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CREATING A STUDENT-
CENTERED LEARNING CLIMATE:
Setting High Social and Academic
Expectations
Learning Objectives:
1. Benchmarks school performance
2. Establishes and models high social and academic
expectations for ...
House rules:
1. Lahat kasali, kasali lahat
2. Walang tama. walang mali.
3. Walang boss, walang alipin.
4. Ang pagiging mah...
Read the following situation:
Just as Ms. Santos is beginning a
lesson, Macario approaches her with
a question. Ms. Santos...
The class begins the lesson, with Ms. Santos asking the
students various questions. Macario calls out the answers
to sever...
As Ms. Santos begins to give directions for independent
work, Macario stares out the window. Ms. Santos asks him
to stop a...
Group Activity:
(40 minutes preparation, 20 minutes reporting of all groups)
(60 minutes)
ABSTRACTION
Understanding Our Students
Dealing With Student Behavior in
Today’s Classrooms
We can trace out-of-control behaviors to a
variety of factors:
• The physical and emotional climate of the child's
home an...
• The positive and negative role models
available to the child
• The child’s exposure to violent media
• The child’s emoti...
Why Kids Misbehave
1. Basic has several “Functions”:
2. Attention from peers or adults
3. Attain power/control
4. Revenge ...
Proactive Intervention Strategies
1. Classroom Rules
2. Classroom Schedule
3. Physical Space
4. Attention Signal
5. Beginn...
8. Make your rules describe behavior that is
measurable.
9. Assign consequences to breaking the rules.
10. Always include ...
Examples
Inappropriate Rules:
-Be responsible
- Pay attention
- Do your best
- Be kind to others
- Respect authority
Be po...
ABCD (Antecedents-Behavior-Consequences-
Demand) Analysis
What Are the
Antecedents of
the Behavior?
What Is the
Behavior?
...
Behavioral Intervention Plan
Goals Interventions Individuals Evaluation
1. To
decrease
Macario’s
callouts and
extraneous
c...
Behavioral Intervention Plan
Goals Interventions Individuals Evaluation
2. To
increase
Macario’s
work
completio
n
2. Relat...
Behavioral Intervention Plan
Goals Interventions Individuals Evaluation
3. To increase
Macario’s
in-seat
behavior
3. Use c...
Behavioral Intervention Plan
Goals Interventions Individuals Evaluation
4. To
increase
Macario’s
involvement
in
after-scho...
Consequences
•The best consequences are reasonable and
logical
•A reasonable consequence is one that follows
logically fro...
For the following types of student behavior, develop both an example of
a logical consequence and an illogical consequence...
Students Who Cause Behavioral
Problems:
•Aggressive (the hyperactive, agitated, unruly
student)
•Resistant (the student wh...
The number one problem in
the classroom is not
discipline; it is the lack of
procedures and routines.
Effective teachers introduce
rules, procedures, and routines
on the very first day of school
and continue to teach and
rei...
Discipline vs. Procedure
Discipline: Concerns how students BEHAVE
Procedures: Concerns how things are DONE
Discipline: HAS...
Students must know from the very beginning
how they are expected to behave and work in
a classroom environment.
DISCIPLINE...
Procedures
•Are statements of student expectations necessary to participate
successfully in classroom activities, to learn...
• A PROCEDURE is
how you want
something done
• It is the
responsibility of the
the teacher to
communicate
effectively
• A ...
A smooth-running class is the
responsibility of the teacher,
and it is the result of the
teacher’s ability to teach
proced...
Procedures answer questions such as…
1. What to do when the bell rings
2. What to do when the pencil breaks
3. What to do ...
Discipline with the Body…not the Mouth…
1. EXCUSE yourself from what you are doing
2. RELAX. Take a slow relaxing breath a...
6. If backtalk occurs, relax, wait and KEEP QUIET. If the student wants
to talk back, keep the first principle of dealing ...
Beginning and Ending Routines…
Entering Class
Goal: Students will feel welcome and will
immediately go to their seats and ...
Beginning and Ending Routines…
Ending Routine
Goal: Your procedures for ending the day/class
will:
Ensure that students wi...
Student Work
•Design efficient procedures for assigning,
monitoring, and collecting student work.
•5 Major Areas of Managi...
Ponder This…
•You don’t build your football team on
the day of the game.
•You don’t drill a well when you get
thirsty.
•An...
