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ANTIPARKINSONIANANTIPARKINSONIAN
DRUGSDRUGS
DR. NUTANBALA GOSWAMI,
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR,
PHARMACOLOGY DEPARTMENT,
GOVT. MED...
PARKINSONISM
• A degenerative and progressive disorder
• Associated with neurological consequences of
decreased dopamine l...
PARKINSONISM - RIGIDITY
 Increased resistance to passive motion when
limbs are moved through their range of motion –
norm...
PARKINSONISM – CONTD.
• Tremor
– First sign
– Affects handwriting – trailing off at ends of words
– More prominent at rest...
PD – IMPAIRMENT OF POSTURAL
BALANCE
Prone
to
falling
PARKINSONISM (PD) - SIGNS
PARKINSONISM - HISTORY
• Parkinson's disease was first formally described
in "An Essay on the Shaking Palsy," published in...
PARKINSON`S DISEASE -
PATHOPHYSIOLOGY
 The Basal Ganglia Consists of Five Large
Subcortical Nuclei that Participate in Co...
PD, PATHOPHYSIOLOGY – CONTD.
 Degeneration of
neurones in the
substantia nigra pars
compacta
 Degeneration of
nigrostria...
PD, PATHOPHYSIOLOGY – CONTD.
 Disruption of balance between Acetylcholine and
Dopamine:
Striatum
Substancia
Nigra
DA fibr...
PD, PATHOPHYSIOLOGY – CONTD.
 Imbalance primarily between the
excitatory neurotransmitter
Acetylcholine and inhibitory
ne...
PARKINSONISM - ETIOLOGY
 Genetic:
 Environmental triggers:
 Infectious agents – Encephalitis lethargica (epidemic)
 En...
PARKINSONISM - ETIOLOGY
TREATMENT OF PD
CLASSIFICATION OF
ANTIPARKINSONIAN DRUGS
1. Drugs acting on dopaminergic system:
a) Dopamine precursors – Levodopa (l-dopa...
CNS
ANTIPARKINSONIAN DRUGS
ANTIPARKINSONIAN DRUGS
CNS
ANTIPARKINSONIAN DRUGS
QUESTION ?
• Dopamine and Tyrosine Are Not Used for
Parkinson Disease Therapy, Why?
– Dopamine Doesn't Cross the Blood Bra...
LEVODOPA
• Single most effective agent in PD
• Inactive by itself but immediate precursor of
Dopamine
• Peripherally - 95%...
ACTIONS OF LEVODOPA – CNS
• Effective in Eliminating Most of the Symptoms of
Parkinson Disease (initially motor)
– Bradyki...
ACTIONS OF LEVODOPA – CONTD.
• CVS:
– Cardiac Stimulation Due to Beta adrenergic effect on
Heart
– Though stimulates perip...
LEVODOPA - PHARMACOKINETICS
• Absorbed rapidly from small intestine – aromatic
amino acid transport system
• High First Pa...
LEVODOPA - PHARMACOKINETICS
3 – OMD
COMT
Levodopa
DDC
Dopamine
Any drug which can reduce DDC peripherally (called peripher...
LEVODOPA - ADRS
• Initial Therapy:
 Nausea and vomiting - 80% of patients
 Postural hypotension , but asymptomatic : 30 ...
LEVODOPA (ADVERSE EFFECTS) -
PROLONGED THERAPY
1. Abnormal movements: Facial tics, grimacing,
tongue thrusting, choreoathe...
LEVODOPA (ADVERSE EFFECTS) -
PROLONGED THERAPY – CONTD.
 Fluctuation in Motor Performance:
 Initial therapy – each dose ...
LEVODOPA (ADVERSE EFFECTS) -
PROLONGED THERAPY – CONTD.
 Denervation Supersensitivity:
In Basal Ganglia – destruction of...
LEVODOPA – DRUG INTERACTIONS
 Pyridoxine – abolishes therapeutic effect of levodopa
 Antipsychotic Drugs – Phenothiazine...
LEVODOPA VS PERIPHERAL
DECARBOXYLASE INHIBITORS
 Carbidopa and Benserazide:
In practice, almost always administered
Do ...
LEVODOPA VS PERIPHERAL
DECARBOXYLASE INHIBITORS –
CONTD.
 Benefits:
Plasma t1/2 – prolonged
Dose of levodopa – 30% redu...
LEVODOPA – CARBIDOPA (MORE
LEVODOPA AVAILABILITY IN CNS )
CNS
ANTIPARKINSONIAN DRUGS
CNS -- ANTIPARKINSONIAN DRUGS
PATIENT EDUCATION
 “Wearing off” phenomenon – gradual worsening of
symptoms as medication b...
