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 The	
  Future	
  of	
  Privacy	
  |	
  The	
  Emerging	
  View	
  	
  
	
  Insights	
  from	
  Mul0ple	
  Expert	
  Discu...
Context	
  
Privacy	
  was	
  one	
  of	
  the	
  key	
  themes	
  to	
  emerge	
  from	
  the	
  first	
  Future	
  Agenda...
Future	
  Agenda	
  
The	
  Future	
  Agenda	
  is	
  the	
  world’s	
  largest	
  open	
  foresight	
  program	
  	
  
th...
Looking	
  Forwards	
  
Organisa0ons	
  increasingly	
  want	
  to	
  iden0fy	
  and	
  understand	
  
	
  both	
  the	
  ...
Future	
  Agenda	
  1.0	
  Top	
  Insights	
  for	
  2020	
  
From	
  the	
  2010	
  program,	
  52	
  key	
  insights	
  ...
Future	
  Agenda	
  in	
  Numbers	
  
The	
  first	
  Future	
  Agenda	
  programme	
  engaged	
  a	
  wide	
  range	
  of	...
Future	
  Agenda	
  2.0	
  Topics	
  
The	
  second	
  version	
  of	
  the	
  Future	
  Agenda	
  program	
  is	
  taking...
IAPP	
  Partnership	
  
Discussions	
  on	
  the	
  future	
  of	
  privacy	
  were	
  undertaken	
  in	
  partnership	
  ...
The	
  Future	
  of	
  Privacy	
  |	
  The	
  Emerging	
  View	
  	
  
This	
  document	
  provides	
  an	
  overview	
  o...
Six	
  Key	
  Themes	
  
Across	
  the	
  mul0ple	
  discussions,	
  issues	
  related	
  to	
  privacy	
  	
  
seem	
  to...
The	
  Increasing	
  Value	
  of	
  Data	
  
The	
  Increasing	
  Value	
  of	
  Data	
  
As	
  organisa0ons	
  grab	
  more	
  data,	
  it	
  becomes	
  a	
  currency...
Knowing	
  The	
  Unknown	
  
By	
  2020	
  people	
  and	
  connected	
  objects	
  will	
  generate	
  40	
  trillion	
 ...
Value	
  of	
  Data	
  
There	
  is	
  undoubtedly	
  a	
  huge	
  economic	
  incen0ve	
  to	
  generate	
  and	
  collec...
Data	
  Darwinism	
  	
  
Data	
  is	
  a	
  new	
  form	
  of	
  power:	
  Corporate	
  consolida0on	
  places	
  data	
 ...
A	
  Data	
  Marketplace	
  	
  
Data	
  is	
  a	
  currency,	
  it	
  has	
  a	
  value	
  and	
  a	
  price,	
  and	
  t...
Privacy	
  as	
  CompeQQon	
  
Privacy	
  is	
  not	
  about	
  the	
  individual	
  –	
  it	
  is	
  all	
  about	
  the	...
Privacy	
  Visibility	
  
The	
  security	
  industry	
  has	
  been	
  es0mated	
  to	
  be	
  worth	
  $350	
  Billion	
...
Personally	
  Curated	
  Data	
  
‘Personally	
  curated’	
  sources	
  of	
  data	
  will	
  have	
  higher	
  value	
  s...
QuanQfied	
  Value	
  	
  
The	
  power	
  of	
  data	
  is	
  in	
  the	
  hands	
  of	
  those	
  who	
  are	
  able	
  t...
The	
  Changing	
  Nature	
  of	
  Privacy	
  
The	
  Changing	
  Nature	
  of	
  Privacy	
  
More	
  interna0onal	
  frameworks	
  seek	
  to	
  govern	
  the	
  Intern...
Individual	
  Control	
  
New	
  disrup0ve	
  providers	
  are	
  seeking	
  to	
  put	
  the	
  individual	
  in	
  contr...
Public	
  Privacy	
  
The	
  regulated	
  press	
  /	
  unregulated	
  Internet	
  con0nue	
  to	
  push	
  the	
  boundar...
Privacy	
  for	
  the	
  Next	
  GeneraQon	
  
With	
  1/3	
  of	
  Internet	
  users	
  under	
  18,	
  adult	
  regula0o...
Connected	
  PredicQon	
  
Led	
  by	
  healthcare,	
  we	
  move	
  from	
  disparate,	
  under-­‐u0lized	
  data	
  sour...
Diversity	
  of	
  State	
  Powers	
  
As	
  targeted	
  monitoring	
  replaces	
  broad	
  mass-­‐intercep0on,	
  more	
 ...
The	
  Many	
  Faces	
  of	
  Privacy	
  
Different	
  interpreta0ons	
  of	
  privacy,	
  many	
  from	
  different	
  cult...
Data	
  Ownership	
  
Data	
  Ownership	
  
Individuals	
  recognize	
  the	
  value	
  of	
  their	
  digital	
  shadows,	
  privacy	
  agents	...
MiData	
  
In	
  the	
  future,	
  customers	
  will	
  retain	
  full	
  ownership	
  of	
  their	
  own	
  consumer	
  d...
Data	
  Curators	
  
Personal	
  Informa0on	
  Managers	
  grow	
  in	
  number	
  and	
  seek	
  to	
  manage	
  	
  
and...
Masters	
  of	
  Our	
  Data	
  
In	
  2025	
  there	
  will	
  be	
  a	
  seamless	
  border	
  between	
  digital	
  and...
Personal	
  Data	
  Store	
  
