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Divine safety final

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Divine safety final

  1. 1. NAME : DIVINE T SURNAME : MUDZENGI SCHOOL : AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES DEPARTMENT : FOOD SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY PROGRAMME : BSFST MODULE : FOOD SAFETY AND LEGISLATION LEVEL : 2:2 LECTURER : Dr MPOFU DUE DATE : 30/05/2014
  2. 2. TITLE: Food packaging and labelling OBJECTIVES: To assess labels on packaged food from different companies INTRODUCTION: Food labelling is important in food production, it provides basic information about what is in food and how best to handle it. Food labelling ensures customers to choose products depending on their preferences. Food labelling is considered important at national and international levels. Food safety is ensured by set of legislations and laws on labelling requirements for each product. Requirements of labels are the name of the food, a list of ingredients, quid declarations of characterising ingredients, the appropriate minimum durability, special storage instructions, name and address of manufacturer or packer, place of origin, instructions for use, batch number, genetically modified (GM) ingredients and weight or volume. Further requirements include indication of irradiated ingredients, indication of allergenic ingredients, additional requirements for: claims and nutrition labelling. Labels are presented normally on a wrapped paper around the product. (EUROPA Food Safety, 2013) Companies and individuals are not allowed to manufacture, distribute, sell, expose for sale or dispatch or deliver to any agent for of sale, any packaged food products which are not marked and labelled in the manner as be specified by regulations. Labels should not contain any statement, claim, design or device which is false or misleading in any particular concerning the food products in the package or concerning quantity or nutritive value implying medicinal or therapeutic claims or in relation to the place of origin of the food product. Every food business operator should ensure that the labelling and presentation of food, including shape, appearance or packaging, packaging materials used, manner in which they are arranged, the setting in which they are displayed, and the information available about them through whatever medium, does not mislead consumers. (Food Labels, 2011) The product date mark must be provided. It is an indication by the manufacturer of the length of time a food can be kept under the specified storage conditions. The aim of date mark labelling is to help consumers make safe and optimum use of food. There are two types of durability indication, these are ‘best before date’ and the ‘use by’. Best before will be appropriate for the vast majority of foods and indicates the period for which a food can reasonably be expected to retain its optimal condition for example ‘it will not be stale’ and so relates to the quality of the food. Use by is the required form of date mark for those foods which are highly perishable from a microbiological point of view and which are in consequence likely after a relatively short period to present a risk of food poisoning, and so relates to the safety of the food. The date mark as a mandatory particular must comply with clear labelling requirements and be conspicuous, legible and indelible. Black inkjet on a dark green background, for example, is not acceptable; nor ink-jet onto pictures or other writing. A product with a ‘use by’ date cannot be sold after that date and should not be used after midnight of that day. It is an offence to alter or remove a date mark if you are not the manufacturer, packer or seller originally responsible for marking the food. (Food Standards Agents, 2012)
  3. 3. Allergen information is provided on all food whether sold prepacked or loose. For prepacked foods, the 8 most common allergens; crustaceans, eggs, fish, milk, peanuts, soybeans, tree nuts, sesame seeds and their products should be highlighted on the ingredient list if present. Drinks with high caffeine content except coffee or tea have to be labelled as not recommended for children, pregnant and breastfeeding women, with the actual caffeine content quoted. Meat and fish products that look like a cut, joint or slice and contain more than 5% added water have to show this in the name of the food. The types of vegetable oil used in food must be stated. For milk and milk products it should be stated if lactose intolerant individuals can consume the product. If this information is not provided and there is an incident reported then the original producer or packager is questioned and sometimes can be sued or banned. (Food Labels, 2011) The nutrients in the product should be included and presented per 100g/ml or per portion. Further information can be added to labels such as the amounts of polyunsaturates, monounsaturates, starch, cholesterol, vitamins or minerals. Sodium is listed as salt which provides a better understanding of the amount of which is in the food product, in relation to public health guidelines. Additional information can include; specific vitamins and minerals listed in the regulation and presented in significant amounts at least 15% in food products and 7.5% in drinks, polyols, starch and fibre. (EUROPA Food Safety, 2013) GDA labels include the Guideline Daily Amount for certain nutrients and the percentage (%) GDA provided by 100g or 1 portion.This can be used to compare products and to choose the one which best suits the consumer, for example finding the one with the lowest salt content. GDA values