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Let’s talk about advertising
and creativity
Edward Boches, Professor of Advertising
House cleaning
Today:
Quick review: 10—15 min
Teams:
Lecture
Next:
Due: Good and bad ads
Read Felton: Ch. 1 - 3
#COMcreative
(when you find good stuff, post it)
Teams
Teams Sec A
Melanie
Caroline
Nicolas
Ann
Briana
Will
Maya
Karen
Michael
Vanessa
Ayusha
Jaime-Leigh
Rachel
Joseph
Brandon
K...
Teams Sec B
Gretchen
Daniel
Elias
Allie
Cody
Colleen
Edward
Michelle
Andrew
Zoe
Rhea
Petra
Alexa
Samantha
Sofia
John
Elaine...
Class 3: As a team: find a great creative ad and a lousy ad (creatively
speaking) large enough to hang on wall and discuss....
we begin with the most basic question
why do brands advertise?
there are a lot of reasons
generate awareness
generate awareness
generate awareness
increase consideration
build traffic
deliver an offer
drive sales
induce loyalty
generate buzz
influence behavior
engender good will
There are a lot of reasons that
brands advertise. It might be to
generate awareness. Increase
consideration. Build traffic....
or actually make a difference
patagonia
determining what, where, when and why
requires you to think about the brand
brand
brand
brand
brand
brand
brand
but perhaps more importantly, the consumer
customer journey
customer journey
customer journey
customer journey
customer journey
customer journey
If you think about how a customer
becomes customers, there’s a lot
to be done.
Look at the purchase process
from her persp...
Note you still haven’t secured
Emily as a customer since the
online or in-store shopping
experience can change her mind
or...
Advertising plays a role at every
point along the journey, which, by
the way, is not necessarily linear.
Emily might learn...
so, you have to engineer your presence
you have to be everywhere at the right time
with the right content for the right reason
look at IBM, for example
TV and video
print
outdoor
apps
experiential
branded entertainment
websites
social
Recap: So, brands advertise for
a lot of reasons, not just to get
you to buy now.
The advertising they create takes
on man...
And they have to be in the right
place at the right time for the
right reason with the right content,
utility, information...
In the days when most
advertising was paid media — TV,
print, outdoor — brands and their
agencies would come up with a
sin...
the emphasis was on consistency and
talking to a prospect or customer
today, it’s more about cohesiveness
Does the work reinforce the
brand? Is it the right content for
the medium, the technology
and the context? No need to
repe...
Dry Mesh
Voices NYC
Social Impressions
Lucky Counter
Example: The Guardian The Whole Picture
and more often than not it’s about doing,
not just talking
nike let users write encouraging messages to cancer victims at the tour
ford gave cars to millennials and let them generate content across social
equinox’s pursuit, connects spin cyclists to collective data and competition
dominos made it easier to order and track pizza
prudential built an interactive wall to demonstrate retirement
ikea created a social catalog
from messages, to utility, experiences, apps,
social experiments, and more
but somehow it has to be right for the brand;
it’s purpose, personality, voice, consumer
we’ll talk more about brand in upcoming
sessions
let’s talk about the role of creative
arguably the above ideas are creative
they capture your attention, avoid formulaic
approaches, involve the user, entertain,
deliver meaningful utility
why do we need ideas to be creative?
to get noticed, remembered and shared
and to overcome indifference and fatigue
Once you decide what you’re
trying to do you have another
challenge. Think it’s easy to get
Emily’s attention? Think again...
From an advertiser’s perspective,
it’s not such a good thing. Emily
has AdBlock plug in installed on
her Chrome browser. S...
Which is why all advertisers — 
despite the new tendency to
worship at the altar of data — 
need to embrace creativity as
...
You have to be like this guy.
You have get people to care, and
compel them to watch.
Interrupting, which worked for
years,...