CNS -- ANTIPARKINSONIAN DRUGS
NURSING PROCESS
 Nursing Actions
 Exact timing of medication – cannot be administered
late...
• Five Stages
– Flexion of affected arm - tremor / leaning toward
unaffected side
– Slow shuffling gate
– Increased diffic...
THANK YOU
Antiparkinsonian drugs ppts 1
Antiparkinsonian drugs ppts 1
Antiparkinsonian drugs ppts 1
Antiparkinsonian drugs ppts 1
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Antiparkinsonian drugs ppts 1

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Veröffentlicht am

Dr. Nutanbala Goswami,
Associate Professer,
Pharmacology Department,
Govt. Medical College, Bhavnagar.

Veröffentlicht in: Gesundheit & Medizin
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Antiparkinsonian drugs ppts 1

  1. 1. ANTIPARKINSONIANANTIPARKINSONIAN DRUGSDRUGS DR. NUTANBALA GOSWAMI, ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR, PHARMACOLOGY DEPARTMENT, GOVT. MEDICAL COLLEGE, BHAVNAGAR.
  2. 2. PARKINSONISM • A degenerative and progressive disorder • Associated with neurological consequences of decreased dopamine levels produced by the basal ganglia (substantia nigra) • Extrapyramidal motor function disorder symptoms characterized by 1. Rigidity 2. Tremor 3. Hypokinesia/Bradykinesia 4. Impairment of postural balance - falling
  3. 3. PARKINSONISM - RIGIDITY  Increased resistance to passive motion when limbs are moved through their range of motion – normal motions  “Cogwheel rigidity” – Jerky quality – intermittent catches of movement  Caused by sustained involuntary contraction of one or more muscles  Muscle soreness; feeling tired & achy  Slowness of movement due to inhibition of alternating muscle group contraction & relaxation in opposing muscle groups
  4. 4. PARKINSONISM – CONTD. • Tremor – First sign – Affects handwriting – trailing off at ends of words – More prominent at rest – Aggravated by emotional stress or increased concentration – “Pill rolling” – rotary motion of thumb and forefinger – NOT essential tremor – intentional • Bradykinesia: Loss of automatic movements: – Blinking of eyes, swinging of arms while walking, swallowing of saliva, self-expression with facial and hand movements, lack of spontaneous activity, lack of postural adjustment – Results in: stooped posture, masked face, drooling of saliva, shuffling gait (festination); difficulty initiating movement
  5. 5. PD – IMPAIRMENT OF POSTURAL BALANCE Prone to falling
  6. 6. PARKINSONISM (PD) - SIGNS
  7. 7. PARKINSONISM - HISTORY • Parkinson's disease was first formally described in "An Essay on the Shaking Palsy," published in 1817 by a London physician named James Parkinson, but it has probably existed for many thousands of years. Its symptoms and potential therapies were mentioned in the Ayurveda, the system of medicine practiced in India as early as 5000 BC, and in the first Chinese medical text, Nei Jing, which appeared 2500 years ago • Majority of causes are Idiopathic
  8. 8. PARKINSON`S DISEASE - PATHOPHYSIOLOGY  The Basal Ganglia Consists of Five Large Subcortical Nuclei that Participate in Control of Movement:  Caudate Nucleus  Putamen  Globus Pallidus  Subthalamic Nucleus  Substantia Nigra  Striatum – Caudate Nucleus and Putamen  Substancia nigra pars compacta provide DA innervation to striatum
  9. 9. PD, PATHOPHYSIOLOGY – CONTD.  Degeneration of neurones in the substantia nigra pars compacta  Degeneration of nigrostriatal (dopaminergic) tract  Results in deficiency of Dopamine in Striatum - >80%
  10. 10. PD, PATHOPHYSIOLOGY – CONTD.  Disruption of balance between Acetylcholine and Dopamine: Striatum Substancia Nigra DA fibres (Nigrostrital pathway) GABAergic fibres Cholinergic
  11. 11. PD, PATHOPHYSIOLOGY – CONTD.  Imbalance primarily between the excitatory neurotransmitter Acetylcholine and inhibitory neurotransmitter Dopamine in the Basal Ganglia ACh DA
  12. 12. PARKINSONISM - ETIOLOGY  Genetic:  Environmental triggers:  Infectious agents – Encephalitis lethargica (epidemic)  Environmental toxins - MPTP (1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6- tetrahydropyridine)  Acquired Brain Injury  Excitotoxicity  Glutamate, the normal excitatory transmitter in neurones in excess  Mediated by activated NMDA receptor  Ca++ overload – destructive processes  Energy metabolism and aging:  Reduction in function of complex 1 of mitochondrial-electron transport chain  Oxidative stress: Free radicals (`OH) – hydrogen peroxide and oxyradicals : damage to lipid membranes and DNA