for adult women are used for food labels because these values were developed for the nutrients often consumed in excess, they represent amounts that should not be exceeded on a regular basis; however, people’s needs do vary. The values for women are used as they are slightly lower than those for men. The nutrient levels therefore also help to identify food which might lead to obesity or other health side effects. (Food Labels, 2011) Contact details should be provided. These include the physical address of the packager or producer, name of manufacturer, email address and telephone numbers, they should be clearly stated on the label. This may be required for tracking product source in case a problem arises caused by the food product. This helps ensure food safety and follow up to correct certain practices that are linked to labelling of food. The physical address can be used in case there has to be a survey on packaging practises of a company even if there has been no problem identified or even to applaud the company labelling practices. (Food Standards Agents, 2012) A barcode should always be present on the label. The first 3 digits of the barcode state the country of origin of product and the rest are for the specific producer of product. Barcodes are present on all food labels and they ensure traceability of food substances and recall. Food is recalled when it poses a possible health and safety risk to consumers. The leak test is carried out to ensure that all liquid packed foods are not leaking. If tinned food is not tightly closed it can allow entry of foreign substances such as microbes and air. Entrance of air in food with acid and material used is a metal leads to reaction between the acid and metal. (Geffen, 2003) The reaction of acids and metals leads to salt and hydrogen production, hydrogen production leads to bulging in canned foods. Some poisonous compounds can be formed upon reaction of canned foods with air; cases of deaths have been reported especially related to tinned beans and fish. A temper proof should be present on tinned foods also. Temper proofs ensure that product
  4. 4. has not been opened or used before. Temper proofs render food safe for consumption and that it will not cause an adverse health effects prior to consumption. The use and preparation methods should be stated. Some examples of use instructions are ‘cook it thoroughly’, do not skip the standing time’ (stated on pack), these are important for certain foods and should be followed by users. (Geffen, 2003) METHODOLOGY Products from different producers were assessed checking if all labelling requirements were met on the packages. Results were collected and recommendations given where necessary. RESULTS Results are attached at the back DISCUSSION AND RECOMENDATIONS The packaging requirements for most countries are the same. Packaging standards all aid in maintaining food safety. Food safety is an important sector of nutrition as well and this is linked through food packaging systems. All products should be randomly checked for all required labels on packages. Food labeling should be compulsory for all packagers and producers. Some labels should be stated to be the essentials always required and some can be optional. Separating optional and essential labels is important to allow high productivity of food even by small companies and allows individuals concerned with safety of food they consume to choose where they obtain their food. The labeling standards when not met by the packaging companies then the companies should be punished either by payment or banning the company from producing food products. The packaging requirements for most countries are the same. Packaging standards all aid in maintaining food safety. All products should be randomly checked for all required labels on packages. Health claims should be enforced and made compulsory by the standards to be on packaged food to increase food safety and health promotion. Health claims are statements that link eating a specific food with reducing the risk of an illness or disease, such as ‘eating low fat yoghurt reduces your risk of osteoporosis. Currently it is illegal to use health claims. The only exception to this is food with added folate. Manufacturers are allowed to state that eating folate just before conception and during pregnancy helps to reduce the risk of spina bifida in babies. The labeling standards when not met by the packaging companies then the companies should be sued. Payment or banning the company from producing food products can be vital upon false labeling or failure. Consumers should be educated on steps to take when they have problems with the labels on food. Educating consumers on importance of labels is also essential and it increases food safety and awareness of the consumers. Consumers should also be educated o how to deal with a case of food poisoning, presence of contaminants in packaged food or adulteration as per set regulations. CONCLUSION Food packaging is important in food production. Labelling ensures food safe for consumption if done in the correct required format.
  5. 5. REFERENCES EUROPA Food Safety. (2013, january 19). Retrieved may 20, 2014, from EUROPA Food Safety Web site: http://www.europa.eu.co.uk Food Labels. (2011, may 18). Retrieved MAY 24, 2014, from Food Labels Web site: http://www.foodsafety.com Food Standards Agents. (2012, june 19). Retrieved may 27, 2014, from Food Standards Agents Web site: http://www.food.gov.uk Geffen, D. (2003). Nutrition Education Website. Retrieved May 21, 2014, from file:///C:/Users/DEMO/Desktop/nutri/dietassess.htm

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