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How to present without killing anyone slideshare upload

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How to present without killing anyone slideshare upload

  1. 1. Be honest…….  Have you ever sat through an unbelievably boring presentation?  Have you ever been a “PowerPoint assassin?”
  2. 2. Objectives for today • Learn the ingredients of an effective presentation.
  3. 3. Objectives for today • Know how to make interesting presentations that people actively listen to and remember.
  4. 4. Objectives for today • Help you to make your presentations more sales oriented, and increase your audience’s buy-in to your ideas.
  5. 5. Why people find presentations boring…… The 2013 Annoying PowerPoint Survey • % agreement of respondents  The speaker read the slides to us 72.0%  The text was so small I couldn’t read it 50.6%  Full sentences instead of bullet points 48.4%  Overly complex diagrams 30.8%  Poor colour choices 25.8%  No clear purpose 22.1%  No flow of ideas 21.0%  Little change from previous surveys  It seems that people are not getting better at presenting.
  6. 6. Why people find presentations boring…… The 2013 Annoying PowerPoint Survey  Presenters make 4 key mistakes in preparing  They don’t plan their presentation well; it lacks a clear message, flow, and structure  They don’t customise – they recycle slides produced for a different purpose without thinking about this audience  Poor visual design makes their messages difficult to read and understand. Too much detail confuses their audience  They confuse the purpose of the slide deck. Is it a presentation or a document for circulation afterwards? Too many slides are included.
  7. 7. The 2013 Annoying PowerPoint Survey:  According to responders, presenters need to:  Improve slide design, avoid poor (unreadable) colour selections and fonts; and formatting and layouts that vary between slides. Nothing should distract the audience from your messages  Eliminate “walls of text”, unreadable spreadsheets (tiny fonts), over-complex graphics, badly chosen images, cheesy ClipArt  Stop using pictures and videos that don’t fit your message (it may be “cool” but is it relevant?), distracting animations and stupid errors  Improve delivery. Stop reading slides, avoid “fillers”. Lack of rehearsal (delivering a different message, skipping slides they haven’t read and don’t understand). Eliminate irritating habits and movements  Notice that 3.5 out of 4 are about preparation. Only one is (partially) about delivery.
  8. 8. How to write a bad presentation ( a purely fictional example) • Leave your preparation to the last minute • Scratch your head at empty slide view • In desperation, copy and paste slides from another presentation (not necessarily on same subject). There, now you have 50 slides. Don’t worry about their relevance…. • Change the date on title slide to show date you are giving presentation (and presenter’s name to yours if necessary) • Add one or two slides, plus the funny video that Tom sent you yesterday. It’s not about the same topic but it is really funny…… • Avoid rehearsal.. it will only make you look….. well, prepared…… • “Wing it” on the day.
  9. 9. A clear goal Goal Visuals PerformanceParticipation Recap and memorable end Early Connection Key messages, structure and content
  10. 10. A big problem with many presentations….  …important messages are lost in the maze of detail.
  11. 11. Less is more…. Michelangelo’s David • When Michelangelo was asked how he carved his statue of David he allegedly said, "It was easy. I took a block of marble and chipped away the parts that didn't look like David.” • Good presentations follow this. Become ABSOLUTELY clear on your goal and your key messages, and chip away anything that doesn’t communicate these • Only say what you need to say • AND NOTHING ELSE • Anything extra confuses your messages.
  12. 12. The most important question to keep asking……. What am I really trying to say?
  13. 13. Exercise - Goal and key messages • Write down the single goal and the key messages (maximum of 3) to summarise your presentation. If you can’t do this automatically, what does that tell you? • If your goal is “To give a presentation” you are probably a “PowerPoint assassin” • Look critically at your presentation so far. Does your presentation clearly communicate your goal and key messages? Is there any extra stuff there? • Work with a colleague and get an independent view.