Led	
  by	
  developments	
  in	
  authen0ca0on	
  systems,	
  new	
  personal	
  data	
  pl...
Owning	
  Your	
  Digital	
  Shadow	
  
Consumers	
  are	
  increasingly	
  aware	
  of	
  the	
  value	
  of	
  their	
  ...
CiQzen-­‐centric	
  Data	
  	
  
Some	
  see	
  the	
  inevitability	
  of	
  a	
  ci0zen-­‐centric	
  data	
  eco-­‐syste...
ShiZing	
  Public	
  PercepQons	
  
ShiZing	
  Public	
  PercepQons	
  
Privacy	
  becomes	
  a	
  mainstream	
  issue	
  with	
  ci0zens	
  more	
  aware	
  ...
Privacy	
  is	
  a	
  Public	
  Issue	
  
The	
  public’s	
  percep0on	
  of	
  the	
  threats	
  to	
  privacy,	
  person...
Growing	
  Distrust	
  
Growing	
  awareness	
  and	
  distrust	
  will	
  increasingly	
  become	
  a	
  factor	
  in	
  ...
Data-­‐conscious	
  CiQzens	
  	
  
The	
  need	
  for	
  ci0zens	
  to	
  understand	
  how	
  data	
  is	
  used	
  will...
Data	
  ExploitaQon	
  
If	
  it	
  is	
  discovered	
  that	
  companies	
  exploit	
  data	
  that	
  has	
  been	
  col...
ShiZing	
  Power	
  To	
  The	
  Individual	
  
This	
  poten0al	
  for	
  economic	
  disrup0on	
  to	
  come	
  to	
  th...
Informed	
  Consent	
  
Given	
  complex	
  data	
  flows,	
  informed	
  consent	
  is	
  increasingly	
  challenging	
  –...
Privacy	
  as	
  a	
  Luxury	
  
The	
  right	
  to	
  privacy	
  becomes	
  more	
  difficult	
  to	
  enforce,	
  but	
  t...
Privacy	
  EducaQon	
  Race	
  
Programmes	
  of	
  ‘privacy	
  educa0on’	
  emerge	
  to	
  combat	
  mass-­‐desensi0sa0o...
Managing	
  Data	
  Risk	
  
Managing	
  Data	
  Risk	
  
In	
  an	
  increasingly	
  connected	
  world,	
  risks	
  also	
  rise.	
  Protec0on	
  aga...
Data	
  ProtecQon	
  
Protec0on	
  against	
  hackers	
  remains	
  weak	
  with	
  security	
  so^ware	
  con0nuously	
  ...
Rising	
  Cyber	
  Security	
  
Greater	
  interconnec0vity	
  and	
  the	
  Internet	
  of	
  Things	
  creates	
  new	
 ...
Broader	
  Cyber	
  Terrorism	
  
Cyber	
  aKacks	
  move	
  from	
  the	
  virtual	
  world	
  to	
  the	
  physical	
  -...
Data	
  Criminality	
  	
  
Data	
  becomes	
  the	
  currency	
  of	
  criminal	
  opportunity	
  -­‐	
  which	
  support...
Privacy	
  Agents	
  
The	
  difficul0es	
  in	
  extrac0ng	
  value	
  from	
  our	
  data	
  while	
  protec0ng	
  our	
  ...
Security	
  vs.	
  Convenience	
  	
  
The	
  balance	
  between	
  convenience	
  and	
  security	
  with	
  border	
  co...
Privacy	
  Crimes:	
  Data	
  Hostages	
  
Criminals	
  have	
  always	
  invaded	
  privacy,	
  but	
  new	
  threats	
  ...
Data	
  Risk	
  Management	
  
As	
  privacy	
  and	
  data	
  are	
  subsumed	
  within	
  wider	
  risk	
  frameworks,	
...
The	
  Rise	
  of	
  Machines	
  	
  
The	
  growth	
  in	
  the	
  intelligence	
  and	
  capabili0es	
  of	
  machines	
...
To	
  Have	
  and	
  To	
  Hold	
  
Porous	
  access	
  controls	
  and	
  the	
  risk	
  of	
  future	
  liabili0es	
  hi...
Under	
  the	
  Skin	
  
As	
  wearables	
  and	
  implants	
  become	
  commonplace	
  and	
  workforces	
  are	
  
freel...
Technology	
  to	
  the	
  Rescue	
  
The	
  machines	
  will	
  help	
  us	
  manage	
  our	
  privacy:	
  Technology	
  ...
New	
  Models	
  and	
  Behaviours	
  
New	
  Models	
  and	
  Behaviours	
  
From	
  the	
  shi^s	
  seen	
  to	
  be	
  taking	
  place,	
  there	
  are	
  a	
...
New	
  Models	
  and	
  Behaviours	
  -­‐	
  Social	
  ImplicaQons	
  
New	
  Models	
  and	
  Behaviours	
  –	
  Social	
  ImplicaQons	
  
With	
  more	
  open	
  data	
  generated	
  by	
  go...
Paying	
  for	
  Privacy	
  	
  
We	
  do	
  not	
  currently	
  understand	
  the	
  value	
  of	
  our	
  data	
  or	
  ...
Sharing	
  Secrets	
  