If the classroom is a fish bowl…
•Piranha
•Catfish
•Goldfish
Piranha
•Are usually the “trouble-makers”
•Can be passive aggressive or overtly
aggressive
•Have negative attitude
•Have a...
Catfish•Go with the flow
•Are usually good-natured, but have limited
motivation
•Are social beings
•Tend to cooperate; fol...
Goldfish
•Are in the top 10-15% of their class
•Are “teacher pleasers”
•Are highly motivated to perform well
•Show enthusi...
Pre-Planning Strategies
1. Determine the learning styles of your students
2. Determine reading levels/skills of students
3...
Essential Questions
1. What do I want all students to know and be able
to do at the end of this lesson?
2. What will I do ...
Think-Pair-Share
“Best Practices” in Lesson Planning
Some Guiding Principles
Adapted From: 63 Ways of Teaching or Learning...
Thinking It Through
•Lesson Content
•Learning Level
•Instructional Methods, Materials,
Activities
•Student Activities
•Eva...
The Lesson Plan Rubric
Academic Focus
Instructional Strategies
Student Engagement
Writing Strategy
Reading Strategy
Techno...
Unmotivated Students…
The Unmotivated Student
1. Problems often emerge during late
elementary or middle school.
2. Often initiated by early acad...
The Unmotivated Student
Factors That Influence Motivation:
Fear of Failure – “Better to look bad, than
stupid”. Safer not ...
The Unmotivated Student
Lack of Challenge
Desire for Attention – look helpless to
teacher
Peer Concern – not cool to like ...
Unmotivated Student Interventions
1. Vary Your Teaching Style
2. Relate Instruction to Student’s Interests
3. Make Instruc...
HYPERACTIVITY
•Constant movement
•Easily distracted
•Lack of control
•Verbal
•Does not attend to cues
• Provide structured...
INATTENTION
Passive
Minimal problem-
solving skills
Dependent learner
Views ability versus
effort as a problem
 Focus...
IMPULSIVITY
Speaks before thinking
out answers
Cannot monitor
behavior
Impatient with
repetition
Avoids anxiety
Provi...
DISRUPTIVE BEHAVIOR
Refuses to do work
Defy authority
Intimidates other students
Distract teaching through
verbal or p...
Now What?
Where do we go from here?
ANALYSIS
As a teacher, your personal interest in
students also can be demonstrated by
establishing and maintaining rapport
with the...
Rapport can be established by:
• listening actively,
• talking to students about topics that interest
them,
• showing an i...
Rapport can be established by:
• displaying empathy and giving emotional support,
• letting them perform activities in whi...
SCHOOLWIDE POSITIVE BEHAVIORAL
SUPPORT SYSTEM
1. agree on unified expectations, rules, and procedures;
2. use wrap-around ...
SCHOOLWIDE POSITIVE BEHAVIORAL
SUPPORT SYSTEM
5. offer a meaningful and interactive curriculum and a
range of individualiz...
Each group must prepare a presentation about
the idea in the video that was presented.
Group 1 – Cheer
Group 2 – Slogan
Gr...
Prepared by:
NOEL S. ORTEGA
Principal II, Milagrosa ES, Carmona, Cavite
Kto12 Chief Trainer and TG & LM Writer
NEAP Facili...
- Bucalos & Lingo, 2005;Goodwin & Judd, 2005;McAdams & Lambie, 2003; Price & Nelson, 2007;Owens
& Dieker, 2003).
- https:/...
Creating a Student Centered Learning Climate
Creating a Student Centered Learning Climate
Creating a Student Centered Learning Climate
Creating a Student Centered Learning Climate
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Creating a Student Centered Learning Climate

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This is my personal presentation as division and regional facilitator for SHDP

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Creating a Student Centered Learning Climate

  1. 1. CREATING A STUDENT- CENTERED LEARNING CLIMATE: Setting High Social and Academic Expectations
  2. 2. Learning Objectives: 1. Benchmarks school performance 2. Establishes and models high social and academic expectations for all 3. Creates and engaging learning environment 4. Participates in the management of learner behaviour within the school and other school related activities done outside the school 5. Supports learners’ desire to pursue further learning 6. Recognizes high performing learners and teachers and supportive parents, and other stakeholders.
