Diese Präsentation wurde erfolgreich gemeldet.
Wir verwenden Ihre LinkedIn Profilangaben und Informationen zu Ihren Aktivitäten, um Anzeigen zu personalisieren und Ihnen relevantere Inhalte anzuzeigen. Sie können Ihre Anzeigeneinstellungen jederzeit ändern.

Revving up writing instruction

521 Aufrufe

Veröffentlicht am

Revving up writing instruction

Veröffentlicht in: Bildung
  • What Every Man Is Obsessed Over, But Will Never Tell You. Click Here  http://scamcb.com/hissecret/pdf
       Antworten 
    Sind Sie sicher, dass Sie …  Ja  Nein
    Ihre Nachricht erscheint hier
  • Get access to 16,000 woodworking plans, Download 50 FREE Plans... ♣♣♣ http://ishbv.com/tedsplans/pdf
       Antworten 
    Sind Sie sicher, dass Sie …  Ja  Nein
    Ihre Nachricht erscheint hier
  • There are over 16,000 woodworking plans that comes with step-by-step instructions and detailed photos, Click here to take a look ♣♣♣ http://tinyurl.com/yy9yh8fu
       Antworten 
    Sind Sie sicher, dass Sie …  Ja  Nein
    Ihre Nachricht erscheint hier
  • Gehören Sie zu den Ersten, denen das gefällt!

Revving up writing instruction

  1. 1. Revving Up Writing Instruction August 18, 2016 Honor Moorman honor.moorman@gmail.com tiny.cc/japhetwriting
  2. 2. Reflecting on Personal Experiences As a student . . . Memorable Moments Learning to Write Write about a time in elementary school when you felt really good about your writing, when you felt successful or proud of your writing. OR Write about a time in elementary school when you felt frustrated or unsuccessful as a writer. • What made you feel that way? • If you could go back in time and give yourself some writing advice, what would you say to your childhood self?
  3. 3. Reflecting on Personal Experiences As a teacher . . . Current Successes and Challenges Write about some of your recent successes with writing instruction. AND Write about some of your recent challenges with writing instruction.
  4. 4. Think-Write-Pair-Share • Turn and talk with a partner about your successes and challenges • Join another pair to form a group of four; share what you’ve been talking about and listen for patterns and similarities • Share out to the whole group
  5. 5. What does effective writing instruction look like?
  6. 6. “Teaching Elementary Students to Be Effective Writers” Four Research-Based Recommendations: 1. Provide daily time for students to write. 2. Teach students to use the writing process for a variety of purposes. 2a. Teach students the writing process. 2b. Teach students to write for a variety of purposes. 3. Teach students to become fluent with handwriting, spelling, sentence construction, typing, and word processing 4. Create an engaged community of writers.
  7. 7. Carousel Brainstorming
  8. 8. Carousel Brainstorming Describing Effective Writing Instruction • What does this look like? Sound like? • What is the teacher doing? • What are the students doing?
  9. 9. Gallery Walk
  10. 10. 1. Provide daily time for students to write. To become effective writers, students need daily opportunities to learn and practice writing skills, strategies, and techniques. Writing practice can also be integrated across the content areas to provide students with additional time to write. • Think-Write-Pair-Share • Carousel Brainstorming
  11. 11. 2a. Teach students the writing process. • Teach students strategies for the various components of the writing process. • Gradually release writing responsibility from the teacher to the student. • Guide students to select and use appropriate writing strategies. • Encourage students to be flexible in their use of the components of the writing process.
  12. 12. 2b. Teach students to write for a variety of purposes. • Help students understand the different purposes of writing. • Expand students’ concept of audience. • Teach students to emulate the features of good writing. • Teach students techniques for writing effectively for different purposes.
  13. 13. 3. Teach students to become fluent with handwriting, spelling, sentence construction, typing, and word processing. (We’ll come back to this one.)
  14. 14. 4. Create an engaged community of writers. • Teachers should participate as members of the community by writing and sharing their writing. • Give students writing choices. • Encourage students to collaborate as writers. • Provide students with opportunities to give and receive feedback throughout the writing process. • Publish students’ writing, and extend the community beyond the classroom.
  15. 15. The Writing Workshop Model
  16. 16. Unpacking the STAAR Writing Expectations Assessed Curriculum (Grade 4 pp. 5-8; Grade 7 pp. 9-13) Previous Expository Writing Prompts (p. 14) Expository Writing Rubrics (pp. 15-16) • What do you notice? • What questions do you have? • What are the implications for writing instruction at your grade level?