In	
  exchange	
  for	
  beKer	
  service	
  or	
  an	
  improved	
  quality	
  of	
  life,	
  	
  ...
Securing	
  Sustainable	
  Society	
  
The	
  benefits	
  of	
  making	
  data	
  open,	
  especially	
  for	
  solving	
  ...
Public	
  Data	
  
	
  Economically	
  connected	
  data	
  can	
  play	
  a	
  significant	
  role	
  that	
  will	
  bene...
The	
  Third	
  Space	
  for	
  Data	
  	
  
By	
  2025,	
  a	
  new	
  place	
  for	
  data	
  emerges	
  -­‐	
  between	...
Data	
  and	
  Democracy	
  
Many	
  ques0on	
  whether	
  privacy	
  will	
  enable	
  the	
  democra0c	
  process:	
  Is...
Living	
  in	
  Glass	
  Houses	
  
If	
  we	
  get	
  it	
  right,	
  we	
  will	
  be	
  more	
  comfortable	
  to	
  me...
The	
  Privacy	
  Illusion	
  
There	
  is	
  a	
  rising	
  general	
  belief	
  in	
  the	
  right	
  to	
  data	
  priv...
OrganisaQonal	
  ImplicaQons	
  
New	
  Models	
  and	
  Behaviours	
  –	
  OrganisaQonal	
  ImplicaQons	
  
As	
  privacy	
  becomes	
  ever	
  more	
  pr...
Data	
  Ethics	
  and	
  Trust	
  
As	
  trust	
  increasingly	
  drives	
  success,	
  organisa0ons	
  will	
  seek	
  to...
Digital	
  Commons	
  
The	
  ‘digital	
  commons’	
  will	
  con0nue	
  to	
  grow,	
  empowering	
  more	
  and	
  more	...
I,	
  Robot	
  
We	
  will	
  see	
  urgent	
  debate	
  on	
  the	
  accountability	
  and	
  ethicacy	
  of	
  machines	...
Global	
  vs.	
  Local	
  
Technology	
  is	
  by	
  its	
  very	
  nature	
  global	
  and	
  data	
  does	
  not	
  resp...
Linkability	
  of	
  Open	
  Data	
  
No	
  data	
  will	
  be	
  truly	
  anonymous:	
  Current	
  open	
  data	
  prac0c...
Data	
  Impurity	
  
As	
  more	
  decisions	
  are	
  made	
  with	
  reference	
  to	
  Big	
  Data	
  analysis	
  -­‐	
...
Legal	
  ImplicaQons	
  
New	
  Models	
  and	
  Behaviours	
  -­‐	
  Legal	
  ImplicaQons	
  
	
  The	
  push	
  towards	
  global	
  standards,	
...
Corporate	
  Self-­‐RegulaQon	
  
Faced	
  with	
  greater	
  regula0on	
  of	
  data	
  use	
  and	
  more	
  pressure	
 ...
Stronger	
  RegulaQon	
  
Regula0on	
  will	
  get	
  tougher:	
  Policy	
  makers	
  will	
  act	
  to	
  toughen	
  	
  ...
Patchwork	
  LegislaQon	
  
A	
  diversity	
  of	
  regula0on	
  and	
  standards	
  from	
  state	
  to	
  state	
  con0n...
Privacy	
  Rights	
  
We	
  see	
  more	
  robust	
  privacy	
  rights	
  beKer	
  suited	
  to	
  the	
  digital	
  age.	...
Crypto-­‐Anarchists	
  	
  
Considera0on	
  is	
  increasingly	
  given	
  to	
  empowering	
  totalitarianism	
  through	...
Agreement	
  on	
  Use	
  Not	
  CollecQon	
  
The	
  best	
  approach	
  to	
  future	
  proof	
  access	
  to	
  big	
  ...
Global	
  Privacy	
  Treaty	
  
As	
  different	
  regions	
  all	
  seek	
  to	
  progress	
  data	
  regula0on	
  via	
  ...
Data	
  Islands	
  
Some	
  economies	
  seek	
  to	
  maintain	
  closed	
  or	
  parallel	
  networks,	
  independent	
 ...
Some	
  QuesQons	
  
Some	
  QuesQons	
  
From	
  these	
  discussions	
  on	
  and	
  around	
  the	
  future	
  of	
  privacy,	
  there	
  se...
Future	
  Agenda	
  
84	
  Brook	
  Street	
  
London	
  
W1K	
  5EH	
  
+44	
  203	
  0088	
  141	
  
futureagenda.org	
 ...
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Future of Privacy - The Emerging View 11 06 15

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The Future of Privacy is one of 25 topics being explored around the world by the Future Agenda project. 4 events, run in partnership with the IAPP in Washington DC, London, Singapore and Toronto have built on an initial view by Stephen Deadman, formerly Chief Privacy Officer at Vodafone and now at Facebook. With the extra insights from these events, and others from other topics such as the future of data, travel and work, we now have an updated emerging view of some the key shifts seen to be taking place around the world. The PDF brings together some of the key insights gained to date and shares some thoughts on the underlying shifts. It is the first of several presentations sharing insights from the Future Agenda programme.

