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What it means to be educated in 2050

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What it means to be educated in 2050

  1. 1. What will it mean to be educated in 2050? derek.wenmoth@core-ed.org @dwenmoth #corebreakfast
  2. 2. Much has been wri.en and a lot spoken about learning for the 21st Century, much of which is defined by references to the changes in technology, learning spaces and society – but what, in the end, will differen@ate an educated person in 2050 from an educated person in 1950? What has changed and is likely to change? How should this affect our view of schools and schooling, and of learning, and of our educa@on system as a whole? What are the drivers of this change? What are the ‘trends’ we currently see in educa@on and are these the things that are actually required to contribute to developing the educated ci@zen of 2050?
  3. 3. NZ in the 1950s •  Baby boom –  Popula@on reached 2 million (Sept, 1952) –  More than 125,000 immigrants se.led here –  Many new schools built •  Britain’s farmyard –  90% export earnings from farming –  Sheep numbers rose 40% in the 1950s •  By 1959… –  54% dwellings had refrigerator –  57% had a washing machine –  14% dwellings s@ll had no piped water –  19% dwellings s@ll without flush toilet •  Communica@ons –  ‘snail mail’ – 200 million le.ers per year –  24.5 air mails –  8 million telegrams –  1440 Post Offices na@onally –  One landline per five people – many party lines
  4. 4. The curriculum - 1955? •  Reading, wri@ng and arithme@c •  Military drill (secondary) •  Phys Ed •  Civics, ci@zenship and moral training •  Woodwork (boys), Homecraa (girls)
  5. 5. What will life be like in 2050? •  9 billion people on the planet •  What will ci@es be like? •  What will we eat? •  What forms of transporta@on will we use? •  Will global warming trigger catastrophic changes? •  Will robots have taken over the workforce? •  What advances in health will there be?
  6. 6. Future of communica@ons?
  7. 7. Future health? h.p://bit.ly/21wroT9
  8. 8. Ar@ficial intelligence? h.p://www.theverge.com/2016/3/9/11184362/google-alphago-go- deepmind-result
  9. 9. Future Ci@es? h.p://bit.ly/1UhTp1u
  10. 10. Flying cars? h.p://bit.ly/22odzZl
  11. 11. Robot teachers The kind of things that are easy to teach are now easy to automate, digi@ze or outsource h.p://bit.ly/1LscdZB
  12. 12. Changes in the demand for skills Trends in different tasks in occupa7ons (United States) 35 40 45 50 55 60 65 70 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2006 2009 Routine manual Nonroutine manual Routine cognitive Nonroutine analytic Nonroutine interpersonal Mean task input in percentiles of 1960 task distribution Source: Autor, David H. and Brendan M. Price. 2013. "The Changing Task Composition of the US Labor Market: An Update of Autor, Levy, and Murnane (2003)." MIT Mimeograph, June.
  13. 13. 14 companies – 25 billionaires h.p://onforb.es/1U6FRGT Taxi service Smartphone maker Room rental Data mining Drones Scrapbooking Online commerce Taxi service Online bookseller Employment Blood tes@ng Messaging Threat detec@on File sharing
  14. 14. What’s so interes@ng? •  1,810 billionaires worldwide (Forbes, March, 2016) •  18/25 are under 30 •  Their business model is completely different •  Crowd sourced ideas •  Widespread growth through social media •  How many of these ‘industries’ existed ten years ago? Or even five?
  15. 15. The Future… •  Food supply •  Water •  Cryogenics •  Nano-technology •  Cultural assimila@on •  Human rights •  Poverty •  Religious intolerance
  16. 16. New skillsets required New skillsets for the knowledge economy… •  Complex problem solving •  Innova@on and crea@vity •  Communica@on and collabora@on •  Designers and creators – not passive consumers
  17. 17. The 10 skills most valued by employers •  communica@on skills •  customer service skills – in person, on the phone, and online •  ability to work well in a team •  literacy and numeracy skills •  confidence learning about and using computers and technology •  planning and organisa@onal skills •  ini@a@ve and a can-do antude •  problem-solving skills •  good work habits and independence •  health and safety skills. According to Business New Zealand, the top 10 skills employers look for are: h.p://bit.ly/1pvGZHc
