingly accurate. Read the
full descript...
Look at both dolphins jumping out of the
water. The dolphins are identical. A closely
monitored scientific study of a grou...
Teacher Jason
Jason, please turn in
your assignment.
What assignment?
I finished it.
I don’t have it with me
now.
You neve...
Anatomy of Escalating Behaviour Cycles
student and teacher behaviour escalate in intensity
student behaviours are followed...
Phases of Escalation
1. Calm
2. Trigger
3. Agitation
4. Acceleration
5. Peak
6. De-escalation
7. Recovery
Defining Challenging Behaviour
Definitions
Challenging behaviour can be defined as those
behaviours that threaten the safety of staff (including
self-har...
Peak
Overall the student is out of control and
exhibits his or her most severe
behaviour.
Indicators
Physical abuse or
aggression
Physical abuse
towards self
Physical abuse
towards objects
Severe tantrums,
hyperv...
•Jerry has ADHD and that’s why he’s so incorrigible
•Ed has displayed aggressive behaviours the whole time he
has been her...
Defining Behaviour
Explanatory Fictions Testable Explanations
Are not observable
Blame the student
Neglect the environm...
Which is described in
observable terms?
Hits with his fist
OR
Aggressive
Which is described in
observable terms?
Hits with his fist
OR
Aggressive
Delinquent
OR
Takes money from peers
Delinquent
OR
Takes money from peers
Psychotic
OR
Says she hears voices
Psychotic
OR
Says she hears voices
Arrives 10 minutes late
OR
Irresponsible
Arrives 10 minutes late
OR
Irresponsible
Out of seat 55% of time
OR
Hyperactive
Out of seat 55% of time
OR
Hyperactive
…only in Spain
Indicators
Able to follow
directions
Able to stay on task
Able to receive
correction
Able to set goals and
develop plans
C...
Indicators
Conflicts with other
persons
Continued
provocations
Pressure
Facing
consequences
Continued errors
Trigger
Examp...
Agitation
Overall the student exhibits an increase in
behaviour that is unfocussed.
Low Level High
Level
Indicators
Increased hand and
eye movements
Speech is intended to
cut conversations
short
Decrease in on-task
behaviour
Ea...
Competition
Count the number of times the white team
throws the basket ball, not the times that
the ball is bounced, the n...
Indicators
Questioning, arguing
provoking
Verbal abuse
Intimidation
Defiance, escape
Acceleration
Examples
 Knocks things...
…only in America
Indicators
Physical abuse or
aggression
Physical abuse
towards self
Physical abuse
towards objects
Severe tantrums,
hyperv...
…only in Mexico
Indicators
Confusion (starting,
stopping, moving)
Attempts to reconcile
Withdrawal
Denial
Blame projection
Responsive to
c...
Indicators
Willingness to resume work
(w/o interaction)
Subdued behaviour in
group work or with teacher
Denial and defensi...
…only in Africa
Most of the populace thinks it very improper to spank children, so I
have tried other methods to control our kids when the...
This is a JOKE
Identification of how to intervene early
in an escalation.
Identification of environmental factors
that can be manipulated...
"If the only tool in your toolbox is a hammer
you'll treat everything as a nail." (Abraham
Maslow)
Activity: Rotating Groups
The 7 Phases are on posters.
Each group to write their ideas about the various
strategies staff ...
Indicators
Able to follow
directions
Able to stay on task
Able to receive
correction
Able to set goals and
develop plans
C...
Up to 57% of children with language
problems have been found to have
behavioural problems and up to 86% of
children who ar...
Indicators
Conflicts with other
persons
Continued
provocations
Pressure
Facing consequences
Continued errors
Trigger
Proce...
Indicators
Increased hand and
eye movements
Speech is intended to
cut conversations
short
Decrease in on-task
behaviour
Ea...
Indicators
Questioning, arguing
provoking
Verbal abuse
Intimidation
Defiance, escape
Acceleration
Procedures
Remove all di...
Indicators
Physical abuse or
aggression
Physical abuse
towards self
Physical abuse
towards objects
Severe tantrums,
hyperv...
