Diese Präsentation wurde erfolgreich gemeldet.
Die SlideShare-Präsentation wird heruntergeladen. ×
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Nächste SlideShare
Store Layouts
Store Layouts
Wird geladen in …3
×

Hier ansehen

1 von 22 Anzeige

Weitere Verwandte Inhalte

Ähnlich wie Retail (20)

Aktuellste (20)

Anzeige

Retail

  1. 1. WHAT IS RETAIL? PROJECT NO.1
  2. 2. WHAT IS RETAIL? Retail: the sale of goods to the public in relatively small quantities for use or consumption rather than for resale. Retail design is primarily a specialized practice of architecture and interior design involved in the design of spaces that serve the retail business.
  3. 3. A retail store’s interior design must: • Align with and represent the brand’s personality and values. • Support marketing and sales activities, and facilitate commercial transactions. • Enable customers to view merchandise and inspect its fit, feel and function, and consult with in-store experts. • Provide a positive environment for shoppers and staff that encourage them to want to be in the space. • Facilitate efficient workflows and enhance productivity. • Display merchandise effectively and accessibly. • Ensure the safety and security of workers, shoppers and merchandise. • Afford adequate space for merchandise storage and non-customer-facing staff activities.
  4. 4. Retail stores patterns • Welcoming entry • Display fixtures • Store system • Props • Display Design • Easy access • Customer attraction • Store Front • Signage • Working place • Indoor/outdoor connection • Storage • Fitting Rooms • Support services • Colors • lighting • Kids Area • Bringing them all together
  5. 5. Welcoming Area The main entry is a very important element of retail shops design, first and foremost, the entry should be welcoming. It should be inviting and friendly, this welcoming aspect has to be balanced by the need to guide the client into the store and attract him to navigate into the store comfortably. • The counter: • Most of the owners prefer to locate the counter near the entrance where the clients can come and purchase the products, the counter is a focal point and should be easy to be found by the client.
  6. 6. COMFORT IS KEY – ERGONOMICS Signature element: A welcoming and inviting in a retail store should contain the signature element that speaks to what makes this shop special. display fixtures The island fixture: is a three-dimensional counter used for the display of a wide variety of accessories such as jewelery, scarves, and handbags as well as cosmetics. The slat wall fixture: is useful in displaying a variety of merchandise including apparel. Brackets of different kinds are used with the slat wall to display many kinds of merchandise. Freestanding fixtures: Freestanding fixtures provide customer access from all sides. The most standing fixtures are: 1- Two way 2- Four way
  7. 7. The different types of store layouts 1. Grid 2. Herringbone 3. Loop, or racetrack 4. Free-flow 5. Boutique 6. Straight, or spine 7. Diagonal 8. Angular 9. Geometric 10. Multiple, or mixed
  8. 8. GRID In a grid layout, merchandise is displayed on displays in long aisles where customers weave up and down, browsing as they go. The grid maximizes product display and minimizes white space—nearly every convenience store, pharmacy, and grocery store utilize this familiar layout. The grid is all about product, product, product. A standard grid layout looks something like this:
  9. 9. GRID Pros • Best for stores with lots of merchandise, especially when products are varied • Lots of exposure to products, as the layout encourages customers to browse multiple aisles • Familiar for shoppers • Predictable traffic flow means you can put promos where you know customers will see them • Lots of infrastructure suppliers, such as shelving, are available as this layout is used so much • Best practices within this layout are well researched Cons • Least likely to create an experiential retail space; this layout is a dime a dozen • Customers may be frustrated they can’t shortcut their way to what they need • Customers may not understand your product groupings, leading to frustration and questions (or worse, departure) • Few visual breaks and lots of merchandise can make customers feel overwhelmed • Cramped aisles often lead to customers bumping into one another
  10. 10. HERRINGBONE If you think the grid may be best for your merchandise but you have a very long, narrow retail space, the herringbone layout is one to consider. • Pros • Suited to stores with lots of product but minimal space • This layout often works well for warehouse-style stores open to the public • Cons • Limited visibility down “side roads” can increase shoplifting opportunities • Can feel cramped, and customers easily bump into one another
  11. 11. LOOP The loop, racetrack, or forced-path store layout takes the grid’s fairly predictable traffic flows a step further and creates a deliberate closed loop that leads customers from the front of the store, past every bit of merchandise, and then to the checkout. Customers are exposed to the most merchandise this way, but the path they take is controlled.
  12. 12. LOOP • Pros • Maximum product exposure • Most predictable traffic pattern; easiest to place promotions and have highest assurance they’ll be seen • Can be experiential—may work with retail where a journey makes sense and time spent in store doesn’t need to be brief • Cons • Customers don’t get to browse at will • May waste the time of customers who knows what they’ve come for; they may avoid this shop in the future when buying intent is specific • Not suited for shops that encourage high traffic turnover or carry products people need to spend little time considering before purchase
