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Workshop: Lesson plan through a critical thinking perspective

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Workshop: Lesson plan through a critical thinking perspective

  1. 1. Welcom e
  2. 2. ELABORATION OF A LESSON PLAN Daniel Sineus Presentation Date: June 19 and 20, 2013 WORKSHOP
  3. 3. Objectives Getting to know the components of a lesson plan and be able to write one Redesigning instructions through the lesson plan Reasoning teaching and assessment methods
  4. 4. Overview Lesson Plan A. Elements of Thoughts B. Outline of a lesson plan C. Teaching approaches from CT perspective D. Bloom’s Taxonomy E. Assessments
  5. 5. Critical Thinking: a key to restructure our teaching method
  6. 6. Critical Thinking Critical Thinking is that mode of thinking — about any subject, content, or problem — in which the thinker improves the quality of his or her thinking by skillfully analyzing, assessing, and reconstructing it. Critical thinking is self-directed, self-disciplined, self-monitored, and self-corrective thinking. It presupposes assent to rigorous standards of excellence and mindful command of their use. It entails effective communication and problem-solving abilities, as well as a commitment to overcome our native egocentrism and sociocentrism.
  7. 7. Elements of a lesson plan
  8. 8. Elements of Lesson Plan
  9. 9. Delimitation of the Topic Lesson plan from a procedural teaching perspective ELEMENTS to focus on  OBJECTIVES  CONCEPTS  TEACHING ACTIVITIES/STRATE GIES  STUDENT ASSESSMENTS Lesson plan from a CT perspective ELEMENTS to focus on OBJECTIVES TEACHING ACTIVITIES STUDENTS ASSESSMENT STUDENT-TEACHER RELATIONSHIP
  10. 10. The ABCD Model for writing objectives • Describes the intended learner of the instruction • Often the audience is identified only in the 1st level of objective because of redundancy AUDIENCE • Describes learner capability • Demonstration of knowledge or skills in any of the domains of learning: cognitive, psychomotor or affective. BEHAVIOR • Equipments or tools that may (or may not) be utilized in completion of the behavior • Environmental conditions may also be included CONDITION Degree: Describe the minimum criteria for acceptable student performance.
  11. 11. Phrases/words of ABCD Model of Writing Objectives A: The Students/participants/C olleagues/teaching Staff B: Should/will be able to C: given some handouts about/ a set of vocabulary/ given access to the internet, D: Without error/ 9 times out of 10 times, within 60 seconds ABCD OBJECTIVES
  12. 12. Let’s try this activity together Identify the different parts of an ABCD Objective Given a standard sentence, the E010 students should be able to identify the noun and verb without error. The EMT-B participant in this pediatric workshop should be able to identify at least 4 warning signs of possible child abuse from a family member’s interview that contains 5 warning signs.
  13. 13. DIMENSIONS OF CRITICAL THOUGHT 1 • Affective strategies • Cognitive Strategies- Micro Abilities 2 • Cognitive Strategies- Macro Abilities 3
  14. 14. Teaching Strategies Active Learning Inclusive Learning Case Based-Teaching Discussion-Based Teaching Group Work or Team Work Mediative Teaching Collaborative Teaching Scaffolding
  15. 15. Teaching Strategies
  16. 16. Revised Bloom’s Taxonomy
  17. 17. Three Types of Learning/Domains of learning or activites Cognitive: Mental Skills (Knowledge). The cognitive domain involves knowledge and the development of intellectual skills (Bloom, 1956). Affective: growth in feelings or emotional areas (Attitude or self). The affective domain (Krathwohl, Bloom, Masia, 1973) includes the manner in which we deal with things emotionally, such as feelings, values, appreciation, enthusiasm, motivation, and attitudes. Psychomotor: The psychomotor domain (Simpson, 1972) includes physical movement, coordination, and use of the motor-skill areas. Development of these skills requires practice and is measured in terms of speed, precision, distance, procedures, or techniques in execution.
  18. 18. Classification of Bloom’s Taxonomy
  19. 19. Key words for Psychomotor and Affective Domains Psychomotor Perception/Awareness: chooses, describes, detects, differentiates, distinguishes, identifies, isolates, relates, selects. Set, readiness for acting: begins, displays, explains, moves, proceeds, reacts, shows, states, volunteers. Adaptation: adapts, alters, changes, rearranges, reorganizes, revises, varies. Guided Response: copies, traces, follows, react, reproduce, responds Affective • Receiving Phenomena: Awareness, willingness to hear, selected attention: asks, chooses, describes, follows, gives, holds, identifies, locates, names, points to, selects, sits, erects, replies, uses. • Responding to Phenomena: Active participation on the part of the learners: answers, assists, aids, complies, conforms, discusses, greets, helps, labels, performs, practices, presents, reads, recites, reports, selects, tells, writes. • Valuing: The worth or value a person attaches to a particular object: completes, demonstrates, differentiates, explains, follows, forms, initiates, invites, joins, justifies, proposes, reads, reports, selects,
  20. 20. How to evaluate your Students Student Assessments Diagnostic Assessment Summative Assessment
  21. 21. Assessing Students Traditional & Alternative Methods
  22. 22. What do you understand about this picture?
  23. 23. Traditional Methods Tests/exams (usually done at the end of a unit of study or at the completion of a semester or academic year) Quizzes (usually weekly or even daily) Pop-quizzes (given without warning) Term papers/Reports/Research projects (usually assigned only in “higher ability” classes; student researches a topic or person)
  24. 24. Pros and Cons Advantages (+) More questions can be asked in little time Scoring is easier, more accurate Greater content sampling (multiple-choice tests) Can measure higher mental processes Some (for example, essays) can measure writing ability Disadvantages (-) Higher mental processes are more difficult to measure in certain kinds Encourages rote memorization Encourages guessing Can neglect writing ability If essay, poor content sampling, unreliable scoring, encourages bluffing
  25. 25. Discuss this cartoon with a Colleague. How do students understand Assessment?
  26. 26. Alternative Methods
  27. 27. Product-Based Assessment  Assessment that requires a concrete end result  Some examples:  Posters  Art  Exhibit  Music  Poetry  Role-playing  Video
  28. 28. Authentic Assessment Methods of assessing student achievement or performance that are as close to real-life situations as possible. Students are asked to apply knowledge and/or skills. Usually have a higher rate of completion and student involvement. The incidence of cheating is also greatly reduced.
  29. 29. 3…2…1… What are 3 things you learned today? What are 2 things you would like to know more about? 1 thing you plan to change in your teaching or evaluation of students?
  30. 30. QUESTIONS?
  31. 31. THANK YOU

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