PART - OVERVIEW
1. PURPOSE
2. PROFESSIONALISM
3. PREPARATION
4. IDENTIFICATION
5. LEGAL MODEL
6. RESPONSE – Crisis Communi...
Is Restraint Worth it?
Indicators
Confusion (starting,
stopping, moving)
Attempts to reconcile
Withdrawal
Denial
Blame projection
Responsive to
c...
Indicators
Willingness to resume work
(w/o interaction)
Subdued behaviour in
group work or with teacher
Denial and defensi...
Let’s Look Again
Calm
Trigger
Agitation
Acceleration
Peak
De-escalation
Recovery
 
“It is always important to remember that if
you inadvertently assist the student to
escalate, do not be concerned; you w...
Big Ideas
Teach appropriate behaviour during the
Calm; escalation time is not teaching time
Watch for Agitation and interv...
…only in Australia
Phases of escalating behaviours melbourne 24 june 2011
Phases of escalating behaviours melbourne 24 june 2011
Phases of escalating behaviours melbourne 24 june 2011
Phases of escalating behaviours melbourne 24 june 2011
Phases of escalating behaviours melbourne 24 june 2011
Phases of escalating behaviours melbourne 24 june 2011
Phases of escalating behaviours melbourne 24 june 2011
Phases of escalating behaviours melbourne 24 june 2011
Phases of escalating behaviours melbourne 24 june 2011
Phases of escalating behaviours melbourne 24 june 2011
Phases of escalating behaviours melbourne 24 june 2011
Phases of escalating behaviours melbourne 24 june 2011
Phases of escalating behaviours melbourne 24 june 2011
Phases of escalating behaviours melbourne 24 june 2011
Phases of escalating behaviours melbourne 24 june 2011
Phases of escalating behaviours melbourne 24 june 2011
Phases of escalating behaviours melbourne 24 june 2011
Phases of escalating behaviours melbourne 24 june 2011
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Phases of escalating behaviours melbourne 24 june 2011

  1. 1. School Wide Positive Behaviour Support & Managing Severe Behaviour Stuart McKenzie & Sven Jamvold School Psychology Service
  2. 2. Key Objectives Brief overview of School Wide Positive Behaviour Support To understand the “Phases of Escalating Behaviour” model and be able to apply this model to profile students with severe challenging behaviour To enhance the development and implementation of effective intervention strategies for students with severe challenging behaviour
  3. 3. …only in France
  4. 4. How were you disciplined when you were at school?
  5. 5. Why this tendency to get tougher? Assume student is inherently bad and/or stubborn behaviour requires much more intensive consequences Assume student must ‘learn’ to take responsibility for their own behaviour and prove they deserve to be in class Assume aversive consequences teach students to behave We get temporary relief
  6. 6. What is unhelpful with getting tough? Fosters environments of control Antisocial behavior is triggered and reinforced Shared accountability is shifted away from school and to the student/family/community Child-adult relationship are devalued and put at risk Link between academic programming and social behavior is weakened Research does not support effectiveness
  7. 7. VIDEO
  8. 8. Academic Errors Behavioural Errors Students who achieve good work deserve some recognition Students should behave appropriately without needing recognition Students are trying to make the correct response Students are trying to be disruptive - that is, to make an incorrect response Errors are accidental Errors are deliberate Errors are inevitable Students are refusing to cooperate Learning requires exploration Students should not explore limits; they should obey them Students who are having difficulties need additional or modified teaching Students who are having difficulties should be punished
  9. 9. School Wide Positive Behaviour Support Universal Prevention: School/Classroom-Wide Systems for all Students, Staff, & Settings • 3-5 Positively stated rules •Behaviour Matrix – schoolwide behaviour expectations. •Lesson plans to teach behaviour expectations •Procedures for encouraging expected behaviour •Procedures for discouraging rule violations •Data collection, evaluation and monitoring. Other SW Programs Tribes Friendly Schools & Families Restorative Justice Values etc