My friend Tim Cawley, CCO and
founder at Sleek Machine and the
creator of many award winning
campaigns, including ideas th...
creativity comes into play across all media
TV
print
outdoor
radio
websites
online ads
apps
social media
ambient
experiential
mobile
stunts
creativity comes into play across all tactics
campaigns
one offs
platforms
content: stock
content: flow
big
small
expensive
cheap
new forms
do you call this creative?
simply letting a user confront your critics?
how about this?
or this?
there’s no shortage of ways to be creative
hi jack the moment
demonstrate a feature
crowdsource content in a novel way
seed a story with an idea that migrates across the web
offer useful content in snackable sizes
create advertising that is anti-advertising
the list could go on and on, but…..
these ideas are creative
they share certain characteristics
• They’re conceptual, not literal.
• They’re original/unexpected in that they don’t rely on the same tried
and true formul...
creativity can be in a message
creativity can in an experience
we will start with messages/ad concepts
why would we do that in digital age?
Because the ad-like object, which
could be print, poster, online ad,
landing page,social media post,
Instagram w Over, etc...
Conveys benefit
Celebrates user
Demo Announces
Makes a claim
Visual story
Image with words
Use of space Product
Headline/image
• They’re conceptual, not literal.
• They’re original/unexpected in that they don’t rely on the same tried
and true formul...
they are beautifully crafted and designed
they are simple
they have a hierarchy
First
Second
Third
they respect your intelligence
advertising can sell stuff, of course
but it doesn’t have to bang you over the head
advertising can make the world a better place
advertising can lighten your day
it can approach art
it can inform popular culture
but too much advertising sucks
it interrupts an interesting story with a less interesting story
start to think about what is great and why;
find great and not great, be prepared to talk about it
we have to be part of the solution, not part of the problem
Advertising and the role of creativity
Advertising and the role of creativity
Advertising and the role of creativity
Advertising and the role of creativity
Advertising and the role of creativity
Advertising and the role of creativity
Advertising and the role of creativity
Advertising and the role of creativity
Advertising and the role of creativity
Advertising and the role of creativity
Advertising and the role of creativity
Advertising and the role of creativity
Advertising and the role of creativity
Advertising and the role of creativity
Advertising and the role of creativity
Advertising and the role of creativity
Advertising and the role of creativity
Advertising and the role of creativity
Advertising and the role of creativity
Advertising and the role of creativity
Advertising and the role of creativity
Advertising and the role of creativity
Advertising and the role of creativity
Advertising and the role of creativity
Advertising and the role of creativity
Advertising and the role of creativity
Advertising and the role of creativity
Advertising and the role of creativity
Advertising and the role of creativity
Advertising and the role of creativity
Advertising and the role of creativity
Advertising and the role of creativity
Advertising and the role of creativity
Advertising and the role of creativity
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Advertising and the role of creativity

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Lecture for CM 417, BU, College of Communication: Why we advertise and the role of creativity

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Advertising and the role of creativity

  1. Let’s talk about advertising and creativity Edward Boches, Professor of Advertising
  2. House cleaning Today: Quick review: 10—15 min Teams: Lecture Next: Due: Good and bad ads Read Felton: Ch. 1 - 3
  3. #COMcreative (when you find good stuff, post it)
  4. Teams
  5. Teams Sec A Melanie Caroline Nicolas Ann Briana Will Maya Karen Michael Vanessa Ayusha Jaime-Leigh Rachel Joseph Brandon Kathryn Seo Yoon Oliver
  6. Teams Sec B Gretchen Daniel Elias Allie Cody Colleen Edward Michelle Andrew Zoe Rhea Petra Alexa Samantha Sofia John Elaine Monique
  7. Class 3: As a team: find a great creative ad and a lousy ad (creatively speaking) large enough to hang on wall and discuss. Prepare to support your opinion. NO TV or VIDEO — has to be telegraphic. Read Felton Chapter 1–3. Always be looking for, looking at, and collecting great work. Develop your frame of reference, taste and judgment.
  8. we begin with the most basic question
  9. why do brands advertise?