  13. 13. PARKINSONISM - ETIOLOGY
  14. 14. TREATMENT OF PD
  15. 15. CLASSIFICATION OF ANTIPARKINSONIAN DRUGS 1. Drugs acting on dopaminergic system: a) Dopamine precursors – Levodopa (l-dopa) b) Peripheral decarboxylase inhibitors – carbidopa and benserazide c) Dopaminergic agonists: Bromocriptyne, Ropinirole and Pramipexole d) MAO-B inhibitors – Selegiline, Rasagiline e) COMT inhibitors – Entacapone, Tolcapone f) Dopamine facilitator - Amantadine 2. Drugs acting on cholinergic system a) Central anticholinergics – Teihexyphenidyl (Benzhexol), Procyclidine, Biperiden b) Antihistaminics – Orphenadrine, Promethazine
  16. 16. CNS ANTIPARKINSONIAN DRUGS
  17. 17. ANTIPARKINSONIAN DRUGS
  18. 18. CNS ANTIPARKINSONIAN DRUGS
  19. 19. QUESTION ? • Dopamine and Tyrosine Are Not Used for Parkinson Disease Therapy, Why? – Dopamine Doesn't Cross the Blood Brain Barrier – Huge amount of tyrosine decreases activity of rate limiting enzyme Tyrosine Hydroxylase
  20. 20. LEVODOPA • Single most effective agent in PD • Inactive by itself but immediate precursor of Dopamine • Peripherally - 95% is decarboxylated in peripheral tissues in gut and liver to dopamine – This dopamine acts on peripheral organs like heart, blood vessels and CTZ etc. (NOT CNS) • 1 - 2% crosses BBB, taken up by neurons and DA is formed – Stored and released as neurotransmitter
  21. 21. ACTIONS OF LEVODOPA – CNS • Effective in Eliminating Most of the Symptoms of Parkinson Disease (initially motor) – Bradykinesia and Rigidity Respond Quickly – Reduction in Tremor Effect with Continued therapy • Secondary symptoms - Handwritting , speech, facial expression and interest in life improves gradually • L -Dopa less Effective in Eliminating Postural Instability and Shuffling Gait Meaning Other Neurotransmitters are Involved in Parkinson Disease • Behavioural Effects: – Partially Changes Mood by elevating mood, and increases Patient sense of well being - General alerting response – Disproportionate increase in sexual activity – No improvement in dementia – psychiatric symptoms
  22. 22. ACTIONS OF LEVODOPA – CONTD. • CVS: – Cardiac Stimulation Due to Beta adrenergic effect on Heart – Though stimulates peripheral adrenergic receptor – no rise in BP – Orthostatic Hypotension - some individuals – central DA and NA action – In elderly cardiovascular problems - transient tachycardia, cardiac arrhythmias and hypertension – Tolerance to CVS action develops within few weeks • CTZ: DA receptors cause stimulation – nausea and vomiting – tolerance • Endocrine: Decrease in Prolactin level and increase in GH release
  23. 23. LEVODOPA - PHARMACOKINETICS • Absorbed rapidly from small intestine – aromatic amino acid transport system • High First Pass Effect – Competition for amino acids present in food competes for the carrier – Also depends on gastric emptying and pH • Peak plasma conc. 1-2 hrs and half life - 1 to 3 Hrs • Metabolized in liver and peripherally - secreted in urine unchanged or conjugated with glucoronyl sulfate • Central entry into CNS (1%) - mediated by membrane transporter for aromatic amino acids – competition with dietary protein • In CNS – Decarboxylated and DA is formed – therapeutic effectiveness • Transport back by presynaptic uptake or metabolized by MAO and COMT
  24. 24. LEVODOPA - PHARMACOKINETICS 3 – OMD COMT Levodopa DDC Dopamine Any drug which can reduce DDC peripherally (called peripheral decaroxylase inhibitors) - Would be beneficial and cause higher bioavailability, longer half-life, better availability in CNS and also reduce the daily dose of levodopa
  25. 25. LEVODOPA - ADRS • Initial Therapy:  Nausea and vomiting - 80% of patients  Postural hypotension , but asymptomatic : 30 % of patients tolerance develops – disappear after prolonged treatment  Cardiac arrhythmias (due to beta adrenergic action and peripheral CA synthesis) - tachycardia, ventricular extrasystoles and, rarely, atrial fibrillation  Exacerbation of angina