  10. 10. 10 DEVELOP CLEARLY DEFINED SCHOOL WIDE EXPECTATIONS 1.Be Respectful 1.Be Responsible 2.Be a Learner
  11. 11. SYSTEMS EVIDENCE BASED PRACTICES DATA OUTCOMES River Valley Primary School Classroom ERRC Token Tally Excellence Be Your Best Responsibility Respect Care Fred Tim Jack Joe
  12. 12. 13
  13. 13. 14
  14. 14. Proserpine State School
  15. 15. 17 Mudgeeraba State School
  16. 16. 18 Develop a Teaching Matrix Create a “matrix” of expectations by setting Classroom Pathways and Stairs Bus Lines Be Safe Get adult help for accidents and spills Keep to the left Walk Face forward On signal, line up, one arm-length apart
  17. 17. Teaching Matrix SETTING All Settings Hallways Playgrounds Cafeteria Library/ Computer Lab Assembly Bus Respect Ourselves Be on task. Give your best effort. Be prepared. Walk. Have a plan. Eat all your food. Select healthy foods. Study, read, compute. Sit in one spot. Watch for your stop. Respect Others Be kind. Hands/feet to self. Help/share with others. Use normal voice volume. Walk to right. Play safe. Include others. Share equipment. Practice good table manners Whisper. Return books. Listen/watch. Use appropriate applause. Use a quiet voice. Stay in your seat. Respect Property Recycle. Clean up after self. Pick up litter. Maintain physical space. Use equipment properly. Put litter in garbage can. Replace trays & utensils. Clean up eating area. Push in chairs. Treat books carefully. Pick up. Treat chairs appropriately. Wipe your feet. Sit appropriately. Expectations 1. SW Expectations 2. NATURAL CONTEXT 3. BEHAVIOR EXAMPLES
  18. 18. STATE HIGH SCHOOL TEACHING MATRIX Expectation ROUTINE/SETTING I am … All Settings Classroom Bus Walkways Tuck-shop / Canteen Oval HPE Playground UniversalExpectations Safe Show self control Report any problems Gain permission to leave and to be in any setting Keep body to self. Follow directions. Use equipment carefully Keep bodies calm Wait in designated area Keep all of your body inside the bus. Keep bodies calm Walk Keep left Keep bodies calm Wait patiently Walk Place rubbish in bins Keep bodies calm Use equipment for intended purpose. Participate in school approved games only. Use equipment for intended purpose. Participate in school approved games only. Respectful Be tolerant of others Accept individual differences Care for self, others and the environment Use polite language Respect others right to learn. Older students to look out for little ones Show driver respect. Walk quietly so others can continue learning Eat only your food. Listen to / for instructions Play fair – show good sportsmanship Play fair – show good sportsmanship a Learner Be on task. Do your best. Manage your time. Be prepared. Challenge yourself. Listen actively Follow instructions Do your best Be on time for next class Return to class promptly Eat healthily. Manage your money. Learn new games and activities. Learn new games and activities.
  19. 19. CLASSROOM RULES
  20. 20. 22 DISPLAY EXPECTATIONS
  21. 21. 25 PROCEDURES FOR ENCOURAGING BEHAVIOUR SCHOOL WIDE CONSEQUENCES
  22. 22. Wristband Rewards for Playground Positive Behaviour
  23. 23. SWPBS Evidence International Over 14,000 schools implementing SWPBS http://www.pbis.org/research/default.aspx Implementation of SWPBS related to: Reduction in office discipline referrals Reduction in suspensions, and Improved academic performance
  24. 24. Jan-July 2011 Jan-July 2010 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 180 200 Bullying Leaving class Major disruption Physical assault Refusal Throwing Verbal assault Outof area EDPSsummaryby Behaviour Comparisonof 2010 and 2011 datauntil 6 July2011 Jan-July 2011 Jan-July 2010
  25. 25. TOTAL NUMBER OF SUSPENSIONS: 2009 – 123 2010 – 40 2011 – 4 to July
  26. 26. 32 School-wide Evaluation Tool (SET) “Reality Check” versus “Perceptions” Principal Interview Staff Interview. 10 (random) Student Interview. 15 (random) Asks key questions relating to school expectations/ rules from BMIS policy. Use the language of the school.