  10. there are a lot of reasons
  11. generate awareness
  12. generate awareness
  13. generate awareness
  14. increase consideration
  15. build traffic
  16. deliver an offer
  17. drive sales
  18. induce loyalty
  19. generate buzz
  20. influence behavior
  21. engender good will
  22. There are a lot of reasons that brands advertise. It might be to generate awareness. Increase consideration. Build traffic. Deliver an offer. Drive sales. Induce loyalty. Inspire sharing. Get liked. Start a conversation. Put simply, advertisers advertise to call people to action. Maybe it’s to get a consumer to buy something right now. Every brand wants that. But long-term thinking also demands that sometimes our only purpose is to get people to like us. Or talk about us. Or see us in a positive light.
  23. or actually make a difference
  24. patagonia
  25. determining what, where, when and why requires you to think about the brand
  26. brand
  27. brand
  28. brand
  29. brand
  30. brand
  31. brand
  32. but perhaps more importantly, the consumer
  33. customer journey
  34. customer journey
  35. customer journey
  36. customer journey
  37. customer journey
  38. customer journey
  39. If you think about how a customer becomes customers, there’s a lot to be done. Look at the purchase process from her perspective. A prospect customer, let’s call her Emily, first has to become aware of your brand and feel good about it. Or at least be interested. If Emily is at all diligent, she’ll do some basic exploration, go online, visit a website and check in with friends. If Emily needs your product or service right away, she’ll start the consideration process. If not, you’ll at least want her to file you away in her memory (actual or digital) under “want it some day.”
  40. Note you still haven’t secured Emily as a customer since the online or in-store shopping experience can change her mind or present her with an even better option. A friend’s opinion might raise questions. Emily’s newfound interest in the category could open her eyes to someone else’s advertising. And on an on it goes. You’ll want to be there every step of the way. Even if things work out and Emily becomes a customer, you’re still not done. You’ll want her to return, become loyal and finally recommend you to her friends.
  41. Advertising plays a role at every point along the journey, which, by the way, is not necessarily linear. Emily might learn about you from a TV commercial, from a friend on Facebook or even from the sales clerk who converts her from the brand she thought she preferred until she got to the store and was presented an alternative right at the moment of truth. Content, events, social media and experiential all come into play.
  42. so, you have to engineer your presence
  43. you have to be everywhere at the right time with the right content for the right reason
  44. look at IBM, for example
  45. TV and video
  46. print
  47. outdoor
  48. apps
  49. experiential
  50. branded entertainment
  51. websites
  52. social
  53. Recap: So, brands advertise for a lot of reasons, not just to get you to buy now. The advertising they create takes on many forms and runs in all kinds of different media. Some of that media is paid media (TV, print, outdoor.) Some is owned (websites). Some is earned (press and blog coverage and/or online buzz.)
  54. And they have to be in the right place at the right time for the right reason with the right content, utility, information. Depending on what they are trying to accomplish.
  55. In the days when most advertising was paid media — TV, print, outdoor — brands and their agencies would come up with a single, focused brand campaign and deliver very consistent work — ads and messages — across all the media. There was a desire to leverage that consistency to achieve awareness, brand name recognition and make sure that a viewer knew what brand she was looking at.
  56. the emphasis was on consistency and talking to a prospect or customer
  57. today, it’s more about cohesiveness
  58. Does the work reinforce the brand? Is it the right content for the medium, the technology and the context? No need to repeat yourself over and over again in an age when people can so easily tune you out. You have to stay fresh, new, interesting all the time.
  59. Dry Mesh
  60. Voices NYC
  61. Social Impressions
  62. Lucky Counter
  63. Example: The Guardian The Whole Picture
  64. and more often than not it’s about doing, not just talking
  65. nike let users write encouraging messages to cancer victims at the tour
  66. ford gave cars to millennials and let them generate content across social
  67. equinox’s pursuit, connects spin cyclists to collective data and competition
  68. dominos made it easier to order and track pizza
  69. prudential built an interactive wall to demonstrate retirement
  70. ikea created a social catalog
  71. from messages, to utility, experiences, apps, social experiments, and more
  72. but somehow it has to be right for the brand; it’s purpose, personality, voice, consumer
  73. we’ll talk more about brand in upcoming sessions
  74. let’s talk about the role of creative
  75. arguably the above ideas are creative
  76. they capture your attention, avoid formulaic approaches, involve the user, entertain, deliver meaningful utility
  77. why do we need ideas to be creative?
