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Numeracy & mathematical reasoning assessment photo album

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Numeracy & mathematical reasoning assessment photo album

  1. 1. Numeracy & Mathematical Reasoning Assessment Photo Album Faythe Allen Walden University Dr. Paul Trautman Assessment for Student Learning EDUC-6731B,C-3 October 12, 2014
  2. 2. WHAT WILL I LEARN? Common Core Standards ELA/Literacy ELA/Literacy W.7.1 W.7.1 Write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence. Write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence. Mathematics 7.NS.3 Mathematics 7.NS.3 Solve real-world and mathematical problems involving the four operations with rational numbers. Solve real-world and mathematical problems involving the four operations with rational numbers. Problem solvers know what has been done, know why the procedure was appropriate, and know how to justify it with reasons and evidence. Problem solvers know what has been done, know why the procedure was appropriate, and know how to justify it with reasons and evidence. Applying the properties and rules of integers aids in solving real world problems. Applying the properties and rules of integers aids in solving real world problems. UNDERSTANDINGS Writers use complete, logical sequence text with evidence and detail using language appropriate for the topic and audience. Writers use complete, logical sequence text with evidence and detail using language appropriate for the topic and audience. How are rational numbers used in everyday How are rational numbers used in everyday life? How are verbal ideas translated to the language of mathematics? Essential Questions How How do do I I know know which which mathematical mathematiclaifle ? operation operation to to use? use? How are verbal ideas translated to the language of mathematics?
  3. 3. WHAT WILL I BE ABLE TO DO? • Analyze situations in which positive and negative numbers are used • Evaluate fractions, decimals, and percent's in real world contexts. • Construct arguments to support mathematical reasoning that provides clear and relevant evidence
  4. 4. Rubrics Performance Task Diagnostic Parent Survey Formative Self Paper & Pencil
  5. 5. YOUR LEARNING WILL BE GUIDED THROUGH A SERIES OF ON-GOING ASSESSMENTS YOU WILL USE ASSESSMENTS TO IMPROVE YOUR UNDERSTANDING I WILL USE ASSESSMENTS TO ADJUST MY TEACHING TO BETTER HELP YOU
  6. 6. Pre-Assessments Let’s See What You Know…. Diagnostic Self Assessment http://www.thoughtfulclassroom.com/tools/PDFs/What_Comes_to_Mind.pdf
  7. 7. Let’s Talk to the Family………….. PARENT SURVEY Learn more about the facets of family/school relationships that drive student outcomes…………. The following best describes your attitude toward math as a child. ☐ Loved it!  Did what I had to do. ☐ Hated it! ☐ Can't remember http://surveymonkey.com/s/CJYQ57Y
  8. 8. FREQUENT CHECKS FOR UNDERSTANDING MULTIPLE OPPORTUNITIES TO PRACTICE WHAT YOU’RE LEARNING Extended Constructed Response Questions Self Assessing Task Cards & Rubrics Exit Tickets Activity Labs Quizzes Peer/Team Reviews Choice Boards Question & Answer Sessions Self Assessments Activity Labs Revisions & Improvements Web Quests Cyber Chases Do-Nows Journals Conferences
  9. 9. Distances Between Houses A Formative Assessment Represent the relative position of houses on a number line, with the school at zero, points to the west are represented by negative numbers, and points to the east are represented by positive numbers. Use http://www.createagraph.com to model the position of houses, stores, schools and businesses in your neighborhood. Construct viable arguments for your blueprint. (Oral Presentation) Evaluate your work using the rubric. Think, Pair, Share-How does my community use blueprints?
  10. 10. SUMMATIVE ASSESSMENTS DEMONSTRATING WHAT YOU’VE LEARNED -CHOICE OF PERFORMANCE TASK -PENCIL-AND-PAPER ASSESSMENTS
  11. 11. THE PERFORMANCE TASKS I The three seventh grade classes at Healy Middle School collected the most box tops for a school fundraiser, and won a $600 prize to share. Mr. Malcolm’s class collected 3,760 box tops, Ms. Wenger’s class collected 2,301, and Ms. Bishop’s class collected 1,855. How should they divide the money so that each class gets the same fraction of the prize money as the fraction of the box tops they collected? All explanations must include mathematical reasoning with clear relevant evidence. Select one of the following options: (a) Write a letter to the principal explaining how the the money should be divided between the three classes classes. • (b) (b) Create a power point presentation showing the principal principal the correct way to divide the money. • (c) Present an argument to the class justifying why they the principal should agree to the way you divided the money. the money.
  12. 12. or II At the beginning of the month, you had $154.56 in your school bookstore account. Your purchases include notebooks and pens that cost $36, an English book for $69.99, a thesaurus for $16.99, and a planner for $12.95. At the register, you decide to get a college hoodie that is $60 on sale for ½ off the original price. Calculate your new balance. Apply the properties of numbers to determine the ending balance in your bookstore account. One week later, you receive a letter from the school saying that you did not have sufficient funds in your account to cover the purchase. Do you agree with the bookstore? Select one of the following options: (a) Write a letter to the bookstore accountant to defend your position and provide mathematical evidence to support your claim. (b) Create a spreadsheet in Excel to justify the debits and credits to your account showing the account balance as a positive or negative balance. (c) Design an algorithm for finding the solution to the problem and present it to your classmates.
  13. 13. RUBRIC FOR PERFORMANCE TASKS Points 1 Poor 2 Average 3 Excellent Score (1-3): Understanding The solution is not complete indicating that parts of the problem are not understood. The solution shows that the student has a broad understanding of the problem and the major concepts necessary for its solution. The solution shows a deep understanding of the problem including the ability to identify the appropriate mathematical concepts and the information necessary for its solution. The solution addresses very few mathematical components presented in the task. The solution addresses some mathematical components presented in the task. The solution completely addresses most of the mathematical components presented in the task. Problem Solving A partially correct strategy is chosen, or a correct strategy for only solving part of the task is chosen. Uses correct strategies based on the mathematical situation in the task that leads to a correct solution. Uses a very efficient and sophisticated strategies leading directly to a correct solution. Steps and solution have many mathematical errors. Most of the steps and solution have no mathematical errors. Almost all of the steps and solution have no mathematical errors. Communication Very little awareness of audience or purpose is communicated Some awareness of audience and purpose is communicated, and may take place in the form of paraphrasing the task. A sense of audience and purpose is communicated. Everyday, familiar language is used to communicate ideas Formal math language is used throughout the solution to share and clarify ideas. Precise math language and symbolic notation are used to consolidate math thinking and to communicate ideas. Explanation is a little difficult to understand, and may lack and may lack some critical components Explanation is clear and correct but may lack few critical components. Explanation is detailed, clear, and correct and includes critical components. Neatness and Organization The work appears sloppy and unorganized. It is hard to know what information goes together The work is presented in a neat and organized fashion that is somewhat easy to read. The work is presented in a neat, clear, organized fashion that is easy to read. Writing Many grammar, usage, mechanics, and spelling errors. Some grammar, usage, mechanics, and spelling errors. Correct grammar, usage, mechanics, and spelling.
  14. 14. PAPER & PENCIL MULTIPLE CHOICE 24 ÷ = ⅓ (a) 8 (b) 48 (c) 64 (d) 72 TRUE/FALS E THE EXTENDED CONSRUCTED RESPONSE/ESSAY Create an algorithm for solving the problem: 24 pounds of four are divided into pound portions. How many pound portions can ⅓ ⅓ be made? Explain your process using mathematical reasoning and relevant evidence.
  15. 15. On the road to becoming Independent, Successful Learners

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