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A 5-Step Guide to Social Media for the Entertainment Industry

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A 5-Step Guide to Social Media for the Entertainment Industry

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A 5-Step Guide to Social Media for the Entertainment Industry

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A 5-Step Guide to Social Media for the Entertainment Industry

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Hinweis der Redaktion

  • Treat social media like you would any other marketing campaign at the planning stages.

    You need to have clear objectives, you need to know who you’re trying to reach, you need a budget (time and money), and you need to understand what the tools can do for you.
  • Let’s start with demographics. The big picture painted by these numbers is that the demographic distribution across both mainstream and emerging channels really is what you would intuitively figure. Maybe even more pronounced.
  • Now let’s focus on mobile. When you compare total time to frequency of use, you see a lot of the same players, but in different orders.

    This frequency list really surprised me. The reason you see some unfamiliar apps is that this is a global list, and there are a lot of big markets in the world (China for instance) where people are reaching for their phones more frequently than Americans do.

    So what’s your WeChat strategy? Line?

    The big takeaway from this slide is that Facebook is still the dominant player.
  • What are the shared attributes of the fastest-growing apps? They are multi-use content and chat platforms.

    People use them both for basic communication (1:1 or 1:many) and to share and discover content.

    Think of these as future traffic drivers. (Except for Instagram—no one has figured out how to efficiently drive traffic from Instagram.)
  • With most audiences, when I talk about social video, people get nervous. Video is HARD! But you guys are a little different. Video is your strength, so you should be encouraged by these stats.

    Traffic

    Hours

    Years

    Snapchat! (This is actually an old stat, I think. They might be at 7 billion now.)
  • How many of you have heard about the big Facebook vs. Google showdown that happened throughout 2015?

    By some measures, Facebook actually overtook YouTube in video views. That number is a bit suspect, though. Facebook counts at 3 seconds, where YouTube counts at 30.
  • More than half of Facebook’s video views are mobile. (Zuckerberg story.)

    YouTube sessions are way longer than you would think.

    It’s not just kids who watch long-form content on their phones; it’s everyone.
  • How many of you use Snapchat? How many use it every day?

    This audience probably doesn’t need to be told to take Snapchat seriously, but there’s still a lot of skepticism out there. If you are a Snapchat skeptic, the numbers should convince you. It’s rapidly catching up to Facebook and YouTube in video views.
  • I’ve finished each of the steps with a slide on more detailed, tactical advice. You all have a pdf of the deck, so these might work better as takeaway notes, but I’ll cover them briefly here.
  • How many of you have crowdfunded projects before? How many would call it a success?

    Crowdfunding opens some really interesting opportunities for independent artists—I don’t need to tell you guys that.

    This is Sundance! Indiegogo launched here in 2008.

    But the thing about crowdfunding is that YOU NEED A CROWD!

    Treat your Kickstarter or Indiegogo page like a landing page. You have to build your audience somewhere else, then drive to the page.
  • I feel like I should have crowd-sourced better image ideas for this slide!

    For creative people who really use social well, the dinner party analogy makes sense. And Twitter is where it happens.
  • This is kind of polyanna, but I really think it’s true.

    I hope he actually said it. Mark Twain, Winston Churchill, and Plato are up there.
  • Have you guys heard of Tugg? There are other similar platforms out there.

    Was Lazer Team a festival film? Not sure. Last year, I think it was Me and Earl and the Dying Girl and Lazer Team who came out on top!

    Seriously, though, if you want to do something totally different and you want to demonstrate demand, you can build you niche audience on social and drive them to a platform like this.
  • They got a big earned media boost in Canada for the project. I’m not sure how scaleable it is, but it’s an interesting concept.
  • People love to peek behind the curtain.

    It doesn’t have to be Jon Favreau Instagramming Scarlett Johansen. But if you do happen to have a candid backstage moment with Scarlett, I would recommend Instagramming it.
  • This slide speaks to the two-way nature of social media.

    It’s not just about your relationship with your fans; it’s about their relationship with each other as well.
  • How many of you have ever hosted a Twitter chat?

    I’ll admit, this one is kind of an advanced tactic. It takes some social media dexterity.

    But it can go a long way toward creating real community around your projects.
  • I’ll admit , I had to Google “best filmmakers on Snapchat.” So I found this guy. He might be better described as “best Snapchatter who also makes films.”

    The only person in the entertainment industry I follow is DJ Khaled. He’s a talented artists, but I’m not sure what you guys can learn from him.

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