  17. 17. Break Please be ready to start in 15 minutes.
  18. 18. The Writing Workshop Model and The Six Traits of Writing
  19. 19. The Traits and the Writing Process • Prewriting Ideas, Organization, Voice • Drafting Ideas, Organization, Voice, Word Choice, Sentence Fluency • Revising All traits except conventions • Editing Conventions • Publishing Presentation
  20. 20. Why Six Traits? • Provides consistent language for talking about writing • Keeps assessment honest; saves assessment time • Makes writing and revision manageable (small steps) • Supports the writing process • Gives direction to revision and editing • Empowers students; increases motivation • Encourages thinking skills • Links reading and writing • It’s real
  21. 21. Getting Started with Writing Workshop • Notebooks • Procedures • Seed ideas • Status of the class • Reading/writing connections • Peer conferencing space • Author’s chair
  22. 22. Teaching the Trait of Ideas
  23. 23. Definition of Ideas Ideas are the heart of any piece of writing. Ideas are all about information. In a good creative piece, ideas paint pictures in a reader’s mind. In an informational piece, strong ideas make text reader-friendly. Two things make ideas work well: clarity and details. Good writing always makes sense. And it includes details—not just any old details, mind you, but those beyond-the- obvious bits of information that thoughtful, observant writers notice.
  24. 24. Characteristics of Ideas • This paper is clear and focused. • The topic is narrow and manageable. • Relevant, telling, quality details go beyond the obvious. • Reader’s questions are anticipated and answered.
  25. 25. What does a writer do when his/her ideas are strong? • Selects an idea (the topic) • Narrows the idea (focus) • Elaborates the idea (development) • Discovers the BEST information to convey the main idea (details)
  26. 26. Student-Friendly Checklist: Ideas • It all makes sense. • I know this topic well. • I have included the most interesting details. • My writing has a purpose. • Once you start reading, you will not want to stop.
  27. 27. Prewriting: Listing • What kinds of lists do people make? • Why do we make lists? Prompt: Write about your favorite place. Explain what makes this place special.
  28. 28. Make a list of favorite places
  29. 29. Prewriting: Blueprinting • Choose one place from your list. • Create a blueprint of this place. • Label the different rooms/areas. • Add details and notes to your drawing.
  30. 30. Prewriting: Ideas • Listing • Blueprinting • Draw, Label, Caption • Turn and Talk • Freewrite • Across the Content Areas: – KWL – Everything I know about . . . – Write Around
  31. 31. More Prewriting for Expository Prompts Write about your favorite . Explain what makes this special. • food • book • holiday Explain what makes a good/the perfect . • teacher • sandwich • Saturday
  32. 32. More Prewriting for Expository Prompts Explain why it is important to . • be kind to others • be a good friend • learn to read Explain how to survive . • hot Texas summers • moving to a new school • losing your favorite toy
  33. 33. Freewrite Write about your favorite place. What makes this place special?
  34. 34. Rules for Freewriting • Keep writing the whole time. • Don’t erase or cross out; just keep writing. • If you get stuck, rewrite the last few words over and over until you start writing something else. • If you finish telling about one idea, just choose another idea to explore and keep writing!
  35. 35. Elaborating on Ideas • Ask Me a Question – In groups of three, students take turns reading their writing aloud to the group. – The listeners do not comment. Instead, they write down three questions they have (things they want to know more about) and give them to the writer. – This helps the writer become more aware of details he or she might want to add during revision.
  36. 36. Drafting: Sentence Modeling for Ideas
  37. 37. Drafting: Sentence Modeling for Ideas In a group, pick an person, describe this person, and write a page for a book about our class. The important thing about Gayle is that she is kind. She is good at drawing pictures and she is funny, and smart, and she helps others learn and listens to what we say. But the important thing about Gayle is that she is kind.
  38. 38. Drafting: Sentence Modeling for Ideas 1. The important thing about _________ is that she/he is _________. 2. She/he is ______________, and she/he is _____________, and ___________, and she/he is _____________, and she/ he is _____________________. 3. But the important thing about _____________ is that she/he is ________.
  39. 39. Now Apply the Mentor Text Structure to Your Own Writing 1. The important thing about __(my favorite place)___ is that it is _________. 2. It is/was/has ______________, and it is/was/has _____________, and ___________, and it is/was/has _____________, and it is/was/has _____________________. 3. But the important thing about ___(my favorite place)____ is that it is ________.