  3. 3. House rules: 1. Lahat kasali, kasali lahat 2. Walang tama. walang mali. 3. Walang boss, walang alipin. 4. Ang pagiging mahiyain is not setting high social and academic expectations 5. RESPECT
  4. 4. Read the following situation: Just as Ms. Santos is beginning a lesson, Macario approaches her with a question. Ms. Santos tells Macario that she cannot answer it now and asks him to return to his seat. On the way to his seat, Macario stops to joke around with his classmates, and Ms. Santos again asks him to sit in his seat. Macario walks halfway to his desk and then turns to ask one of his classmates if he can borrow a piece of paper. Again, Ms. Santos asks him to find his seat, and he finally complies.
  5. 5. The class begins the lesson, with Ms. Santos asking the students various questions. Macario calls out the answers to several questions, and Ms. Santos reminds him to raise his hand. As the lesson continues, Macario touches another student, and the student swats Macario’s hand away. He then makes faces at Samantha, who is sitting next to him. Samantha laughs and starts sticking her tongue out at Macario. Macario raises his hand to respond to a question but cannot remember what he wants to say when Ms. Santos calls on him, and starts making up a story and telling jokes. The class laughs, and Ms. Santos tells Macario to pay attention.
  6. 6. As Ms. Santos begins to give directions for independent work, Macario stares out the window. Ms. Santos asks him to stop and get to work. He works on the assignment for 2 minutes and then “trips” on his way to the wastepaper basket. The class laughs, and Ms. Santos tells Macario to return to his seat and get to work. When he reaches his desk, he begins to search for a book, and makes a joke about himself. His classmates laugh, and Ms. Santos reminds Macario to work on the assignment. At the end of the period, Ms. Santos collects the students’ work, and notes that Macario and many of his classmates have only completed a small part of the assignment.
  7. 7. Group Activity: (40 minutes preparation, 20 minutes reporting of all groups) (60 minutes)
  8. 8. ABSTRACTION
  9. 9. Understanding Our Students Dealing With Student Behavior in Today’s Classrooms
  10. 10. We can trace out-of-control behaviors to a variety of factors: • The physical and emotional climate of the child's home and neighborhood • The amount of stability and consistency in the child’s family • The parenting styles of the child’s parents • The power and influence of peers in a child’s life*
  11. 11. • The positive and negative role models available to the child • The child’s exposure to violent media • The child’s emotional and physical health • The child’s own attitude toward his/her anger*
  12. 12. Why Kids Misbehave 1. Basic has several “Functions”: 2. Attention from peers or adults 3. Attain power/control 4. Revenge or Retaliation 5. Feels Good/Play 6. Fear of Failure 7. Getting something (Sensory Input) 8. Imitation
  13. 13. Proactive Intervention Strategies 1. Classroom Rules 2. Classroom Schedule 3. Physical Space 4. Attention Signal 5. Beginning and Ending Routines 6. Student Work 7. Classroom Management Plan adapted from the Tough Kid series, and CHAMPs
  14. 14. 8. Make your rules describe behavior that is measurable. 9. Assign consequences to breaking the rules. 10. Always include a “compliance rule”. 11. Keep the rules posted. 12. Consider having rules recited daily for first two weeks then periodically..
  15. 15. Examples Inappropriate Rules: -Be responsible - Pay attention - Do your best - Be kind to others - Respect authority Be polite Preferred Rules: – Keep hands, feet, and objects to yourself. – Raise your hand and wait for permission to speak. – Sit in your seat unless you have permission to leave it. – Walk, don’t run, at all times in the classroom.