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Future of Privacy - The Emerging View 11 06 15

  1. 1.  The  Future  of  Privacy  |  The  Emerging  View      Insights  from  Mul0ple  Expert  Discussions  Around  the  World  
  2. 2. Context   Privacy  was  one  of  the  key  themes  to  emerge  from  the  first  Future  Agenda   programme  in  2010.  Since  then,  it  has  grown  in  recogni0on,  focus  and     concern  for  a  wide  range  of  individuals,  organisa0ons  and  governments.  
  3. 3. Future  Agenda   The  Future  Agenda  is  the  world’s  largest  open  foresight  program     that  accesses  mul0ple  views  of  the  next  decade     so  all  can  be  beKer  informed  and  s0mulate  innova0on.  
  4. 4. Looking  Forwards   Organisa0ons  increasingly  want  to  iden0fy  and  understand    both  the  an0cipated  and  unexpected  changes     so  that  they  can  be  beKer  prepared  for  the  future.  
  5. 5. Future  Agenda  1.0  Top  Insights  for  2020   From  the  2010  program,  52  key  insights  on  the  next  decade  were  shared   widely  and  have  been  extensively  used  by  organisa0ons  around  the  world.   Privacy  was  a  key  issue  to  emerge  in  2010  and  has  grown  since.  
  6. 6. Future  Agenda  in  Numbers   The  first  Future  Agenda  programme  engaged  a  wide  range  of  views  in    25  countries.  Future  Agenda  2.0  has  doubled  the  face-­‐to-­‐face  interac0on     and  significantly  raised  online  sharing,  debate  and  discussion.   Future  Agenda  1.0     1  HOST   16  TOPICS   25  COUNTRIES   50  WORKSHOPS   1500  ORGANISATIONS   Future  Agenda  2.0     50  HOSTS   25  TOPICS   40  COUNTRIES   100  WORKSHOPS   2500  ORGANISATIONS  
  7. 7. Future  Agenda  2.0  Topics   The  second  version  of  the  Future  Agenda  program  is  taking  place     during  2015  and  has  been  addressing  20  topics  via  100  events  in    50  ci0es  in  40  countries  in  partnerhship  with  around  50  core  hosts.   Ageing   CiQes   Company   ConnecQvity   Data   EducaQon   Energy   Food   Government   Health   Learning   Loyalty   Payments   Privacy   Resources   Transport   Travel   Water   Wealth   Work  
  8. 8. IAPP  Partnership   Discussions  on  the  future  of  privacy  were  undertaken  in  partnership  with  the   IAPP.  Events  in  the  US,  UK,  Singapore  and  Canada  plus  insights  from  topics     such  as  the  future  of  data  have  all  added  more  views  from  around  the  world.     Ini0al   Perspec0ves   Q4  2014   Global   Discussions   Q1/2  2015   Insight   Synthesis   Q3  2015   Sharing     Output   Q4  2015  
  9. 9. The  Future  of  Privacy  |  The  Emerging  View     This  document  provides  an  overview  of  what  we  heard  from  mul0ple  expert   voices  around  the  world  –  on  the  future  of  privacy,  how  it  is  changing,  what  is   driving  this  change  and  how  it  may  evolve  over  the  next  decade.  
  10. 10. Six  Key  Themes   Across  the  mul0ple  discussions,  issues  related  to  privacy     seem  to  be  touching  upon  and  connec0ng  with  six  underlying,     and  interwoven,  themes  with  different  emphasis  in  different  countries.   The   Increasing   Value  of   Data   Data   Ownership   Changing   Nature  of   Privacy   Shi^ing   Public   Percep0ons   Managing     Data  Risk   New   Models  and   Behaviours  
  11. 11. The  Increasing  Value  of  Data  
  12. 12. The  Increasing  Value  of  Data   As  organisa0ons  grab  more  data,  it  becomes  a  currency  with  a  value  and  a   price:  It  therefore  requires  marketplaces  –  transparent  ecosystems  for  trading   data  -­‐  so  anything  that  is  informa0on  is  represented  in  data  marketplaces.  
  13. 13. Knowing  The  Unknown   By  2020  people  and  connected  objects  will  generate  40  trillion  gigabytes  of   data  that  will  have  an  impact  on  daily  life  in  one  way  or  another.  This  data  will   make  known  about  us  things  that  were  previously  unknown  or  unknowable.  
  14. 14. Value  of  Data   There  is  undoubtedly  a  huge  economic  incen0ve  to  generate  and  collect  data   from  whatever  sources  it  becomes  available.  As  more  data  from  more  things   becomes  available,  we  can  expect  to  see  a  data  “land  grab”  by  organisa0ons.    
  15. 15. Data  Darwinism     Data  is  a  new  form  of  power:  Corporate  consolida0on  places  data  in  the     hands  of  a  few  who  are  able  to  dictate  terms  above  others.  Governments   correspondingly  have  less  power  as  they  have  less  access  to  key  data.  
  16. 16. A  Data  Marketplace     Data  is  a  currency,  it  has  a  value  and  a  price,  and  therefore  requires  a     market  place.  An  ecosystem  for  trading  data  is  emerging  and  anything     that  is  informa0on  is  represented  in  a  new  data  marketplace.    
  17. 17. Privacy  as  CompeQQon   Privacy  is  not  about  the  individual  –  it  is  all  about  the  value  of  data.     Therefore  we  will  see  increasing  data  fragmenta0on  as  companies  seek     to  use  data  for  compe00ve  advantage  and  create  new  barriers  to  entry.  