  40. 40. Building Blocks for More Interesting Sentences • When • Size or color • Place • Name Teacher modeling: The dog howled. Whole class practice: The wind whistled. Pairs practice: The man stumbled. The car lurched.
  41. 41. More Ways to Teach Ideas Reporter’s Questions • Who • What • When • Where • Why • How Sensory Details • What color is it? • Does it make a sound? • What does it smell like? • Does it have a taste? • What do you do with it? • Can you compare it to anything? • Who uses it?
  42. 42. Teaching the Trait of Organization
  43. 43. Definition of Organization Organization is the internal structure of the piece. Once a writer has assembled his/her information and thoughts, it’s time to put things together in a way that makes sense and that holds the reader’s attention. The writer must ask, Where do I begin? What do I say next? And after that? How do I wrap it all up? Good organization makes writing as easy to follow as a well-laid-out road map. The reader moves effortlessly from one thought to the next, and his/her interest and understanding grow throughout the piece until—boom! The power of a just-right conclusion brings the discussion to a close...for now.
  44. 44. Characteristics of Organization • An inviting introduction draws the reader in. • The conclusion provides a sense of closure and resolution. • Sequencing is logical and effective. • Pacing is well controlled.
  45. 45. Organization: Questions for Writers • How does my paper begin? • Do I have a strong beginning? • Did I tell things in order? • What is the most important thing I have to say? • Does everything link to my message? • How does my paper end? • Do I have a strong ending?
  46. 46. Student-Friendly Checklist: Organization • My beginning will interest the reader! • Everything ties together. • It builds to the good parts. • You can follow it easily. • At the end it feels finished and makes you think.
  47. 47. My favorite place: my mobile home When I was in 2nd, 3rd, and 4th grade, I lived in a mobile home with my mom. She had a bedroom at one end and my room was at the other end. My uncle built us a red porch. I used to play house under sheets draped across chairs in the living room. I used to sit up in the tree outside and read Nancy Drew books. One time I got stung by a bee. My mom read to me every night. I used to climb in bed with her early in the morning. I waited by the door for my dad to pick me up on the weekends.
  48. 48. Revising for Organization • What order works best for my information? • Is there information I need to add? • Is there information I should delete?
  49. 49. Strategies for Organization • Group like ideas together • Spatial • Chronological • Compare/contrast • Question/answer • Point/counterpoint • Order of importance • 2-3-1 order (most interesting)
  50. 50. Ways to Begin • Make a bold statement • Raise an important question • Start with something happening • Open with a quotation • Give a brief anecdote • Share a little-known fact • Set the scene with vivid description • Tell something you believe • Let the reader in on a secret
  51. 51. Sorting Leads • Collect examples of each type of lead from children’s books (familiar to students if possible) • Create manipulatives with category headings and example leads • Have students sort the examples into the appropriate categories
  52. 52. Partner Practice: Ways to Begin 1. With your partner, choose a topic: What I love/hate about . . . 2. Try at least 3 different leads  3. Share with another pair and talk about which lead works best and why • Bold or surprising statement • Definition • Short personal experience • Opinion • Question
  53. 53. Lunch Please be ready to start at 12:30.
  54. 54. Teaching the Trait of Voice
  55. 55. Definition of Voice Voice is many things: individuality, perspective, expressiveness, sensitivity to audience, enthusiasm for a topic, confidence – and so much more. Voice has the power to hold a reader’s attention and to make the reading more enjoyable. It also reveals something of the writer, and the stronger the voice, the deeper the revelation. Even informational pieces can (and should) have strong voice, the kind of voice that resonates from a writer’s knowledge of and respect for his/her topic, along with the desire to bring that topic to life for the reader.
  56. 56. Characteristics of Voice • The reader feels a strong interaction with the writer. • The writer takes a risk. • The flavor is appropriate for the audience and purpose. • The personality of the writer comes through.
  57. 57. When the Voice is Strong . . . • Is there more? Bring it on! • You feel a connection to this writer. • This is a piece you’d share aloud with others. • Voice matches purpose and audience. • The writing is lively and engaging – it gets you to respond.
  58. 58. Student-Friendly Checklist: Voice • This really sounds like me! • I’ve been honest and written what I think and feel. • Can you fell my commitment to this topic? • I want you to experience my writing with me. • I know why I’m writing and who my audience is. • I bet you’ll want to read this to someone.