  27. 27. 33 SET RESULTS Narrogin SHS SET Features and Implementation Scores August 2009 0.0% 20.0% 50.0% 12.5% 25.0% 18.8% 100.0% 32.3% 0% 25% 50% 75% 100% ExpectationsDefined ExpectationsTaught RewardSystem ViolationsSystem DecisionMaking Management DistrictSupport ImplementationAverage PercentImplemented
  28. 28. Narrogin SHS SET Features and Implementation Scores 0% 25% 50% 75% 100% 1st Year 2nd Year 3rd Year 4th Year 5th Year
  29. 29. School Wide Positive Behaviour Support Individual Prevention: Students with High Risk Behaviour •Individualised intervention •Functional behaviour assessment •Escalation Profiles •Intensive support services Universal Prevention: School/Classroom-Wide Systems for all Students, Staff, & Settings • 3-5 Positively stated rules •Behaviour Matrix – schoolwide behaviour expectations. •Lesson plans to teach behaviour expectations •Procedures for encouraging expected behaviour •Procedures for discouraging rule violations •Data collection, evaluation and monitoring. Other SW Programs Tribes Friendly Schools & Families Restorative Justice Values etc Targetted Prevention: Targeted Interventions Systems for Students with at-Risk Behaviour •Behaviour Education Programs •Admin– Office Check/Connect/Expect HUG –Hello/Update/Goodbye Mentor Program
  30. 30. ROLE PLAY Just whilst your deciding whether to volunteer for the role play we are going to do a quick stress test
  31. 31. A Quick Stress Test Two Dolphins I'm not sure exactly how this works, but it is amazingly accurate. Read the full description before looking at the picture. The picture below has 2 identical dolphins in it. It was used in a case study as a measure of stress levels at Loma Linda Medical Centre.
  32. 32. Look at both dolphins jumping out of the water. The dolphins are identical. A closely monitored scientific study of a group revealed that in spite of the fact that the dolphins are identical, a person under stress would find differences in the two dolphins. If there are many differences found between both dolphins, it means the person is experiencing a great amount of stress. Look at the photograph and if you find more than one or two differences you may want to take a vacation.
  33. 33. Teacher Jason Jason, please turn in your assignment. What assignment? I finished it. I don’t have it with me now. You never believe me. F_____ you! Pulls away, glares, & raises fist as if to strike. The assignment you didn’t finish during class. Great, please turn it in now. You have a choice: turn it in or do it again. I guess you’ve made the choice to do it again. That’s disrespect…go to the office. Moves closer…& puts hand on J. shoulder. Make me.
  34. 34. Anatomy of Escalating Behaviour Cycles student and teacher behaviour escalate in intensity student behaviours are followed by a consequence that becomes the antecedent for the next student behaviour as consequences become more severe, student behaviours become more intense “Stress arouses feelings, feelings trigger behaviour. Behaviour incites others. Others increase stress. And around it goes” Wood and Long 1991
  35. 35. Phases of Escalation 1. Calm 2. Trigger 3. Agitation 4. Acceleration 5. Peak 6. De-escalation 7. Recovery
  36. 36. Defining Challenging Behaviour
  37. 37. Definitions Challenging behaviour can be defined as those behaviours that threaten the safety of staff (including self-harming behaviours) or those disruptive behaviours that are ongoing in nature, and are not modified using whole class/ generic behaviour management strategies. Disruptive behaviour can be defined as those behaviours that hinder or stop a teacher from teaching, or hinder or stop students from learning.
  38. 38. Peak Overall the student is out of control and exhibits his or her most severe behaviour.
  39. 39. Indicators Physical abuse or aggression Physical abuse towards self Physical abuse towards objects Severe tantrums, hyperventilation Peak Example  Hits other children  Destroys work  Screams, kicks, scratches, bites  Head butts floor and walls
  40. 40. •Jerry has ADHD and that’s why he’s so incorrigible •Ed has displayed aggressive behaviours the whole time he has been here •Steven is like that because he is emotionally disturbed •Donna is so unpredictable I think she is psychotic or schizo or something •Stephen pushes and hits other students when he loses a game •When given one question at a time, Sarah completes all her maths •When asked to repeat or correct a task, Jessica talks back to the teacher and throws her work on the floor. •Geoff engages in appropriate conversations with staff when in one-to- one situations.