  78. to get noticed, remembered and shared
  79. and to overcome indifference and fatigue
  80. Once you decide what you’re trying to do you have another challenge. Think it’s easy to get Emily’s attention? Think again. We live in an age of information and content overload. (There are 9,854 tweets, 2,504 Instagrams, and 106,021 YouTube videos posted every second.) From Emily’s perspective that’s a good thing. She can access and filter content by email, Twitter, Snapchat, iMessage, Facebook, Netflix, Instagram, Periscope and maybe even linear television. She can find what she wants when she wants. And she can rely on friends and trusted contacts for recommendations.
  81. From an advertiser’s perspective, it’s not such a good thing. Emily has AdBlock plug in installed on her Chrome browser. She scrolls past paid posts in her Facebook stream. Skips pre-rolls the moment the skip button appears. And even pays for a Spotify subscription to assure there are no ads. Most of the advertising that does worm its way into her media arrives uninvited. At best it’s intrusive; at worst it’s downright annoying.
  82. Which is why all advertisers —  despite the new tendency to worship at the altar of data —  need to embrace creativity as the solution. A great creative idea — be it an ad, an app, an experience, a digital platform, or a social initiative — has the power to be noticed, watched, remembered, used and shared, leaving a positive impression and overcoming the single greatest obstacle confronting all advertisers today — indifference.
  83. You have to be like this guy. You have get people to care, and compel them to watch. Interrupting, which worked for years, is dead in an age when everyone can mute, skip, DVR or otherwise avoid advertising. That’s the role of creativity.
  84. My friend Tim Cawley, CCO and founder at Sleek Machine and the creator of many award winning campaigns, including ideas that earned attention and inspired sharing, says this is the only filter that matters. “Would you watch it in your feed and would you pass it on to a friend.” Tim did this for Century 21
  85. creativity comes into play across all media
  86. TV print outdoor radio websites online ads apps social media ambient experiential mobile stunts
  87. creativity comes into play across all tactics
  88. campaigns one offs platforms content: stock content: flow big small expensive cheap new forms
  89. do you call this creative?
  90. simply letting a user confront your critics?
  91. how about this?
  92. or this?
  93. there’s no shortage of ways to be creative
  94. hi jack the moment
  95. demonstrate a feature
  96. crowdsource content in a novel way
  97. seed a story with an idea that migrates across the web
  98. offer useful content in snackable sizes
  99. create advertising that is anti-advertising
  100. the list could go on and on, but…..
  101. these ideas are creative
  102. they share certain characteristics
  103. • They’re conceptual, not literal. • They’re original/unexpected in that they don’t rely on the same tried and true formulas. • They invite you into the experience. • They entertain first, sell second. • They’re visually arresting. • They allow you to participate. • They’re either fun, useful, beautiful or a combination of the three.
  104. creativity can be in a message
  105. creativity can in an experience
  106. we will start with messages/ad concepts
  107. why would we do that in digital age?
  108. Because the ad-like object, which could be print, poster, online ad, landing page,social media post, Instagram w Over, etc.remains the fastest, simplest way to show that you can think creatively and reduce a message to a single, concise, clever concept.
  109. Conveys benefit Celebrates user Demo Announces Makes a claim
  110. Visual story Image with words Use of space Product Headline/image
  111. • They’re conceptual, not literal. • They’re original/unexpected in that they don’t rely on the same tried and true formulas. • They invite you into the experience. • They entertain first, sell second. • They’re visually arresting. • They allow you to participate. • They’re either fun, useful, beautiful or a combination of the three.
  112. they are beautifully crafted and designed
  113. they are simple
  114. they have a hierarchy
  115. First Second Third
  116. they respect your intelligence
  117. advertising can sell stuff, of course
  118. but it doesn’t have to bang you over the head
  119. advertising can make the world a better place
  120. advertising can lighten your day
  121. it can approach art
  122. it can inform popular culture
  123. but too much advertising sucks
  124. it interrupts an interesting story with a less interesting story
  125. start to think about what is great and why; find great and not great, be prepared to talk about it
  126. we have to be part of the solution, not part of the problem

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