  59. 59. Describe each of the following from two different perspectives: 1. a sizzling, rare steak A. vegetarian B. hungry meat-lover 2. a five year old’s birthday party A. a five-year old guest B. the frazzled mother who is hosting the party 3. a big, strange dog in your yard A. a dog lover B. someone who is afraid of dogs 4. a teenager with multiple piercings A. a teenager who admires the “artwork” B. a conservative grandparent
  60. 60. Revising for Voice • Describe your favorite place from someone else’s point of view • Go back to your draft and make changes to be sure every sentence sounds uniquely like you
  61. 61. Voice in Content Area Writing Write Like a Pro (scientist, historian, mathematician) New Voices, New Choices Write the first sentence of a letter (on the same topic) for five different audiences. RAFT • Role of the writer • Audience for the piece of writing • Format of the material • Topic or subject
  62. 62. Teaching the Trait of Word Choice
  63. 63. Definition of Word Choice In good writing, the word choice is clear, precise and colorful. It is marked by a thoughtful selection of the “just right” word that conveys both the meaning and the attitude the writer wishes to project. Good writers learn to spend words like money, making each one count. They also learn that strong verbs give writing energy, while truckloads of adjectives and adverbs do little more than weigh the text down. Strong word choice is free of ponderous, heavy language, written only to impress. It is also free of fluffy language: nice, fun, wonderful, great. It is clean, clear and to the point—sometimes quotable.
  64. 64. Characteristics of Word Choice • Words are specific and accurate. • Lively verbs, specific nouns and modifiers. • Language enhances and clarifies meaning. • Carefully chosen words create pictures in the reader’s mind.
  65. 65. When the Word Choice is Strong . . . • Verbs breathe life and energy into the writing. • Words are not only correct, but precise – just right! • The language suits the topic. • The writer is in control – the language is natural, not forced. • Original phrasing keeps you tuned in (and makes you wish you’d thought of it yourself).
  66. 66. Student-Friendly Checklist: Word Choice • This is the best way to say this. • My words create mind pictures! • I’ve tried new ways to say everyday things. • Listen to the power in my verbs. • Some of the words and phrases linger in my mind.
  67. 67. Spectrum of Meaning • Brainstorm other words for “small” or “large” (just choose 1) • Write each word on a separate sticky note • Place the words in order from largest to smallest
  68. 68. Partner Practice: Word Choice The big alligator felt hungry. He moved along the river, looking for something to eat. He saw a nice fish. He went after it. The fish moved away. But the alligator was too quick for him. Snap! He ate that whole fish right down.
  69. 69. Partner Practice: Word Choice 1. Read the paragraph aloud. 2. Brainstorm interesting words you could use in place of the underlined words. 3. Choose favorites from each set of brainstormed words. 4. Re-read the paragraph with the new lively words. Notice the difference!
  70. 70. Partner Practice: Word Choice The alligator felt . He along the river, for something to . He saw a fish. He after it. The fish away. But the alligator was too quick for him. Snap! He that whole fish right down.
  71. 71. Break Please be ready to start in 15 minutes.
  72. 72. Teaching the Trait of Sentence Fluency
  73. 73. Definition of Sentence Fluency Sentence fluency is the rhythm and flow of sentences that makes a text both easy and pleasurable to read. When sentence fluency is strong, it is easy to read a text aloud with lots of interpretation and inflection; it dances gracefully from one sentence to the next. Strong sentence fluency is also marked by variety in both sentence length and structure. Variety lends interest to the text and helps keep sleepy readers awake.
  74. 74. Characteristics of Sentence Fluency • The writing has an easy flow, rhythm, and cadence. • Sentences vary in length, as well as in structure. • Purposeful and varied sentence beginnings. • Sentences enhance the meaning.
  75. 75. Sentence Fluency: Questions for Writers • Did you have any easy (not so easy) time reading your paper aloud? Why do you think that might be? • How many times did you begin with the same word? • How many times did you use the same verb? • Did I use some long sentences? • Did I use some short sentences?
  76. 76. Student-Friendly Checklist: Sentence Fluency • My sentences begin in different ways. • Some sentences are short and some are long. • It just sounds good as I read it aloud-it flows. • My sentences have power and punch. • I have “sentence sense.”
  77. 77. ABC Fairy Tales • Choose a familiar fairy tale or story you know well. • Write a retelling of the story in which each sentence begins with the next letter in the alphabet.
  78. 78. Partner Practice: Sentence Fluency I looked outside. I saw it was raining. I got my umbrella. I got my raincoat. I got my boots. I did not want to get wet. I was ready for a rainy day! I took off for school.