  16. 16. ABCD (Antecedents-Behavior-Consequences- Demand) Analysis What Are the Antecedents of the Behavior? What Is the Behavior? What Are the Consequences of the Behavior? What Are the Demand of the Behavior? - Teacher-directed activity - Content of the activity- - Individualized nature of the activity - Duration of the activity - Location of Macario’s work area - Placement of peers’ work areas - Proximity of the teacher - Teacher comment or question - Availability of other activities Macario calls out, makes extraneous comments in response to teacher questions or comments, distracts others, leaves his work area, and completes a limited amount of work. - Receives teacher attention - Receives peer attention - Avoids unmotivating activity - Performs a pleasant activity (e.g., interacting with peers) - Receives reprimand - Leaves seat - To avoid or express his disappointment with the instructional activity - To receive attention from adults and peers
  17. 17. Behavioral Intervention Plan Goals Interventions Individuals Evaluation 1. To decrease Macario’s callouts and extraneous comments Teach Macario to use a self- management system that employs culturally appropriate reinforcers selected by Matthew 1. Macario • Teachers • Family members • School psychologist 1. Data on Macario’s callouts and extraneous comments • Teachers, student, and family interview data
  18. 18. Behavioral Intervention Plan Goals Interventions Individuals Evaluation 2. To increase Macario’s work completio n 2. Relate the content of the instructional activity to Macario’s experiential background and interests. • Use cooperative learning groups. • Promote active student responding via response cards and group physical responses. • Provide Matthew with choices in terms of the content and process of the instructional activities. • Solicit feedback from students concerning the ways to demonstrate mastery. • Use culturally relevant materials. • Personalize instruction by using students’ names, interests, and experiences. • Use suspense, games, technology, role- plays, and simulations. • Teach learning strategies. 2. Macario • Teachers • Family members • Principal 2. Data on Macario’s work completion and accuracy • Teacher, student, and family interview data
  19. 19. Behavioral Intervention Plan Goals Interventions Individuals Evaluation 3. To increase Macario’s in-seat behavior 3. Use cooperative learning groups. • Use group-oriented response cost system. • Establish a classwide peer mediation system. • Place Macario’s desk near the teacher’s work area. 3. Macario • Teachers • Peers • Family members • School psychologist • Principal 3. Data on Macario’s in-seat behavior • Teacher, student, and family interview data
  20. 20. Behavioral Intervention Plan Goals Interventions Individuals Evaluation 4. To increase Macario’s involvement in after-school activities 4. Teach social skills. • Pair Matthew with peers who participate in after-school activities. • Invite community groups and school-based groups to talk to the class about their after-school activities. • Share and read in class materials about community and leisure activities. • Take field trips to community facilities and after-school activities in the community. • Work with school and community groups to increase the availability of after-school activities. 4. Macario • Teachers • Peers • Family members • Community members • Counselor • Principal 4. Data on after- school activities attended by Macario • Teachers, student, family, counselor, and community member interview data
  21. 21. Consequences •The best consequences are reasonable and logical •A reasonable consequence is one that follows logically from the behavior rather than one that is arbitrarily imposed •The best logical consequences teach the students to choose between acceptable and unacceptable actions.
  22. 22. For the following types of student behavior, develop both an example of a logical consequence and an illogical consequence •Chews gum •Turns in sloppy paper •Walks in the classroom noisily •Passes paper in incorrectly •Arrives late •Does not bring textbook •Does not bring pencil or pen
  23. 23. Students Who Cause Behavioral Problems: •Aggressive (the hyperactive, agitated, unruly student) •Resistant (the student who won’t work) •Distractible (the student who can’t concentrate) •Dependent (the student who wants help all the time)
  24. 24. The number one problem in the classroom is not discipline; it is the lack of procedures and routines.
  25. 25. Effective teachers introduce rules, procedures, and routines on the very first day of school and continue to teach and reinforce them throughout the school year.
  26. 26. Discipline vs. Procedure Discipline: Concerns how students BEHAVE Procedures: Concerns how things are DONE Discipline: HAS penalties and rewards Procedures: Have NO penalties or rewards A procedure is simply a method or process for how things are to be done in a classroom.
  27. 27. Students must know from the very beginning how they are expected to behave and work in a classroom environment. DISCIPLINE dictates how students are to behave PROCEDURES and ROUTINES dictate how students are to work
  28. 28. Procedures •Are statements of student expectations necessary to participate successfully in classroom activities, to learn, and to function effectively in the school environment •Allow many different activities to take place efficiently during the school day, often several at the same time, with a minimum of wasted time and confusion •Increase on-task time and greatly reduce classroom disruptions •Tell a student how things operate in the classroom, thus reducing discipline problems
  29. 29. • A PROCEDURE is how you want something done • It is the responsibility of the the teacher to communicate effectively • A ROUTINE is what the student does automatically without prompting or supervision • Becomes a habit, practice, or custom for the student
  30. 30. A smooth-running class is the responsibility of the teacher, and it is the result of the teacher’s ability to teach procedures.
