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What is a lyric poem
What is a lyric poem
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Lyric genre

  1. 1. Lyric Genre TEACHER FERNANDO AVALOS UVM
  2. 2. LYRIC ◦ A type of brief poem that expresses the personal emotions and thoughts of a single speaker or describes something. ◦ It is important to realize that the lyric is in the first person (“I”), the speaker is not necessarily the poet. ◦ The lyrics includes all the shorter forms of poetry: sonnet, elegy, ode, ballad, song. ◦ The subject matter is expressive, whether of personal emotions, such as love or grief, or of public emotions, such as patriotism or reverence or celebration. troubadour
  3. 3. POETRY ◦ From the Latin “poeta”(a poet), is a form of literary art in which language is used for its aesthetic and evocative qualities in addition to its apparent meaning. ◦ Poetry may be written independently, as discrete poems, or may occur in conjunction with other arts, as in poetic drama, hymns, lyrics or prose poetry. ◦ Poetry often uses particular forms and conventions to suggest alternative meanings in the words, or to evoke emotional or sensual responses. ◦ Some forms of poetry are specific to particular cultures and genres, responding to the characteristics of the language in which the poet writes.
  4. 4. ◦ From the point of view of the Lyric, the most important functions of the language are the poetic and the emotive, because these two permit the author to show emotions when an aesthetic language is used. ◦ The poetic function is the ability to manipulate language in a creative way. The poet uses rhetorical figures (similarity, metaphor, etc.) and style. It’s subjective because represents the creative and aesthetic part of the poem. ◦ The emotive function is centered in the sender, which is the lyric subject or poetic voice, and manifests emotions, feelings, worries, etc. through the poem.
  5. 5. ◦ Every lyric text has an aesthetic value and a communicative value. ◦ The aesthetic value arises if it prevails the poetic function of the language. Grammar, expressions, prose, verse, literary resources, are combined to create an aesthetic message. ◦ The communicative value is understood as the potential of the lyric text, centered in its content and its expression, to transmit experiences or feelings to the reader.
  6. 6. ODE ◦ Usually a lyric poem of moderate length, with a serious subject, an elevated style, and a elaborate stanza pattern. ◦ The Ode often praises people, the arts of music and poetry, natural scenes, or abstract concepts. ◦ Ode is derived from a Greek word aeidein, which means to chant or sing. ◦ A prominent feature of ode is its uniform metrical feet, but poets generally do not strictly follow this rule though use highly elevated theme.
  7. 7. Thomas Campbell (July 27, 1777 - June 15, 1844) was a Scottish poet. Campbell was educated at the grammar school and university of his native town. He won prizes for classics and for verse-writing, and the vacations he spent as a tutor in the western Highlands. In 1799, six months after the publication of the Lyrical Ballads of Wordsworth and Coleridge, The Pleasures of Hope was published. He was elected Lord Rector of Glasgow. In 1834 he travelled to Paris and Algiers, where he wrote his Letters from the South. He died at Boulogne in 1844 and was buried in Westminster Abbey. Campbell's other works include a Life of Mrs Siddons (1842), and a narrative poem, The Pilgrim of Glencoe (1842). Ode… Ode to Winter by Thomas Campbell When first the fiery-mantled sun His heavenly race begun to run; Round the earth and ocean blue, His children four the Seasons flew. First, in green apparel dancing, The young Spring smiled with angel grace; Rosy summer next advancing, Rushed into her sire's embrace:- Her blue-haired sire, who bade her keep For ever nearest to his smile, On Calpe's olive-shaded steep, On India's citron-covered isles: More remote and buxom-brown, The Queen of vintage bowed before his throne, A rich pomegranate gemmed her gown, A ripe sheaf bound her zone.
  8. 8. BALLAD ◦ A relatively short narrative poem, written to be sung, with a simple and a dramatic action. ◦ The ballads tell of love, death, the supernatural, or a combination of these. ◦ Two characteristics of the ballad are: incremental repetition and the ballad stanza. ◦ Incremental repetition repeats one or more lines with a small but significant variations that advance the action. ◦ The ballad stanza is four lines; commonly, the first and third lines contain four feet or accents, the second and fourth lines contain three feet.