  79. 79. Partner Practice: Sentence Fluency 1. Read the paragraph aloud. 2. Get some new beginnings! 3. Re-read your revised paragraph and listen to the difference.
  80. 80. Partner Practice: Sentence Fluency I looked outside. I saw it was raining. I got my umbrella. I got my raincoat. I got my boots. I did not want to get wet. I was ready for a rainy day! I took off for school.
  81. 81. Round Robin Story Telling • Divide the class into small groups of 5 or 6. • Give each group a brief phrase that is the beginning of the sentence. • Ask the first student to add 1-3 words to expand the phrase. • Ask other students to take turns adding 1-3 words to create a fluid sentence. • When students are done, share the sentences aloud.
  82. 82. Standing Sentences
  83. 83. Sentence Stretching The cat slept. Stretched out on its back, paws dangling in the air, exposed to any passerby, the cat slept peacefully on the couch, as safe and secure as an infant dozing on it’s mother’s lap.
  84. 84. Sentence Stretching • Matthew ate a pizza. • The dog was hungry. • The house was empty. • My sister got mad. • The rain came down. • My shoes were tight. Write 10 simple sentences for your students to expand.
  85. 85. Sentence Combining • My dog Sparky is going to get into trouble. • Sparky is going to get into trouble because he won’t leave the neighbor’s cat alone.
  86. 86. Teaching the Trait of Conventions
  87. 87. Definition of Conventions Anything a copy editor might deal with falls under the heading of conventions: spelling, punctuation, capitalization, paragraphing, grammar and usage. In our definition, we also include creative layout since appearance on the page has as much to do with processing text as any other convention. The whole purpose of this trait is to enhance the visual appeal and readability – to make the information enticing and accessible. Creative layout might include such issues as appropriate and appealing use of fonts, use of visual or graphic organizers like numbers and bullets, use of illustrations, and general presentation on the page.
  88. 88. Characteristics of Conventions • Mechanics don’t detract from meaning. • Spelling is generally correct. • Punctuation is accurate. • Paragraphing tends to be sound.
  89. 89. Conventions: Questions for Writers • Did I leave spaces between words? • Did I use a title? • Did I use periods or question marks? • Did I use capital letters in the right places? • Is it easy to read my spelling? • Could another person read my paper?
  90. 90. Student-Friendly Checklist: Conventions • I don’t have many mistakes in my paper. • I have used capitals correctly. • Periods, commas, exclamation marks and quotation marks are in the right places. • Almost every words is spelled correctly. • I remembered to indent each paragraph. • It would not take long to get the ready to share.
  91. 91. Mentor Texts/Model Sentences When I was little, . . . Now . . .
  92. 92. Apply to Your Favorite Place When I’m (at my favorite place), . . .
  93. 93. Creating a Punctuation Superhero • Name of superhero • What powers (rules of punctuation) does this superhero possess? • What is his/her motto, or saying (to remind people of the punctuation rule)? • Draw the superhero and include the above three characteristics.
  94. 94. Metaphor for the Six Traits • Ideas—(the heart) the content • Organization—(the internal structure; the skeleton) the logical pattern in which content is presented • Voice—(the soul) the unique style and feeling with which the writer expresses content • Word Choice (the ears, eyes, nose, mouth, nerve endings) the choice of language that communicates accurately and vividly the ideas
  95. 95. Metaphor for the Six Traits • Sentence Fluency—(the muscles) the word patterns and sentence structures that allow the writing to move smoothly from idea to idea • Conventions—(the skin) the level of correctness in the use of grammatical structures, punctuation, spelling, and capitalization • Presentation—(clothing) the form and layout that make the communication pleasing to the eye
  96. 96. Six Traits Aerobics
  97. 97. “Teaching Elementary Students to Be Effective Writers” Four Research-Based Recommendations: 1. Provide daily time for students to write. 2. Teach students to use the writing process for a variety of purposes. 2a. Teach students the writing process. 2b. Teach students to write for a variety of purposes. 3. Teach students to become fluent with handwriting, spelling, sentence construction, typing, and word processing 4. Create an engaged community of writers.
  98. 98. Carousel Brainstorming
  99. 99. Carousel Brainstorming Describing Effective Writing Instruction • What does this look like? Sound like? • What is the teacher doing? • What are the students doing?
  100. 100. Gallery Walk
  101. 101. Thank You!

×