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Test your knowledge on copyright
and fair use in education
Kopyright Kwiz
You are producing a short play you have
written. One of the characters has a birthday
during the course of the play, and y...
"Happy Birthday to You" is under copyright until 2030.
While singing it at private birthday parties is perfectly legal,
in...
During your stint as a student teacher, you
come across a great lesson plan in a library
book. It includes sample workshee...
Check the copyright information at the front of the book.
A few educational resources allow unlimited photocopying
of thei...
You record a program from the Public
Broadcasting System (PBS). You show the
film to your psychology class as part of a
pr...
Maybe, Maybe Not
It depends on whether you show the video soon (within 45
days) after it appeared on PBS. Because your pur...
You cover the governor's visit for your campus
newspaper. You take careful notes, making sure
to mark the best quotes. Aft...
While the words a reporter writes are copyrighted (by the
publication, not the reporter), the facts within the report are
...
A history teacher taped the original ABC
news report showing Richard Nixon
leaving the White House after he
resigned. She ...
That’s Not Fair!
The answer is “No!”. Congress holds that
videotapes of publicly broadcast shows can only
be shown for 10 ...
A student finds a photo online
dramatizing a pre-Columbian Viking
landing in America. Since the school
symbol is the Vikin...
Far from Fair!
The answer is “No!”. Internet pages are
copyrighted automatically. The student cannot
safely post (and ther...
Give Credit Where Credit Is Due
http://www.copyrightkids.org/quizframes.htm
http://plagiarism.umf.maine.edu/copyright/co...
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Kopyright Kwiz

  1. 1. Test your knowledge on copyright and fair use in education Kopyright Kwiz
  2. 2. You are producing a short play you have written. One of the characters has a birthday during the course of the play, and you have written a scene in which five other characters sing "Happy Birthday to You" around a candle-covered birthday cake.  Is it copyright infringement?
  3. 3. "Happy Birthday to You" is under copyright until 2030. While singing it at private birthday parties is perfectly legal, including the song in a stage play would require that royalties be paid to the copyright holder. When you have a birthday dinner at a restaurant, the employees usually sing an alternate song in order to avoid copyright infringement. How do you avoid copyright infringement? Either contact the copyright holders to request permission, which probably will require a royalty payment, or choose another song that is in the public domain.
  4. 4. During your stint as a student teacher, you come across a great lesson plan in a library book. It includes sample worksheet pages, and you photocopy them to hand out to your students. The exercises work so well that you continue to photocopy the pages when you land your first teaching job the next year.  Is it copyright infringement?
  5. 5. Check the copyright information at the front of the book. A few educational resources allow unlimited photocopying of their pages, but most retain the exclusive right to copy those pages. You may be able to use the first set of photocopies for educational purposes without fear of reprisal, especially if the resource was published very recently. However, using photocopied pages year after year, when the copyright holder could be benefiting from the money your school system would spend buying the book for your students, is copyright infringement. How do you avoid copyright infringement? If the pages are not protected by copyright, use them. If they are, buy the workbooks for your students.
  6. 6. You record a program from the Public Broadcasting System (PBS). You show the film to your psychology class as part of a presentation.  Is it copyright infringement?
  7. 7. Maybe, Maybe Not It depends on whether you show the video soon (within 45 days) after it appeared on PBS. Because your purpose was educational, you are within the realm of fair use. However, if you continue to show the recording in future semesters, you are guilty of copyright infringement. Programs recorded from pay services (cable, satellite dish) are not subject to fair use guidelines.  You may record programs for your personal use, but showing them to audiences is against the law.
  8. 8. You cover the governor's visit for your campus newspaper. You take careful notes, making sure to mark the best quotes. Afterward, you snag a few minutes of the governor's time, asking a well-prepared question while reporters from local professional media wait their turn. You are shocked to see the local newspaper's next-day story, which includes the answer the governor gave to YOUR question. While you have written your campus newspaper story, it will not appear in print until next week.  Is it copyright infringement?
  9. 9. While the words a reporter writes are copyrighted (by the publication, not the reporter), the facts within the report are not. The words in this website are copyrighted, but the ideas contained within the site are not. Because the governor answered your question at an open forum, with other reporters around, the quote is not yours alone to use. How do you avoid copyright infringement? There wasn't any in this case. However, your well- thought-out question may earn you the respect of your colleagues and ultimately help you land your first professional writing job. To get a true scoop, call or meet with the governor privately to get your own quotes.
  10. 10. A history teacher taped the original ABC news report showing Richard Nixon leaving the White House after he resigned. She made it at home on her personal VCR and used her own tape. She uses the entire news program every year in her classroom. This is fair use.
  11. 11. That’s Not Fair! The answer is “No!”. Congress holds that videotapes of publicly broadcast shows can only be shown for 10 days afterwards unless the copyright holder grants greater allowances for educators. The time has long passed when she should have asked permission or purchased the tape.
  12. 12. A student finds a photo online dramatizing a pre-Columbian Viking landing in America. Since the school symbol is the Viking, he uses this photo as a graphic element on the school's Web page--giving credit to the site from which it was copied. This is fair use.
  13. 13. Far from Fair! The answer is “No!”. Internet pages are copyrighted automatically. The student cannot safely post (and therefore re-copyright) anything for the general public without permission--even if credit is given. Use in a classroom report would have been okay.
  14. 14. Give Credit Where Credit Is Due http://www.copyrightkids.org/quizframes.htm http://plagiarism.umf.maine.edu/copyright/copy_infrin.ht ml http://www.csus.edu/indiv/p/peachj/edte230/copyright/ quiz.htm http://www.techlearning.com/techlearning/pdf/suppleme nts/CopyrightGuide200506_1.pdf http://www.halldavidson.net/quiz1.pdf

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