  14. 14. Messages, structure and content Goal Visuals PerformanceParticipation Recap and memorable end Early Connection Key messages, structure and content
  15. 15. Storyboarding- laying out the structure • Modern storyboarding is usually credited to Webb Smith, a Walt Disney designer who posted pictures of key points in the story to show the outline of an animated movie • A storyboard lays out the key steps in your presentation, building to achieve the goal • Storyboard before you open PowerPoint- get clear on your goal and key messages before you type anything • This will help to stop you adding unnecessary cr@p and confusing your message.
  16. 16. Template Storyboard for your Presentation Goal for the Presentation (only 1) Key messages to support goal (max 3) Interesting Title Attention Grabbing first slide Key message 1Key message 2Key message 3 Recap and memorable end Questions? Optional Close
  17. 17. Presentation Skills Course Storyboard Goal: Make people understand that every presentation is a sales presentation Key messages: 1. Less is more; cut the crap 2. Clarify your goal and messages and refine the presentation like hell 3. Deliver it compellingly Title: Make your presentations great Attention Grabber. Bad PowerPoints $252m a day. Annoying PowerPoint Survey KM1. Cut the crap. Why too much information confuses your audience KM2. 3 clear messages. Introduction, structure, signposting, visuals KM3. Delivery: Connecting, Performance, Interaction Recap and memorable end Questions? Optional Close
  18. 18. Messages, structure, and content • Having determined your goal and key messages (maximum 3), you need to deliver these • Your presentation needs to have: • An introduction that grabs the audience’s attention • Content that achieves the goal by communicating the key messages • A memorable close that recaps the whole, and leaves the audience with a high impact finish.
  19. 19. A. Boring Presenter
  20. 20. How about starting with a really boring title? • Look at these titles (all posted on Slideshare.net)? • “Psychological Measurement: Construct, variables and definitions” • “How to create presentations that don’t suck” • “Rectification of errors in financial accounts” • “Steal this presentation!” • “Singapore Corporate Tax System” • Which ones would you rather sit through?
  21. 21. A presenter “Wow! This sounds exciting. I’d better sit up and pay attention.”
  22. 22. A presenter “Shall I order a takeaway tonight?”
  23. 23. A presenter “Sounds important… Maybe I should listen.” If it says this however……..
  24. 24. A presenter Doesn’t matter if your topic is “boring”- you just need imagination
  25. 25. A presenter What did you notice about the last two titles?
  26. 26. How interesting is your title? • Take a look at the title of the presentation you brought with you • Imagine you are an attendee for the presentation from a different department and specialism • Based on the title alone, how motivated would you be to pay full attention to the presentation? • Does it sound more interesting than “Singapore Corporate Tax System”? • Does it contain any message/ commentary? • Discuss with a colleague how you might change it.
  27. 27. Ok – now that you have their attention…… • You need to keep their interest and engagement by explaining what you will cover and why it matters to them • Remember INTRO • INTEREST- get their interest • NEED- why do they need to listen to you? • TITLE- explain your (interesting) title • RANGE- What will you cover and not cover? • OBJECTIVE(S)- what will you have achieved by the end of the session?
  28. 28. Interest and Need • These often link together • Your first job -to persuade your audience why they should care about what you are saying • Ideas could be: • An interesting statistic (or more than one) • An unpleasant situation for them to avoid • A potential gain or advantage for them • Whatever you use has to matter to your audience -if it isn’t real to them they won’t care…. • At this stage you only have to get them interested, they don’t have to be committed (yet).
  29. 29. Creating interest and need- possible ideas • How much of their time is wasted listening to bad presentations? Are they doing the same to others? • Explain how they might have more influence through better presentations • Show them a great presenter (on video maybe) • Get them to think of the worst presentations they have ever attended and how they felt • As a rule, the more real it feels to your audience the more persuasive it will be; if they feel it they will connect - if they only understand it they may not connect.
  30. 30. Title, range and objectives • Give your audience an idea of what you will be covering in your presentation (and what you won’t) • Explain your goal and purpose in the presentation. People are more interested in listening if they understand the purpose of having them sit there • Remember to discuss benefits and not just features of your ideas.
  31. 31. Benefits, WIIFM? • What’s the difference between a feature and a benefit? • A feature is a fact about something • Not all features are good • A benefit tells you why a feature is good (see next slide) .