  13. 13. FREE-FLOW • The free-flow layout philosophy is almost a rejection of the others. With free-flow, there is no deliberate attempt to force customers through predictable traffic patterns: wandering is encouraged. Therefore, with free-flow, there are far fewer rules, but that doesn’t mean there aren’t any—don’t forget about the commonalities that are based on natural human behavior. • Pros • Great for small spaces • Also works within areas of loop and spine layouts (more on that below) • Creates more space between products • Less likelihood customers will bump into one another • Better suited to higher-end shops with less merchandise • Most likely to create an experiential retail space • Cons • Often less space to display product • Easy to forget there are best practices that still should be followed; breaking the unwritten rules can turn people off and away from your store • Can be confusing for customers
  14. 14. BOUTIQUE • The boutique store layout, also known as shop-in-shop or alcove layout, is a commonly used type of free-flow layout. Merchandise is separated by brand or category, encouraging shoppers to engage with complementary items in designated areas. Walls, product displays, and fixtures divide areas and create the feeling of small shops within one store. • Pros • Sparks curiosity in shoppers • Highlights different brands and product categories • Helps with cross merchandising and cross-selling • Cons • May limit the total display space for merchandise • Shoppers may not explore the entire store • Customers may be confused •
  15. 15. STRAIGHT (SPINE) • The straight store layout, also known as the spine layout, is easy to plan, effective, and creates space for customers to peruse your store. A basic straight design can help lure customers all the way to the back of the store, ensuring that all featured merchandise is seen. This is done with signage, product displays, and strategically placed merchandise to keep customers interested and moving down the main aisle of the shop. • This store design works for small markets, food stores, and department stores that use the spine as a main aisle to connect the various sections on each floor. • Pros • Customers are more likely to make it to the back of the store • Shoppers have space to look around • Allows for space to display merchandise • Cons • Shoppers may move quickly down the main aisle and merchandise at the front or sides of your store will go unseen • A straight aisle may not lend itself as well to exploration and discovering new products
  16. 16. DIAGNAL • Exactly as the name suggests, the diagonal store layout incorporates aisles placed at an angle to expose more merchandise to customers as they walk through the shop. It’s a variation of the grid layout and can help guide shoppers to the checkout counter. This store design is helpful for space management, making it a good option for retail stores with limited space. It also encourages more movement, so customers can easily circulate through the store and see all of the products you sell. • Pros • Better customer circulation • If the checkout counter is located in the center of the store, the diagonal layout provides better security—you’ll be able to see more throughout the store • Cons • Shoppers cannot take a shortcut to specific products • Narrower aisles are common in the diagonal store layout
  17. 17. ANGULAR • A better name for angular store layout would be “curved store layout.” “Angular” is deceptive, as this store layout includes rounded product displays, curved walls and corners, and other curved store fixtures to maintain the customer flow. • The angular layout uses free-standing product displays and can create the perception of higher quality merchandise, making it a good retail design option for luxury retailers and boutiques. • Pros • Creates a unique retail store design • Elevates the in-store experience • Cons • Rounded displays eliminate wall shelf space • Less inventory can be displayed
  18. 18. GEOMETRIC • The geometric store layout is a great way to combine creativity and functionality. It’s commonly used by retailers selling products targeted at stylish millennials and Gen Z. If your shop has a unique interior including support columns, wall angles, and ceiling design, a geometric layout can enhance the look of your store. • Pros • Creates a unique store design without a high cost • Helps make a statement about the products • Cons • May be too eccentric for less “trendy” products (or an older audience) • It may not be the best option to maximize space to display merchandise
  19. 19. MULTIPLE • You don’t have to select just one store layout. Some retailers use elements from multiple layouts to create a flexible store design, also known as a mixed layout. A dynamic mix of diagonal, straight, and angular store layouts can help you create a compelling in-store experience where customers naturally flow from one area to another.
  20. 20. PROPS • A prop is something used with a product in a display • that clarifies the function of the merchandise being sold • or the story being told. • Props are an integral part of a display. • They are used in visual merchandising to tell a • story about the product, the merchandise concept or the • store itself.
  21. 21. EASY ACCESS • 1. Easy access from the store entrance to all sales sections is very important. 2- The most valuable space is near the front of the store 3- Space on the first floor is more valuable than basement or upper floor 4- The space along the aisles is more valuable than the peripheral corner space , central aisles are more valuable from the peripheral or sides aisles 5-Eye-level space is more valuable than the space above and below eye level, especially for new items.
  22. 22. QUESTIONS?

×