  18. 18. Privacy  Visibility   The  security  industry  has  been  es0mated  to  be  worth  $350  Billion  in     the  US  alone;  security  is  a  sophis0cated  and  maturing  market.     The  ‘privacy  industry’  by  contrast  is  hardly  recognizable  at  all.    
  19. 19. Personally  Curated  Data   ‘Personally  curated’  sources  of  data  will  have  higher  value  simply  due  to  the   fact  that  they  will  represent  the  actual  wishes  and  desires  of  an  individual,   rather  than  the  presumed  wishes  and  desires  based  on  derived  data.    
  20. 20. QuanQfied  Value     The  power  of  data  is  in  the  hands  of  those  who  are  able  to  organise  it.     But  who  will  be  able  to  define  what  is  fully  accurate  and  true     informa0on  before  it  can  be  quan0fied  and  therefore  have  value?      
  21. 21. The  Changing  Nature  of  Privacy  
  22. 22. The  Changing  Nature  of  Privacy   More  interna0onal  frameworks  seek  to  govern  the  Internet,  protect  the   vulnerable  and  secure  personal  data:  The  balance  between  government   protec0on,  security,  personal  privacy  and  public  good  is  a  poli0cal  issue.  
  23. 23. Individual  Control   New  disrup0ve  providers  are  seeking  to  put  the  individual  in  control  of     their  personal  data.  In  the  process,  they  are  seeking  to  dis-­‐intermediate     data-­‐intensive  businesses  from  their  exis0ng  sources  of  data.    
  24. 24. Public  Privacy   The  regulated  press  /  unregulated  Internet  con0nue  to  push  the  boundaries  of   informa0on  sharing:  Everyone’s  personal  informa0on  is  in  the  public  domain,   but  there  are  differing  cultural  expecta0ons  about  what  cons0tutes  privacy.    
  25. 25. Privacy  for  the  Next  GeneraQon   With  1/3  of  Internet  users  under  18,  adult  regula0on  struggles  to  protect  the   young  while  giving  them  authen0c  expression.  In-­‐built  defaults  and   sophis0cated  assessments  seek  to  mi0gate  risk  but  with  no  major  shi^.  
  26. 26. Connected  PredicQon   Led  by  healthcare,  we  move  from  disparate,  under-­‐u0lized  data  sources  to   real-­‐0me  synthesis  of  mul0ple  data  plalorms  with  improved  accuracy  and   speed.  Predic0ve  analy0cs  drives  hyper-­‐personaliza0on  and  early  ac0on.  
  27. 27. Diversity  of  State  Powers   As  targeted  monitoring  replaces  broad  mass-­‐intercep0on,  more  prevalent  and   robust  collec0on  of  personal  data  by  states  in  many  regions  is  increasingly   subject  to  interna0onal  security  frameworks.  But  others  do  not  comply.  
  28. 28. The  Many  Faces  of  Privacy   Different  interpreta0ons  of  privacy,  many  from  different  cultures,  challenge   exis0ng  models.  Global  frameworks  may  become  more  consistent  while   implementa0ons  are  localised  and  diverse,  making  'privacy  borders'  a  reality.  
  29. 29. Data  Ownership  
  30. 30. Data  Ownership   Individuals  recognize  the  value  of  their  digital  shadows,  privacy  agents  and   data  brokers  curate  clients’  data  while  personal  data  stores  give  us  control  of   our  informa0on:  We  retain  more  ownership  of  data  and  opt  to  share  it.  
  31. 31. MiData   In  the  future,  customers  will  retain  full  ownership  of  their  own  consumer  data   in  machine-­‐readable  format,  which  they  then  opt  to  share  with  merchants.   Some  customers  will  hire  ‘personal  data  managers’  to  make  this  easy.  
  32. 32. Data  Curators   Personal  Informa0on  Managers  grow  in  number  and  seek  to  manage     and  protect  both  ‘free’  individual  data  sets  and  aggregated  data:     “If  you  are  not  paying  for  a  product,  you  are  the  product.”  
  33. 33. Masters  of  Our  Data   In  2025  there  will  be  a  seamless  border  between  digital  and  real  where    the  digital  truth  becomes  the  real  truth.  We  should  increase  awareness     of  our  digital  shadow  becoming  ‘masters  of  our  data’.  
  34. 34. Personal  Data  Store   Led  by  developments  in  authen0ca0on  systems,  new  personal  data  plalorms   migrate  into  the  world  of  marke0ng.  These  lead  to  seamless  and  universally   accepted  creden0als  stores  that  share  data  with  mul0ple  brand  partners.  
  35. 35. Owning  Your  Digital  Shadow   Consumers  are  increasingly  aware  of  the  value  of  their     digital  footprints.  This  drives  the  desire  for  greater  control  of     personal  data,  balancing  convenience  and  benefit.  
  36. 36. CiQzen-­‐centric  Data     Some  see  the  inevitability  of  a  ci0zen-­‐centric  data  eco-­‐system  that  empowers   individuals  with  control  and  visibility  over  all  data  created  by,  or  impac0ng  on,   them,  including  data  a^er  life  –  the  onward  usage  of  inherited  data.  
  37. 37. ShiZing  Public  PercepQons  