  32. 32. Features and benefits, WIIFM? • A feature is worthless unless the “customer” sees it as valuable (have you ever wanted to carry scissors in your tie?) • Too many presentations talk about features and don’t explain the benefits for the listeners • It’s not enough to give information, you have to tell the audience why the information matters to them.
  33. 33. Presentation content - Getting key messages across • For each key message: • Explain your point and the benefits clearly • Look for ways to make it real for your audience • Explain your messages not just with information, but emotionally (based on stories, pictures, emotions) • Well-chosen “war stories” can create interest, prove your credentials and make your message more “real” to the audience • Personalise your message at an individual level.
  34. 34. Which appeal raises more money?  A) Money that you donate will go to Rokia, a seven-year- old orphan in Sudan. Rokia faces starvation and early death from disease. With your life-saving support, we will feed her, educate her, and provide her with essential medical care.  B) Food shortages in Malawi are affecting more than three million people. In Zambia, severe drought has resulted in a 42% drop in maize production from 2000. About three million Zambians are short of food. Four million Angolans — one-third of the population — face hunger. More than 11 million people in Ethiopia need food assistance. Please give now.
  35. 35. Making it personal beats giving the facts • Psychological studies repeatedly show that people commit more when their emotions are aroused, and respond more positively to emotions than statistics • One example: Deborah Small (a professor at Wharton Business School) demonstrated in a set of famous experiments, that people gave more money to charities when presented with an individual child’s story than with facts about child starvation. • People connect with individuals, and rationalise when faced with statistics. "Sympathy and Callousness: The Impact of Deliberative Thought on Donations to Identifiable and Statistical Victims." Small, Loewenstein and Slovic, March 2007
  36. 36. Making it personal beats giving the facts  “The more statistical information people were given about the plight of a group of people, the less generous they became. Yet emotion-based thoughts failed to increase their generosity to statistical victims.  It’s easy to override people's feelings by giving them statistical information, but it's not so easy to create feelings where those feelings aren't naturally there to begin with. It's hard for humans to generate feelings toward statistics."  Ask yourself- what feelings will be generated by my messages? Prof. Deborah Small
  37. 37. Exercise • Looking at the presentation you brought with you, look through the slides and the messages it contains • Does it grab the attention at the beginning and cover the elements of INTRO? • How much of it describes features and how much explains benefits? • How much of it is factual and rational and how much of it personalises and emotionalises issues? • Work with a colleague to get an independent view, and to identify where and how you might improve it.
  38. 38. Structure-Agendas and signposting • People need to understand where they are in your presentation • Tell them in advance what the structure will be • Remind them along the way where they are in the presentation • People listen more when they understand what is happening.
  39. 39. Ways of sign posting- the "recurring agenda" slide  Goal  Structure  Visuals  Connection  Recap Section 1 Section 2 Goal Structure Visuals Connection Recap
  40. 40. Ways of signposting- The "building" slide Presentation skills Goal Visuals PerformanceParticipation Early Connection Key messages, structure and content Recap and memorable end
  41. 41. Signposting- Exercise • Looking at the presentation you brought with you, look through the slides and the order and flow • Is it laid out clearly, and does the signposting (if it exists) help the audience to follow you as you lay out your messages? • Work with a colleague to get an independent view, and to identify where and how you might improve it.
  42. 42. Structure and content summary • Attention grabber to begin • Presentation objective • Why your audience needs to listen and why they should care • Key messages explained in a personalised way • Explain benefits - not features • Keep them signposted along the way • Always keep it personal and emotional.