  41. 41. Defining Behaviour Explanatory Fictions Testable Explanations Are not observable Blame the student Neglect the environment Are subjective Don’t lead to interventions Are observable Can be manipulated Are environmentally focussed Are objective Lead to interventions Observing actual behaviour is different from inferring or making judgements about the student on the basis of behaviour Labels stigmatise and are not helpful in managing behaviour.
  42. 42. Which is described in observable terms? Hits with his fist OR Aggressive
  43. 43. Which is described in observable terms? Hits with his fist OR Aggressive
  44. 44. Delinquent OR Takes money from peers
  45. 45. Delinquent OR Takes money from peers
  46. 46. Psychotic OR Says she hears voices
  47. 47. Psychotic OR Says she hears voices
  48. 48. Arrives 10 minutes late OR Irresponsible
  49. 49. Arrives 10 minutes late OR Irresponsible
  50. 50. Out of seat 55% of time OR Hyperactive
  51. 51. Out of seat 55% of time OR Hyperactive
  52. 52. …only in Spain
  53. 53. Indicators Able to follow directions Able to stay on task Able to receive correction Able to set goals and develop plans Calm Example  Compliant  Will sit for up to 10 minutes  Likes playing with the paints, trolley etc  Follows instructions  Completes activities (modified)  She still requires 1:1 to achieve outcomes  Mingles with Peers
  54. 54. Indicators Conflicts with other persons Continued provocations Pressure Facing consequences Continued errors Trigger Example  Morning transition “separating from grandparents”  When she has completed an activity  Transition time  Re-engaging with a new task  Peers involving themselves in her activity without asking  After recess  When tired  The word “No”
  55. 55. Agitation Overall the student exhibits an increase in behaviour that is unfocussed. Low Level High Level
  56. 56. Indicators Increased hand and eye movements Speech is intended to cut conversations short Decrease in on-task behaviour Easily distracted from work Agitation Example  Gets restless  Says “No”  Pushes her work away  Knocks things off table  Gets “that’ look, she shows her teeth  Tenses right up  Says “don’t look at me”  Doesn’t want you to come near her
  57. 57. Competition Count the number of times the white team throws the basket ball, not the times that the ball is bounced, the number of times the ball is passed from one member of the white team to the another Video
  58. 58. Indicators Questioning, arguing provoking Verbal abuse Intimidation Defiance, escape Acceleration Examples  Knocks things off tables  Lies on the floor kicking her legs around  Will attempt to destroy things, rips work  Pulls posters off wall, rips up  She will bang her head on the floor/walls  Her behaviour is such that it necessitates physical intervention  Whips herself up into a peak state ‘frenzy’
  59. 59. …only in America
  60. 60. Indicators Physical abuse or aggression Physical abuse towards self Physical abuse towards objects Severe tantrums, hyperventilation Peak
  61. 61. …only in Mexico
  62. 62. Indicators Confusion (starting, stopping, moving) Attempts to reconcile Withdrawal Denial Blame projection Responsive to concrete directions De-escalation Examples  Stops thrashing about  Begins to settles down  Gets very hot, red in the face. Says ‘I feel crook’  Says “Don’t look at me”  Pushes you away
  63. 63. Indicators Willingness to resume work (w/o interaction) Subdued behaviour in group work or with teacher Denial and defensive regarding the out of control behaviour Reluctance to enter into discussions about the out of control behaviour Recovery Examples  Comes back to herself  Stands up, moves forward to watch class  Re –engages with conversation that she initiates  Wants to re-engage with group.  Recovers very quickly but takes a long time to return to a state of Calm.