  26. 26. LEVODOPA (ADVERSE EFFECTS) - PROLONGED THERAPY 1. Abnormal movements: Facial tics, grimacing, tongue thrusting, choreoathetoid movements of limb after few months of treatment 2. Behavioural effects: – 20 to 25% of Population – Trouble in Thinking (Cognitive Effects) – L- dopa can induce: Anxiety, psychosis, confusion, hallucination, delusion – Hypomania - Inappropriate Sexual Behavior; "Dirty Old Man", "Flashers“ - Drug Holiday (1 - 3 weeks)
  27. 27. LEVODOPA (ADVERSE EFFECTS) - PROLONGED THERAPY – CONTD.  Fluctuation in Motor Performance:  Initial therapy – each dose - good duration of action 9more than half-life)  Suggesting Nigrostriatum retains capacity to store and release  Prolonged therapy – “buffering” capacity is lost – each dose causes fluctuation of motor state - each dose has short duration of action– short therapeutic effect (1 – 2 Hrs) – bradykinesia and rigidity comes back quickly - "On-off" Phenomenon  Like a Light Switch: Without Warning  DYSKINESIA – excessive abnormal involuntary movements even in on phase (more troublesome)  Dyskinesia often with high plasma conc. of levodopa  Dyskinesia = Bradykinesia and Rigidity in terms of patient comfortness
  28. 28. LEVODOPA (ADVERSE EFFECTS) - PROLONGED THERAPY – CONTD.  Denervation Supersensitivity: In Basal Ganglia – destruction of Dopaminergic Neurons –increase in Dopamine Receptors postsynaptically L Dopa Therapy - increase Dopamine at synaptic Cleft - but too many Receptors - Denervation Supersensitivity Effect - Increased Postsynaptic Transmission Initial disappearance of Parkinson Syndrome Onset of Dyskinesia
  29. 29. LEVODOPA – DRUG INTERACTIONS  Pyridoxine – abolishes therapeutic effect of levodopa  Antipsychotic Drugs – Phenothiazines, butyrophenone block the action of levodopa by blocking DA receptors.  Antidopeminergic – domperidone abolishes nausea and vomiting  Reserpine – blocks levodopa action by blocking vesicular uptake  Anticholinergics – synergistic action but delayed gastric emptying – reduced effect of levodopa  Nonspecific MAO Inhibitors – Prevents degradation of peripherally synthesized DA – hypertensive crisis by the tyramine-cheese effect (tyramine is found in cheese, coffee, beer, pickles and chocolate), when given to a person taking a MAO Inhibitor - tyramine is not broken down - tremendous release of Norepinephrine)
  30. 30. LEVODOPA VS PERIPHERAL DECARBOXYLASE INHIBITORS  Carbidopa and Benserazide: In practice, almost always administered Do not penetrate BBB Do not inhibit conversion of l-dopa to DA in brain Co-administration of Carbidopa - will decrease metabolism of l-dopa in GI Tract and peripheral tissues - increase l-dopa conc in CNS - meaning decrease l-dopa dose and also
  31. 31. LEVODOPA VS PERIPHERAL DECARBOXYLASE INHIBITORS – CONTD.  Benefits: Plasma t1/2 – prolonged Dose of levodopa – 30% reduction Reduction in systemic complications Nausea and Vomiting – less Cardiac – minimum complications Pyridoxine reversal of levodopa – do not occur On/Off effect – minimum Better overall improvement of patient
  32. 32. LEVODOPA – CARBIDOPA (MORE LEVODOPA AVAILABILITY IN CNS )
  33. 33. CNS ANTIPARKINSONIAN DRUGS
  34. 34. CNS -- ANTIPARKINSONIAN DRUGS PATIENT EDUCATION  “Wearing off” phenomenon – gradual worsening of symptoms as medication begins to lose effectiveness, despite maximal doses  “Drug Holiday” when levodopa no longer working effectively (usually 10-day period of hospitalization)  Community resources to assist patient and family  Safety  Effect on blood pressure –  Hypotension  Hypertensive crisis of MAOI accidentally taken  “Sleep attacks” – newer dopamine agonists (pramipexole & ropinirole)  GI: Constipation – high fiber, high roughage, increased fluids  GU: urine color changes – brownish-orange (entacapone)
  35. 35. CNS -- ANTIPARKINSONIAN DRUGS NURSING PROCESS  Nursing Actions  Exact timing of medication – cannot be administered late  Oral doses given with food  Avoid foods in Vit B6 – reverse effects of levodopa  Force fluids >2,000 mL/day  High roughage, high fiber diet
  36. 36. • Five Stages – Flexion of affected arm - tremor / leaning toward unaffected side – Slow shuffling gate – Increased difficulty walking – looks for support to prevent falls – Further progression of weakness – assistance with ambulation – Profound disability – may be confined to wheelchair
  37. 37. THANK YOU

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