  43. 43. Visuals Goal Visuals PerformanceParticipation Recap and memorable end Early Connection Key messages, structure and content
  44. 44. Visuals 01 July 2015 45
  45. 45. Visuals “If you want people to understand better, then get that stuff off the screen... it is simply making it more difficult for people to understand what you are saying.”  – Tom Grimes, Kansas State Journalism Professor 46
  46. 46. Bad Visuals- Text No-one wants to take in information that looks like this • Too many slides have too much text. This makes it easy for the speaker to lose their place on the slide, and harder for the audience to see the main point • Slides with this many words are actually documents not slides- the point of a slide should be to summarise key points briefly, not to reproduce the whole book • People can either listen or read. If they have to read they won’t be listening to you • Don’t give the audience too much work to do. It’s very difficult to figure out what this slide is really trying to say, as there are so many words and nowhere to focus on. Random use of colour does not help especially if you can’t see the yellow • If you are still reading this you must enjoy pain, or are desperately searching for a reward for your effort. I salute your determination; you will be disappointed. Most people give up by now, on the slide, the “speaker” and their presentation • Adding irrelevant pictures (even funny ones) doesn’t really help, unless they reinforce your message-it’s all just too busy and most people’s brains will be confused by all the information they have to absorb. Cheesy picture Irrelevant joke
  47. 47. Bad Visuals- Poor Layout Last updated 01 July 2015 48 Badly designed and laid out slides do this….. This is my first point Here’s my second point Time for a messy picture This is actually my most important point (do you still care?) There’s room for another pointless (fake) picture here By this stage you really don’t care any more Look! A fluffy rabbit!! Now you will be suicidal
  48. 48. Slide Design “Countless presentations fail because their champions use PowerPoint the way Microsoft wants them to, instead of the right way.”  Seth Godin, marketing author  Seth’s 3 rules for slides:  1) Use slides that reinforce your words, not repeat them- people read faster than you can talk  2) Don’t use “cheesy” images  3) No dissolves, spins or other transitions. Last updated 01 July 2015 49
  49. 49. Slides should summarise- they should not contain your whole message • Use powerful images which reinforce what you are saying • Use only a few words on each slide to summarise your message • If the words on the slide say everything, your voice is redundant.
  50. 50. Good slides • Consistent fonts and colours • Images which support your message (use Google or Bing images instead of clip art) • Avoid irritating animations- they detract from your message and irritate people • Like flying in really slowly • Or swivelling • Or teetering • Or Mexican waves • Or bouncing • Sounds can be irritating too Last updated 01 July 2015 51
  51. 51. Good Visuals- CARS • 4 elements of good slide design- remember CARS • Contrast- Keeping the same font and image sizes is boring- vary these to make it interesting • Alignment- align images for consistency, and play with them sometimes to add variety • Repetition of colours, fonts and images make messages memorable and give consistency • Similarity- place related information together on your slides- makes information easier to understand Last updated 01 July 2015 52
  52. 52. Good Visuals- Contrast • Use fonts consistently and use colour for EMPHASIS • Changing font size can also emphasise a point - SUPERSIZE YOUR KEY MESSAGE Last updated 01 July 2015 53 Light on dark also gives a break from standard colours and makes your slides different
  53. 53. Early Connection with the Audience Goal Visuals PerformanceParticipation Memorable end Early Connection Key messages, structure and content
  54. 54. A word on overcoming nerves • Visualization • Visualise yourself being successful and running an enjoyable and lively session • Rehearsal • Practise, practise, practise until you barely have to think about the content • Be prepared • Make a checklist of everything you need for the presentation and make sure that you have assembled all materials beforehand so you know you won’t be missing anything • Allow good time to set up the room and test the equipment. Turning up with only seconds to spare and hoping everything will work means you start flustered and nervous. Make time to chill before you start………… 01 July 2015 55
  55. 55. A word on overcoming nerves(2) • Look confident and think positively • Everyone feels some nerves - in fact a small level of stress (“eustress”) is healthy. Force yourself to act confidently and you will “fake it until you make it” • Deep breaths • Relax your breathing before you start to speak • First sentence • Your first sentence is very important. If you deliver it confidently then good self-talk will kick in. If not then a bad self-talk cycle begins • Break the ice • If you can make people laugh early on it relaxes the audience too. Do this only if you are good at humour though. 01 July 2015 56
  56. 56. A word on overcoming nerves(3) • Someone on your Side • If you have someone you know is a supporter in the room it helps you relax • Memorize first few minutes • If you don’t have to think about the first few minutes it helps to reduce your stress • Notes/Visuals. • Don’t be afraid to use notes. Also build reminders into your slides to reduce your need to remember things • Stuff Happens • Sometimes things will go wrong. Don’t let it get to you. People are sympathetic to this. 01 July 2015 57
  57. 57. A word on overcoming nerves(4) • Check out the audience • If you are presenting in a meeting where you are only attending to present, where possible go along a few minutes early and sit in on the meeting. This will enable you to gauge their mood and sometimes give you clues as to how to present. It also helps you to acclimatise ,and for people to get used to having you there which may smooth your presentation later….. 01 July 2015 58
  58. 58. Connecting with your listeners at the beginning • In the first 60 seconds, you need to convince your audience that you are worth listening to…… • Connect as a person • Tell them what you are going to tell them • Convince them they should listen.