  31. 31. Procedures answer questions such as… 1. What to do when the bell rings 2. What to do when the pencil breaks 3. What to do when you hear an emergency alert signal 4. What to do when you finish your work early 5. What to do when you have a question 6. What to do when you need to go to the restroom 7. How to enter the classroom 8. Where to put completed work
  32. 32. Discipline with the Body…not the Mouth… 1. EXCUSE yourself from what you are doing 2. RELAX. Take a slow relaxing breath and CALMLY approach the student with a meaningful look. 3. FACE the student directly and CALMLY wait for a response. 4. If there is no response, WHISPER the student’s first name and follow with what you want the student to do, ending with “please”. RELAX and WAIT. 5. If the student does not get to work, RELAX and WAIT. Repeat Step 4 if necessary.
  33. 33. 6. If backtalk occurs, relax, wait and KEEP QUIET. If the student wants to talk back, keep the first principle of dealing with backtalk in mind: IT TAKES ONE FOOL TO TALK BACK. IT TAKES TWO FOOLS TO MAKE A CONVERSTAION OUT OF IT. 7. When the student responds with the appropriate behavior say, “Thank you,” and leave with an affirmative SMILE. If a student goes so far as to earn an office referral, you can deliver it just as well RELAXED. After all, ruining your composure and peace of mind does not enhance classroom management. -Adapted from Fred Jones, Positive Classroom Discipline and Positive Classroom Instruction
  34. 34. Beginning and Ending Routines… Entering Class Goal: Students will feel welcome and will immediately go to their seats and start on a productive task. Greet the students at the door. Have a task prepared for students to work on as they sit down. Do your “housekeeping”. Keep tasks short (3-5 min.) When you’ve finished, address the task.
  35. 35. Beginning and Ending Routines… Ending Routine Goal: Your procedures for ending the day/class will: Ensure that students will not leave the classroom before they have organized their own materials and completed any necessary clean-up tasks. Ensure the you have enough time to give students both positive and corrective feedback, and to set a positive tone or parting prayer for ending the class.
  36. 36. Student Work •Design efficient procedures for assigning, monitoring, and collecting student work. •5 Major Areas of Managing Student Work: Assigning Class Work and Homework Managing Independent Work Periods Collecting Completed Work Keeping Records and Providing Feedback Dealing with Late/Missing Assignments
  37. 37. Ponder This… •You don’t build your football team on the day of the game. •You don’t drill a well when you get thirsty. •And you don’t discuss procedures once an emergency has begun.
  38. 38. If the classroom is a fish bowl… •Piranha •Catfish •Goldfish
  39. 39. Piranha •Are usually the “trouble-makers” •Can be passive aggressive or overtly aggressive •Have negative attitude •Have attendance problems •Are “at risk” •Etc., etc., etc……
  40. 40. Catfish•Go with the flow •Are usually good-natured, but have limited motivation •Are social beings •Tend to cooperate; follow MOST rules •Perform to the average or just enough to stay out of trouble with mom/dad •Etc., etc., etc……
  41. 41. Goldfish •Are in the top 10-15% of their class •Are “teacher pleasers” •Are highly motivated to perform well •Show enthusiasm for learning •May be “over achievers” and /or high achievers •Etc., etc., etc…….
  42. 42. Pre-Planning Strategies 1. Determine the learning styles of your students 2. Determine reading levels/skills of students 3. Inventory access to technology 4. Connect writing to what is being taught 5. Focus on academic expectations and core content 6. Establish a variety of instructional strategies
  43. 43. Essential Questions 1. What do I want all students to know and be able to do at the end of this lesson? 2. What will I do to cause this learning to happen? 3. What will students do to facilitate this learning? 4. How will I assess to find out if this learning happened? 5. What will I do for those who show through assessment that the learning did not take place?
  44. 44. Think-Pair-Share “Best Practices” in Lesson Planning Some Guiding Principles Adapted From: 63 Ways of Teaching or Learning Anything by Gary Phillips and Maurice Gibbons
  45. 45. Thinking It Through •Lesson Content •Learning Level •Instructional Methods, Materials, Activities •Student Activities •Evaluation Tools, Strategies, Activities
  46. 46. The Lesson Plan Rubric Academic Focus Instructional Strategies Student Engagement Writing Strategy Reading Strategy Technology Strategy Assessment Strategy
  47. 47. Unmotivated Students…
  48. 48. The Unmotivated Student 1. Problems often emerge during late elementary or middle school. 2. Often initiated by early academic problem. 3. Begins to see school as a place of “drudgery”. 4. Will most often become discipline problem. 5. At risk of becoming a “drop out”.