  18. 18. Purposes of Educa@on 1.  To develop the intellect, presumably including linguis@c, mathema@cal and analy@c capabili@es. 2.  To produce competent, caring, loving, and lovable people. 3.  To create and sustain a democra@c society 4.  To invest in producing future workers for the workforce and, ul@mately, corporate profits. Rather than a.emp@ng to define what it means to be well- educated, should we instead be asking about the purposes of educa,on? Alfie Kohn - h.p://www.alfiekohn.org/
  19. 19. Student expecta@ons Washor, E and Mohkowski, C (2013) Leaving to learn Do my teachers really know about me and my interests and talents? Do I find what the school is teaching relevant to my interests? Do I have opportuni@es to apply what I am learning in real world senngs and contexts? Do I feel appropriately challenged in my learning? Can I pursue my learning out of the standard sequence? Do I have sufficient @me to learn at my own pace? Do I have real choice about what, where and how I learn? Do I have opportuni@es to explore and make mistakes? Do I have opportuni@es to engage deeply in my learning and to prac@ce the skills I need to lean?
  20. 20. Educa@on’s two faces “Hard Skills” •  Academic success •  Achievement focus •  ‘Subjects’ “Soa Skills” •  Competencies •  Disposi@ons •  Values
  21. 21. Global network NPDL Clusters located in seven countries around the world working together to design deep learning, develop new pedagogies that enable deep learning, and improve learning conditions that expand deep learning. Uruguay Canada USA Finland Australia New Zealand Netherlands New Pedagogies for Deep Learning
  22. 22. Deep Learning Competencies – 6 C’s CHARACTER Learning to deep learn, armed with the essential character traits of grit, tenacity, perseverance, and resilience; and the ability to make learning an integral part of living. CREATIVITY Having an ‘entrepreneurial eye’ for economic and social opportunities, asking the right inquiry questions to generate novel ideas, and leadership to pursue those ideas and turn them into action. COMMUNICATION Communicating effectively with a variety of styles, modes, and tools (including digital tools), tailored for a range of audiences. CITIZENSHIP Thinking like global citizens, considering global issues based on a deep understanding of diverse values and worldviews, and with a genuine interest and ability to solve ambiguous and complex real-world problems that impact human and environmental sustainability. COLLABORATION Work interdependently and synergistically in teams with strong interpersonal and team-related skills including effective management of team dynamics and challenges, making substantive decisions together, and learning from and contributing to the learning of others. CRITICAL THINKING Critically evaluating information and arguments, seeing patterns and connections, constructing meaningful knowledge, and applying it in the real world.
  23. 23. New Measures? •  Knowledge Crea@on •  Working with abstrac@ons •  Systems thinking •  Cogni@ve persistence •  Collec@ve cogni@ve responsibility
  24. 24. Knowledge Crea@on •  Knowledge is not an object, but a series of flows; it is a process, not a product •  It is produced not in the minds of people but in the interac@ons between people •  The idea of acquiring knowledge, as a series of truths, is obsolete
  25. 25. Working with abstrac@ons •  Conver@ng the abstract to the concrete remains an honoured part of teaching •  Applying disciplinary knowledge to real life has always involved abstrac@on
  26. 26. Systems thinking •  Problems becoming more complex – many more variables •  Solu@ons require intui@on, dealing with hunches
  27. 27. Cogni@ve persistence •  Sustained study and pursuit of understanding •  Comprehending long texts •  Following extended lines of thought •  Sustained crea@ve effort
  28. 28. Collec@ve cogni@ve responsibility •  Moving beyond ‘collabora@on’ •  Already essen@al for design teams, research teams, planning teams •  Involves turning cogni@ve responsibility over to students
  29. 29. Urgency How are these things catered for in your school? How do you know?
  30. 30. Our legacy…? “Children are the living message we sent to a time we will not see” Neil Postman
  31. 31. derek.wenmoth@core-ed.org @dwenmoth #corebreakfast

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