  59. 59. Connecting with your listeners…. • Who is your audience? • Who are the key people to influence? • Why will they be there? • Why are they there? Are they willing participants? • What do they care about? • What are their needs (“pains”)?
  60. 60. Connecting with your listeners…. • What are you offering them? • How will listening to you help them? Tell them why it will…. • Refer to a pain point for them • Offer them a compelling benefit • Tell them an interesting story (but be sure that it is) • Make them laugh (if you can).
  61. 61. Performance Goal Visuals PerformanceParticipation Recap and memorable end Early Connection Key messages, structure and content
  62. 62. Presenting Tips • NEVER just read your slides. People read faster than you talk • Remember the Annoying PowerPoint Survey (72% of respondents mentioned this - the highest reason for complaint) • Tell your audience things that are not on the slide- your words must add to what people can read for themselves. Last updated 01 July 2015 63
  63. 63. Presenting Tips - Nervousness • Be aware of where your hands are and don’t hold anything (other than maybe a clicker). Avoid anything you can fiddle with without realising • Try to avoid “Ers” and “Ums”- fillers… • Pay real attention to your first sentence. A confident first sentence boosts your confidence. A “wimpy” first sentence increases nervousness. Last updated 01 July 2015 64
  64. 64. Presenting Tips- Face the audience when speaking • Don’t talk if you have turned to read the screen. Remember: • Read • Turn • Talk • Try to minimise how often you turn to the screen (by rehearsing you can do it from memory). Turning too often looks unprepared.
  65. 65. Performance – tone, pace and volume  Remember your first sentence is key- make sure it is loud and confident – positive “self- talk”  Monitor your pace- not too fast or slow  Volume at 7/10  Check your pace with the audience after a few minutes  Vary your tone and pitch or you will put them to sleep.
  66. 66. Presenting tips – Body language • Body language • Open stance- if you are open your audience is more likely to be • Hands out of pockets • Know where your hands are! • Purposeful moving can create energy.
  67. 67. Performance – audience reaction • Monitor the audience expression  What are good signs?  What are bad signs?
  68. 68. Performance- standing and movement  What’s important about how you stand and how you move when presenting?
  69. 69. Presenting Tips- Movement • Move with purpose- nervousness can produce random movement- very distracting for your audience if you jiggle about aimlessly • Get in close to your audience- don’t “baseline” • Be aware of people’s line of sight to the screen- avoid blocking the view or casting shadows on the screen.
  70. 70. Participation Goal Visuals PerformanceParticipation Recap and memorable end Early Connection Key messages, structure and content
  71. 71. Participation  What’s important to remember about interacting with your audience in a presentation?
  72. 72. Participation - Empathy and involvement  Empathy  Break the ice in the first two minutes  Smiling and humour  Courtesy- if you are polite they may be also- if you are rude they will be rude for sure
  73. 73. Participation - Empathy and involvement  Involvement – incl. eye contact, inviting comment & participation  Scan the room with your eyes  Show people that you like them- they might like you in return  Thank people for participating and asking questions (and give them a ground rule e.g. now or at the end?)  Ask “What do others think?”