  64. 64. …only in Africa
  65. 65. Most of the populace thinks it very improper to spank children, so I have tried other methods to control our kids when they have one of "those moments". One that I found very effective is for me to just take the child for a Car ride and talk. They usually calm down and stop misbehaving after our little car ride together. I've included the photo below of one of my sessions, with our son, in Car so you can see if you might like to use the technique. Its very effective
  66. 66. This is a JOKE
  67. 67. Identification of how to intervene early in an escalation. Identification of environmental factors that can be manipulated. Identification of replacement behaviours that can be taught (& serve same function as problem). Intervention Procedures
  68. 68. "If the only tool in your toolbox is a hammer you'll treat everything as a nail." (Abraham Maslow)
  69. 69. Activity: Rotating Groups The 7 Phases are on posters. Each group to write their ideas about the various strategies staff could use at each phase of escalation. Groups will have 2 minutes to write at each phase. Groups will then rotate. Whole Group feedback
  70. 70. Indicators Able to follow directions Able to stay on task Able to receive correction Able to set goals and develop plans Calm Procedures Arrange for high rates of academic and social success Use positive reinforcement Teach critical skills Communicate high expectations Teach problem solving
  71. 71. Up to 57% of children with language problems have been found to have behavioural problems and up to 86% of children who are behaviourally disturbed have language problems, particularly in the area of pragmatics (Benner, G. J., Nelson, J. R., & Epstein, M. H., 2002).
  72. 72. Indicators Conflicts with other persons Continued provocations Pressure Facing consequences Continued errors Trigger Procedures Significantly modify or eliminate problems routines Make structural or environmental modifications Identify and pre-correct for known triggers, reinforce success Prompt what has been taught
  73. 73. Indicators Increased hand and eye movements Speech is intended to cut conversations short Decrease in on-task behaviour Easily distracted from work Agitation Procedures Move in and assist or give space/ t/up time Modify task and/or expectations Involve in successful activities Positive Removal
  74. 74. Indicators Questioning, arguing provoking Verbal abuse Intimidation Defiance, escape Acceleration Procedures Remove all distracting / competing environmental factors Follow crisis management procedures Establish and follow through with bottom line Detach from student Escalation and self-control are negatively related Escalation is likely to run its course
  75. 75. Indicators Physical abuse or aggression Physical abuse towards self Physical abuse towards objects Severe tantrums, hyperventilation Peak Procedures Focus on safety / minimize the peak Continue Acceleration phase procedures Room clear Restraint
  76. 76. PART - OVERVIEW 1. PURPOSE 2. PROFESSIONALISM 3. PREPARATION 4. IDENTIFICATION 5. LEGAL MODEL 6. RESPONSE – Crisis Communication 7. RESPONSE - Evasion 8. RESPONSE - Restraint 9. RECORDING 10 DEBRIEFING, EVALUATION, FEEDBACK
  77. 77. Is Restraint Worth it?
  78. 78. Indicators Confusion (starting, stopping, moving) Attempts to reconcile Withdrawal Denial Blame projection Responsive to concrete directions De-escalation Procedures Focus on removing excess confrontation Don’t consequence Avoid confrontation Don’t force return Emphasize starting over
  79. 79. Indicators Willingness to resume work (w/o interaction) Subdued behaviour in group work or with teacher Denial and defensive regarding the out of control behaviour Reluctance to enter into discussions about the out of control behaviour Recovery Procedures Follow through with consequences for problem behaviour (or wait till calm) Reinforce displays of appropriate behaviour Debrief Facilitate transition Debrief after consequence Goal to increase more appropriate behaviour
  80. 80. Let’s Look Again Calm Trigger Agitation Acceleration Peak De-escalation Recovery
  81. 81.   “It is always important to remember that if you inadvertently assist the student to escalate, do not be concerned; you will get another chance to do it right the next time around.” Geoff Colvin (2004)
  82. 82. Big Ideas Teach appropriate behaviour during the Calm; escalation time is not teaching time Watch for Agitation and intervene Minimize the Peak and focus on safety Avoid confrontation in De-escalation Debrief and follow-through during Recovery Proforma
  83. 83. …only in Australia
  • CelynnChang

    Mar. 16, 2021
  • TrishBalloch

    Feb. 22, 2020

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