  38. 38. ShiZing  Public  PercepQons   Privacy  becomes  a  mainstream  issue  with  ci0zens  more  aware  of  how  their     data  is  being  used.  What  is  private  and  what  is  public  blurs  but  many  seek     to  have  greater  influence  over  how  their  data  is  collected  and  used.  
  39. 39. Privacy  is  a  Public  Issue   The  public’s  percep0on  of  the  threats  to  privacy,  personal  freedom     and  autonomy  is  growing.  Privacy  has  already  emerged  beyond  a     niche,  specialist  concern  to  being  a  mainstream  public  issue.    
  40. 40. Growing  Distrust   Growing  awareness  and  distrust  will  increasingly  become  a  factor  in     decision  making  for  ordinary  people  –  decisions  about  the  products  we  use     or  abandon,  the  brands  we  associate  with,  the  poli0cal  leaders  we  elect.  
  41. 41. Data-­‐conscious  CiQzens     The  need  for  ci0zens  to  understand  how  data  is  used  will  grow.  Educa0on  will   be  needed  to  combat  new  inequali0es,  and  enable  people  to  fully  take  part  in   society:  understanding  data  will  become  part  of  civic  self-­‐consciousness.  
  42. 42. Data  ExploitaQon   If  it  is  discovered  that  companies  exploit  data  that  has  been  collected  without   genuine  permission  and  use  it  in  ways  that  have  no  societal  benefit  there  is  a   risk  that  a  nega0ve  public  response  will  limit  opportuni0es  for  everyone.  
  43. 43. ShiZing  Power  To  The  Individual   This  poten0al  for  economic  disrup0on  to  come  to  the  aid  of  privacy     by  shi^ing  power  over  data  from  the  organisa0on  to  the   individual  is  one  of  the  most  significant  emerging  trends.  
  44. 44. Informed  Consent   Given  complex  data  flows,  informed  consent  is  increasingly  challenging  –     so  an  alterna0ve  is  needed:  An  accountability  governance  model  incorpora0ng   ethics  and  respeclul  data  use  is  a  compelling  subs0tute  or  complement.  
  45. 45. Privacy  as  a  Luxury   The  right  to  privacy  becomes  more  difficult  to  enforce,  but  the  wealthy   con0nue  to  take  ac0on  when  informa0on  is  misused.  Privacy  could  be  a  luxury   in  the  near  term  –  but  may  become  more  widely  available  in  the  longer  term.  
  46. 46. Privacy  EducaQon  Race   Programmes  of  ‘privacy  educa0on’  emerge  to  combat  mass-­‐desensi0sa0on  to   the  sharing  of  private  data.  However  this  will  not  prevent  ‘privacy  coronaries’    –  the  result  of  returning  to  bad  habits  a^er  privacy  viola0ons.  
  47. 47. Managing  Data  Risk  
  48. 48. Managing  Data  Risk   In  an  increasingly  connected  world,  risks  also  rise.  Protec0on  against  hacking,     cyber-­‐aKacks,  fraud,  counterfei0ng  all  drive  greater  security,  data  management     and  regula0on  -­‐  but  this  is  balanced  by  the  pull  of  convenience  and  data  sharing.    
  49. 49. Data  ProtecQon   Protec0on  against  hackers  remains  weak  with  security  so^ware  con0nuously   behind  the  curve.  Wider  concerns  have  been  raised  by  mass  surveillance  and  a   growing  number  of  countries  now  see  cyber  space  as  a  new  stage  for  baKle.  
  50. 50. Rising  Cyber  Security   Greater  interconnec0vity  and  the  Internet  of  Things  creates  new     vulnerabili0es  for  governments  and  corpora0ons  -­‐  as  the  unscrupulous  and     the  criminal  increasingly  seek  to  exploit  weakness  and  destroy  systems.  
  51. 51. Broader  Cyber  Terrorism   Cyber  aKacks  move  from  the  virtual  world  to  the  physical  -­‐  aKacking  planes,     u0li0es  and  industrial  systems.  Some  see  a  corresponding  slow  down  in     the  adop0on  of  sensors  and  wider  use  of  private  encryp0on  technologies.    
  52. 52. Data  Criminality     Data  becomes  the  currency  of  criminal  opportunity  -­‐  which  supports,  feeds  and   innovates  opera0ons  such  as  human  trafficking,  fraud,  counterfeit,  drugs,   pros0tu0on,  and  paedophilia  –  thus  blurring  the  vision  of  an  open  data  utopia.  
  53. 53. Privacy  Agents   The  difficul0es  in  extrac0ng  value  from  our  data  while  protec0ng  our  privacy   sees  the  emergence  of  new  professions.  Look  out  for  ‘privacy  agents’  and     ‘data  brokers’  ac0ng  as  intermediaries  and  managing  the  flow  of  our  data.  
  54. 54. Security  vs.  Convenience     The  balance  between  convenience  and  security  with  border  controls  coming   under  increasing  strain  as  they  deal  with  huge  volumes  of  people  travelling   interna0onally  at  a  0me  when  fears  around  global  security  are  high.  
  55. 55. Privacy  Crimes:  Data  Hostages   Criminals  have  always  invaded  privacy,  but  new  threats  emerge  as  our  digital   selves  increasingly  become  poten0ally  valuable  hostages.  Stronger  privacy   rights  will  need  to  be  backed  by  knowledge  of  where  we  are  most  vulnerable.  
  56. 56. Data  Risk  Management   As  privacy  and  data  are  subsumed  within  wider  risk  frameworks,     greater  self-­‐regula0on  and  more  in-­‐house  data  risk  management  will    lead  to  deeper  integra0on  of  engineering,  privacy  and  policy.  