  74. 74. Dealing with difficult individuals • You cannot force people to take part if they are determined not to • You are presenting to everyone. You only have so much responsibility towards individuals if they do not want to take part. Sometimes you cannot bring everyone with you • Your primary responsibility is towards the whole group- you can only give so much attention to one individual. Never reward disruptive behaviour with too much attention • Use the power of the group to help to manage difficult individuals. Last updated 01 July 2015 75
  75. 75. First principles as a presenter- acknowledging existing experience • Expectation setting is important. Find out about the audience’s knowledge and don’t patronise them (even accidentally) • Tell them when some of your material will not be new, or they will tell you (sometimes angrily). If so ask them to view it as a refresher. Last updated 01 July 2015 76
  76. 76. Disengaged, conscripted and angry participants • Have usually brought outside issues into the room (work or personal) • Are best ignored initially unless they are disrupting the outcome for the whole group • 5 stage process for tackling them: • Ask them privately during a break if they are ok (if possible). Show concern rather than accusation. Often they will explain what’s going on and modify their behaviour • Use the group to control them (see later) • If it continues ask the individual publicly to moderate their behaviour. Ask the group if they agree • As a last resort ask them to leave the presentation. Last updated 01 July 2015 77
  77. 77. Disengaged, conscripted and angry participants • They have a right to feel as they feel and to choose not to participate- but not the right to prevent others learning as a result • Appeal to their sense of fairness to others- most people respond to this • Keep your tone matter of fact and emphasise that you are concerned for the good of the majority • Don’t be blackmailed into giving undeserved attention. Last updated 01 July 2015 78
  78. 78. Disruptive attention seekers/ fidgets • They can monopolise conversations and/ or shout down other participants (“know it alls”) • Often think they are right on every issue and dismiss alternative ideas • Encourage them to listen to other views e.g. “ Let’s hear what others think on that point” • Invite the group to comment- “What do others think?” • Fidgets cannot leave their technology behind and play with smartphones/computers/ take calls on cell phones • Ignore them unless they disrupt others. Last updated 01 July 2015 79
  79. 79. Irrelevant discussions/ clowns • Gently point out when a discussion is valid but not pertinent to your topic. “That’s an interesting discussion but we don’t have time to discuss that today” • Ask the group to help keep the discussion focused on the topic • Where possible give feedback during a break asking them to keep to the subject • If they persist, use the same process as for angry participants • People trying to be funny too much can be just as disruptive- follow the same procedure as before. Last updated 01 July 2015 80
  80. 80. Interaction – questions and interruptions  Thank the questioner  Check everyone has heard the question  “What do you think ?”  “What do others think?”  Answer the question- if you can- be willing to admit when you don’t know the answer and commit to checking up and confirming later. Never make up an answer about a factual question  Check that you have answered the question.
  81. 81. “Hostile” Questioning • Sometimes you may feel that the tone of a questioner suggests that they are hostile to you • Firstly, paraphrase their question to ensure that you have understood them correctly • Before you answer, ask them “What do you think?” (or similar). (This is always a good idea even for “friendly” questions) • The questioner will give a more detailed explanation, giving you more data to judge if they really are hostile. Last updated 01 July 2015 82
  82. 82. “Hostile” questioning (2) • Follow this up with “What do others think?” before answering. If e.g. the questioner’s view is extreme let other participants disagree with the questioner first • When it’s your turn, express your view, being careful to express it in terms of e.g. “In my experience”, or “the experts suggest”, or something like that. Steer clear of “I am right and you are wrong”. • Remember you don’t have to force individuals to agree. If the discussion goes on too long cut it short and agree to differ / discuss later. Sometimes people need time to accept a new idea. Don’t hold up the whole group to resolve an argument that may not interest everyone • Remember, “What do you think?” and “What do others think?” are two of the most powerful questions in your toolbox. Use these questions automatically when you are presenting. Last updated 01 July 2015 83
  83. 83. The power of the group with hostile behaviour • Don’t allow yourself to get into one to one combat with disruptive individuals • Always invite the group’s opinion “What do other people think?” • If you have to confront someone in a presentation, explain that you want to get the best result for the group, and keep asking the group if it accepts their behaviour. Usually group members will jump in and support you • If instead you get into a one on one shouting match with an individual, the group may sit back and enjoy the entertainment instead of helping you out. Last updated 01 July 2015 84
  84. 84. Interaction – rational and emotional participants • Think about your questioner- rational or emotional? • Emotional participants sometimes just need acknowledgement • Never put anyone down (especially emotional participants) • You never win an argument in a presentation so don’t get into one.