  49. 49. The Unmotivated Student Factors That Influence Motivation: Fear of Failure – “Better to look bad, than stupid”. Safer not to try. Lack of Meaning – May not see relevance to assignments. Emotional Distress – Anxiety/Depression from influences at home. Learning Disability – Give up in frustration.
  50. 50. The Unmotivated Student Lack of Challenge Desire for Attention – look helpless to teacher Peer Concern – not cool to like school Low Expectation – no encouragement from home Expression of Anger – due to pressure from parents
  51. 51. Unmotivated Student Interventions 1. Vary Your Teaching Style 2. Relate Instruction to Student’s Interests 3. Make Instruction Relevant to Real World 4. Provide Hands-on Activities 5. Apply “Meaningful Work”…CHAMPs 6. Allow Student Some Control over What and How He Learns 7. Praise Student’s Efforts and Accomplishments 8. If Student is Too Cool, consider incentives, rewards, group recognition ( spark some competition) 9. Challenge the Students
  52. 52. HYPERACTIVITY •Constant movement •Easily distracted •Lack of control •Verbal •Does not attend to cues • Provide structured high activity tasks • Allow for control movement • Reward on-task behaviors • Use color codes for recognitions of behaviors
  53. 53. INATTENTION Passive Minimal problem- solving skills Dependent learner Views ability versus effort as a problem  Focus attention on key elements of activity  Develop and mental map with student  Facilitate routine success  Help the student self- monitor performance
  54. 54. IMPULSIVITY Speaks before thinking out answers Cannot monitor behavior Impatient with repetition Avoids anxiety Provide short and specific directions Reflective evaluation Develop problem-solving Model expected behaviors Allow behavior outlets
  55. 55. DISRUPTIVE BEHAVIOR Refuses to do work Defy authority Intimidates other students Distract teaching through verbal or physical means  Reinforce positive behavior  Use high interest personally relevant material  Provide short successes
  56. 56. Now What? Where do we go from here?
  57. 57. ANALYSIS
  58. 58. As a teacher, your personal interest in students also can be demonstrated by establishing and maintaining rapport with them.
  59. 59. Rapport can be established by: • listening actively, • talking to students about topics that interest them, • showing an interest in students’ personal lives, • letting them know you missed them when they are absent and welcoming them back, • sharing your own interests and stories,
  60. 60. Rapport can be established by: • displaying empathy and giving emotional support, • letting them perform activities in which they excel, • greeting students by name, • scheduling surprises for them, • doing favors for them and allowing them to do things for you, • acknowledging their performance and behavior, • participating in after-school activities with them, • recognizing special events in students’ lives such as birthdays, • displaying kindness, • spending informal time with students, and • complimenting them
  61. 61. SCHOOLWIDE POSITIVE BEHAVIORAL SUPPORT SYSTEM 1. agree on unified expectations, rules, and procedures; 2. use wrap-around school- and community-based services and interventions; 3. create a caring, warm, and safe learning environment and community of support; 4. understand and address student diversity;
  62. 62. SCHOOLWIDE POSITIVE BEHAVIORAL SUPPORT SYSTEM 5. offer a meaningful and interactive curriculum and a range of individualized instructional strategies; 6. teach social skills and self-control; and 7. evaluate the impact of the system on students, educators, families, and the community and revise it based on these data.
  63. 63. Each group must prepare a presentation about the idea in the video that was presented. Group 1 – Cheer Group 2 – Slogan Group 3 – Cinquain Group 4 – Tanaga Group 5 – Four-line Song Group 6 - Mantra
  64. 64. Prepared by: NOEL S. ORTEGA Principal II, Milagrosa ES, Carmona, Cavite Kto12 Chief Trainer and TG & LM Writer NEAP Facilitator
  65. 65. - Bucalos & Lingo, 2005;Goodwin & Judd, 2005;McAdams & Lambie, 2003; Price & Nelson, 2007;Owens & Dieker, 2003). - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e6ieXLVCss4 - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2C-bvenTdYE http://1.bp.blogspot.com/203JMiS3QKA/UjngIWN2wpI/AAAAAAAADYo/M7TxiocDQi8/s1600/It+Takes+A +Village+To+Raise+A+Child.jpg
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This is my personal presentation as division and regional facilitator for SHDP

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