  57. 57. The  Rise  of  Machines     The  growth  in  the  intelligence  and  capabili0es  of  machines  presents  both  a   threat  and  an  opportunity:  Greater  AI  and  automa0on  free  up  0me,  but  also   threaten  jobs  -­‐  both  low  skilled  and  managerial  /  administra0ve  roles.      
  58. 58. To  Have  and  To  Hold   Porous  access  controls  and  the  risk  of  future  liabili0es  highlight  to     many  that  there  is  benefit  in  destroying  data  that  is  not  needed     –  especially  HR,  customer  and  pricing  informa0on.  
  59. 59. Under  the  Skin   As  wearables  and  implants  become  commonplace  and  workforces  are   freelance  and  porlolio-­‐based,  the  ability  of  organisa0ons  to  own  or  control   corporate  informa0on  held  on  personal  devices  is  significantly  diminished.    
  60. 60. Technology  to  the  Rescue   The  machines  will  help  us  manage  our  privacy:  Technology  will     enable  people  to  protect  themselves  and  killer  apps  will  let  people     collect  and  share  their  data  for  the  ‘public  good’.  
  61. 61. New  Models  and  Behaviours  
  62. 62. New  Models  and  Behaviours   From  the  shi^s  seen  to  be  taking  place,  there  are  a  number  of  new  models     and  behavious  emerging:  These  fall  into  the  three  interconnected  spheres     of  poten0al  change  in  social,  organisa0onal  and  legal  norms.     Social   Organisa0onal   Legal  
  63. 63. New  Models  and  Behaviours  -­‐  Social  ImplicaQons  
  64. 64. New  Models  and  Behaviours  –  Social  ImplicaQons   With  more  open  data  generated  by  governments,  individuals  and   organisa0ons,  many  focus  resources  on  combining  and  mining  disparate  data   sets  to  highlight  and  act  on  opportuni0es  for  posi0ve  social  change.    
  65. 65. Paying  for  Privacy     We  do  not  currently  understand  the  value  of  our  data  or  how  it  is     being  used  and  so  are  giving  it  away.  In  the  future  we  might  be  willing     to  pay  more  for  our  privacy  than  the  data  we  share.    
  66. 66. Sharing  Secrets   In  exchange  for  beKer  service  or  an  improved  quality  of  life,     we  increasingly  recognise  exactly  what  personal  informa0on     we  are  prepared  to  share  and  who  to  share  it  with.  
  67. 67. Securing  Sustainable  Society   The  benefits  of  making  data  open,  especially  for  solving  some  of  society’s   greatest  problems,  will  drive  governments  to  insist  that  certain  private  data   sets  are  made  public,  democra0sing  data-­‐use  and  driving  social  innova0on.    
  68. 68. Public  Data    Economically  connected  data  can  play  a  significant  role  that  will  benefit  not   only  private  commerce  but  also  na0onal  economies  and  their  ci0zens.  Analysis   can  provide  the  public  sector  with  a  new  world  of  performance  poten0al.    
  69. 69. The  Third  Space  for  Data     By  2025,  a  new  place  for  data  emerges  -­‐  between  public  and  private.  This  is   driven  by  "data  philanthropy"  and  the  dona0on  of  data  for  social  purposes   such  as  healthcare  and  improving  our  ability  to  respond  to  disasters.  
  70. 70. Data  and  Democracy   Many  ques0on  whether  privacy  will  enable  the  democra0c  process:  Is  there   privacy  without  democracy?  Ci0zen  data  is  increasingly  publicly  used  and   shared  by  governments  as  an  instrument  of  social  change.  
  71. 71. Living  in  Glass  Houses   If  we  get  it  right,  we  will  be  more  comfortable  to  metaphorically  ‘live  in  a  glass   house’,  allowing  our  personal  informa0on  to  be  widely  accessible  in  return  for   the  understanding  that  this  enables  a  richer,  more  ‘aKuned’  life  as  a  result.  
  72. 72. The  Privacy  Illusion   There  is  a  rising  general  belief  in  the  right  to  data  privacy  and  the  right     to  data  security.  Both  are  illusions:  Security  is  impossible  without     increased  monitoring  -­‐  and  so  true  privacy  is  also  impossible.  
  73. 73. OrganisaQonal  ImplicaQons  
  74. 74. New  Models  and  Behaviours  –  OrganisaQonal  ImplicaQons   As  privacy  becomes  ever  more  present  in  the  corporate  risk  profile,  trust     is  ever  more  easily  lost.  Being  proac0ve  in  dialogue  with  both  regulators     and  the  public  becomes  a  priority  for  many  leading  organisa0ons.  
  75. 75. Data  Ethics  and  Trust   As  trust  increasingly  drives  success,  organisa0ons  will  seek  to  make  data  ethics   a  focus.  In  order  to  engage  and  gain  buy-­‐in  from  governments  and  consumers   alike,  trust  in  data  usage  will  become  a  core  plalorm  for  differen0a0on.  
  76. 76. Digital  Commons   The  ‘digital  commons’  will  con0nue  to  grow,  empowering  more  and  more   ci0zens  and  consumers  to  take  maKers  into  their  own  hands,  such  as  deploying   end-­‐to-­‐end  encryp0on,  anonymizers  and  by  “watching  the  watchers”.      