  9. 9. ballad… The Ballad of East and West by Rudyard Kipling “Oh, East is East, and West is West, and never the twain shall meet, Till Earth and Sky stand presently at God's great Judgment Seat; But there is neither East nor West, Border, nor Breed, nor Birth, When two strong men stand face to face, tho' they come from the ends of the earth! Kamal is out with twenty men to raise the Border-side, And he has lifted the Colonel's mare that is the Colonel's pride: He has lifted her out of the stable-door between the dawn and the day, And turned the calkins upon her feet, and ridden her far away. Then up and spoke the Colonel's son that led a troop of the Guides: "Is there never a man of all my men can say where Kamal hides?" Then up and spoke Mahommed Khan, the son of the Ressaldar: "If ye know the track of the morning-mist, ye know where his pickets are. At dusk he harries the Abazai -- at dawn he is into Bonair, But he must go by Fort Bukloh to his own place to fare, So if ye gallop to Fort Bukloh as fast as a bird can fly, By the favour of God ye may cut him off ere he win to the Tongue of Jagai But if he be past the Tongue of Jagai, right swiftly turn ye then, For the length and the breadth of that grisly plain is sown with Kamal's men.… Oh, East is East, and West is West, and never the twain shall meet, Till Earth and Sky stand presently at God's great Judgment Seat; But there is neither East nor West, Border, nor Breed, nor Birth, When two strong men stand face to face, tho' they come from the ends of the earth!” Rudyard Kipling was born in Mumbai, India on December 30, 1865. Kipling masterfully took his life experiences and wove it into exotic tales and thought-provoking poems. One of Kipling's most famous works is The Jungle Books, a collection of poems and stories which has been a beloved piece of literature since its first publication in 1894. Rudyard Kipling died on January 18, 1936 in London at the age of 70. Generations across the world continue to enjoy his poems and stories, ensuring that his legacy lives on.
  10. 10. SONNET ◦ From the Italian sonetto, which means “a little sound or song," the sonnet is a popular classical form that has compelled poets for centuries. ◦ Traditionally, the sonnet is a fourteen-line poem written in iambic pentameter, which employ one of several rhyme schemes and adhere to a tightly structured thematic organization. ◦ Two sonnet forms provide the models from which all other sonnets are formed: the Petrarchan and the Shakespearean. ◦ The Petrarchan sonnet consists of an octave (eight lines) and a sestet (six lines). ◦ The Shakespearean sonnet consists of three quatrains (four lines each) and a couplet (two lines). ◦ In Spanish, the sonnet consists in two quatrains and two tercets.
  11. 11. Sonnet… William Shakespeare was baptized on April 26, 1564, in Stratford-upon-Avon, England. From roughly 1594 onward he was an important member of the Lord Chamberlain’s Men company of theatrical players. Written records give little indication of the way in which Shakespeare’s professional life molded his artistry. All that can be deduced is that over the course of 20 years, Shakespeare wrote plays that capture the complete range of human emotion and conflict.
  12. 12. ELEGY ◦ Elegy is a form of literature which can be defined as a poem or song in the form of elegiac couplets, written in honor of someone deceased. It typically laments or mourns the death of the individual. ◦ Elegy is derived from the Greek work “elegus”, which means a song of bereavement sung along with a flute. The forms of elegies we see today were introduced in the 16th century. “Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard” by Thomas Gray and “When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom’d” by Walt Whitman are the two most popular examples of elegy.
  13. 13. Features of Elegy… ◦ Just like a classical epic, an elegy typically starts with the invocation of the muse and then proceeds by referencing to the traditional mythology. ◦ It often involves a poet who knows how to phrase the thoughts imaginatively in the first person. ◦ Questions are raised by the poet about destiny, justice and fate. ◦ The poet associates the events of the deceased with events in his own life by drawing a subtle comparison. ◦ This kind of digression gives the poet space to go beyond the main or crude subject to a deeper level where the connotations might be metaphorical. ◦ Towards the end the poet generally tries to provide comfort to ease the pain of the situation.
  14. 14. HAIKU ◦ Haiku poem has three lines. The pattern in Japanese genre is 5-7-5 moras. The mora is another name of a sound unit, which is like a syllable, but it is different from a syllable. As the moras cannot be translated into English, they are modified and syllables are used instead. The lines of such poems rarely rhyme with each other. ◦ Haiku became popular as tanka poems in Japan during the 9th and 12th centuries. Haiku poetry is also full of metaphors and personifications.
  15. 15. Features of Haiku… ◦ It contains three lines. ◦ It contains 17 syllables in total. ◦ A Haiku poem does not rhyme. ◦ Haiku poems frequently have a kigo or seasonal reference. ◦ Haiku poems are usually about nature or natural phenomenon. ◦ In English, this division between two parts can be shown by a dash.

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