  85. 85. Memorable Finish Goal Visuals PerformanceParticipation Recap and memorable end Early Connection Key messages, structure and content
  86. 86. Memorable Finish • Two key elements to your finish • Recap- Summarise what you have covered and the key points you want people to remember or agree to • End with a “punch line”- something memorable for your audience that is linked to your goal.
  87. 87. Less is more…. Michelangelo’s David • Only say exactly what you need to say • AND NOTHING ELSE • All extra content confuses your message a little more.
  88. 88. Great Presentations- the 7 elements • 7 steps to a great presentation • A clear goal • Clear key messages, structure and content • Excellent, clear visuals • Connection with your audience at the beginning • Great delivery • Great involvement • A memorable end. Before you enter the room
  89. 89. Introduction - Remember INTRO • INTEREST- get their interest • NEED- why should they care about what you are going to talk about? • TITLE- explain your title • RANGE- overview of the content - what will you cover? • OBJECTIVES- what do you expect to have achieved by the end of the session?
  90. 90. Template Presentation Storyboard Goal for the Presentation (only 1) Key messages to support goal (max 3) Interesting Title Attention Grabbing first slide Key message 1Key message 2Key message 3 Recap and memorable end Questions? Optional Close
  91. 91. A presenter Avoid this…..
  92. 92. Features and benefits, WIIFM? • A feature is worthless unless the customer sees it as valuable • Too many presentations talk about features and don’t explain the benefits for the listeners • It’s not enough to give the facts, you have to tell the audience why the facts matter to them.
  93. 93. Making it personal beats giving the facts  "It's hard for humans to generate feelings toward statistics."  Ask yourself- what feelings will be generated by my messages?
  94. 94. Signposting- helping them navigate through your message Presentation skills Goal Visuals PerformanceParticipation Early Connection Key messages, structure and content Recap and memorable end
  95. 95. What makes messages stick? Last updated 01 July 2015 96 UnexpectednessSimplicity Concreteness and realism Emotion Story telling Humour
  96. 96. Good Visual Design 01 July 2015 97 Don’t just give the numbers- say what the numbers mean Which chart is easier to understand? Commentary beats uninterpreted data
  97. 97. The CARS Principle  Contrast Repetition Similarity These two elements make items stand out and add interest These two elements give a coherent feel
  98. 98. Interaction – questions and interruptions  Thank the questioner  Check everyone has heard the question  “What do you think ?”  “What do others think?”  Answer the question- if you can- be willing to admit when you don’t know the answer and commit to checking up and confirming later. Never make up an answer about a factual question  Check that you have answered the question.
  99. 99. Recap and memorable finish- Exercise • Looking at the presentation you brought with you, look at the closing slides • How effectively do they recap the key messages of your presentation? • Look at the actual close. How effective is it? Does your presentation end with a bang, or gently fizzle out? • Work with a colleague to get an independent view, and to identify where and how you might improve it.
  100. 100. The Memorable Finish • Great presentations save lives • Don’t be a PowerPoint assassin.
  101. 101. Questions?
  102. 102. Useful links • http://slidesthatrock.com/portfolio/ • http://www.thinkoutsidetheslide.com/ • http://www.slideshare.net/ (a useful source of many good presentations- use the search facility to choose a topic) • Posted on www.slideshare.net/ (use the search line) look up slidesthatrock, Jesse Desjardins and Mike Jeffs. All have excellent advice on presentations • https://thenounproject.com/ A good source for icons to build your own infographics
  103. 103. That’s it!  Thanks for your participation!  See you next time!

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