  77. 77. I,  Robot   We  will  see  urgent  debate  on  the  accountability  and  ethicacy  of  machines  and   systems  making  autonomous  decisions,  using  our  data.  Solu0ons  will  have   profound  implica0ons  for  the  development  of  data-­‐driven  technologies.  
  78. 78. Global  vs.  Local   Technology  is  by  its  very  nature  global  and  data  does  not  respect  na0onal   boundaries.  Can  na0on  states  con0nue  to  set  the  rules  or  will  tension  in  global   interoperability  drive  us  to  design  for  global  standards  but  with  localised  use?  
  79. 79. Linkability  of  Open  Data   No  data  will  be  truly  anonymous:  Current  open  data  prac0ce  assumes  that   technology  will  be  not  be  able  to  relink  it  to  its  source.  This  is  not  the    case  and  so,  by  2025,  we  will  see  different  levels  of  de-­‐iden0fica0on.    
  80. 80. Data  Impurity   As  more  decisions  are  made  with  reference  to  Big  Data  analysis  -­‐  the  ques0on   of  if  data  is  well  collected,  or  manipulated,  will  become  more  important.  ‘Data   standards’  will  emerge  to  cope  with  growing  complexity  of  merging  data  sets.  
  81. 81. Legal  ImplicaQons  
  82. 82. New  Models  and  Behaviours  -­‐  Legal  ImplicaQons    The  push  towards  global  standards,  protocols  and  greater  transparency     is  a  focus  for  many  na0ons,  but  others  choose  to  opt-­‐out  of     interna0onal  agreements  and  go  their  own  way.  
  83. 83. Corporate  Self-­‐RegulaQon   Faced  with  greater  regula0on  of  data  use  and  more  pressure  from  the  boKom   up,  companies  are  increasingly  open  about  their  ac0vi0es  –  within  limits.   Greater  transparency  is  valued  but  seeing  the  real  truth  is  s0ll  a  challenge.  
  84. 84. Stronger  RegulaQon   Regula0on  will  get  tougher:  Policy  makers  will  act  to  toughen     laws,  even  though  they  move  at  geological  speeds     compared  to  the  rate  of  technology  development.  
  85. 85. Patchwork  LegislaQon   A  diversity  of  regula0on  and  standards  from  state  to  state  con0nues  to     restrict  policing  and  provide  opportuni0es  for  exploita0on.  But  cross-­‐border   trust  and  coopera0on  will  s0ll  present  barriers  for  many  na0ons.  
  86. 86. Privacy  Rights   We  see  more  robust  privacy  rights  beKer  suited  to  the  digital  age.  These  may   include  rights  to  anonymity  and  personal  data  ownership,  but  also  innova0ve   rights  to  ‘digital  self-­‐determina0on’  or  ‘the  right  to  change  our  minds’.  
  87. 87. Crypto-­‐Anarchists     Considera0on  is  increasingly  given  to  empowering  totalitarianism  through   surveillance  to  help  deal  with  crypto-­‐anarchists.  Totalitarian  surveillance  is   seen  as  par0cularly  necessary  as  emerging  economies  drive  rapid  change.  
  88. 88. Agreement  on  Use  Not  CollecQon   The  best  approach  to  future  proof  access  to  big  data  is  to  ensure  there  is   agreement  around  its  use,  not  its  collec0on.  We  need  a  core  reference  dataset   to  iden0fy  the  data  that  is  most  effec0ve  in  driving  social  and  economic  gain.    
  89. 89. Global  Privacy  Treaty   As  different  regions  all  seek  to  progress  data  regula0on  via  the  likes  of  APEC   and  the  EU,  the  emergence  of  a  global  privacy  framework  is  championed  by   those  looking  for  control  and  transparency:  A  Geneva  Conven0on  for  privacy?  
  90. 90. Data  Islands   Some  economies  seek  to  maintain  closed  or  parallel  networks,  independent  of   global  systems.  Different  approaches  from  the  standard  are  developed  for   major  popula0on  centres  and,  in  0me,  could  have  global  reach.  
  91. 91. Some  QuesQons  
  92. 92. Some  QuesQons   From  these  discussions  on  and  around  the  future  of  privacy,  there  seems  to     be  a  number  of  key  ques0ons  to  be  addressed  by  governments,  companies     and  individuals  –  some  global  and  some  more  local  or  regional  in  focus.   1.  Will  we  find  and  agree  common  approaches  for  data  collec0on  and  use  globally,  or  will   regional  and  na0onal  priori0es  be  the  norm  for  coopera0on  for  the  next  decade?   2.  As  the  public  recogni0on  of  the  ownership  and  value  of  data  increases,  will  we  share  more   or  less  about  ourselves  in  2025  ?   3.  If  everything  is  truly  connected  and  machines  and  algorythms  make  more  decisions,  how   will  ethics  and  judgment  of  risk  be  applied  -­‐  and  who  will  do  the  coding?   4.  Will  we  s0ll  be  talking  about  privacy  in  10  years  0me,  or  will  we  have  evolved  our   understanding  and  separated  out  how  we  see  security,  data  ownership  and  insight?  
  93. 93. Future  Agenda   84  Brook  Street   London   W1K  5EH   +44  203  0088  141   futureagenda.org   The  world’s  leading  open  foresight  program   What  do  you  think?   Join  In  |  Add  your  views  into  the  mix     www.futureagenda.org  

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