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Teaching English In English

Plenary at the 2019 TESOL Colombia conference. A call for a new approach

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Teaching English In English

  1. 1. TEACHING ENGLISH IN ENGLISH A call for a new approach to teacher English fluency development May 2019 Bridge Education Group, Inc. Proprietary and confidential. Do not distribute. 1 David Deubelbeiss
  2. 2. Bridge Education Group, Inc. Proprietary and confidential. Do not distribute. 2 A STORY
  3. 3. Bridge Education Group, Inc. Proprietary and confidential. Do not distribute. 3 The 2 nd Language Teacher’s Brain - It’s not enough to have a high level of general fluency in the 2 nd language - There’s language specific to teaching in English, a teacher must know - A teacher needs to know HOW to teach in a 2 nd language as a 2 nd language “brained” teacher.
  4. 4. Bridge Education Group, Inc. Proprietary and confidential. Do not distribute. 4 T R E N D S Increased government investment More English only instruction (EMI) Lower start age of English language learners Increased investment in teacher preparation Decline of “native speakerism” More focus on the “local” teacher
  5. 5. Bridge Education Group, Inc. Proprietary and confidential. Do not distribute. 5 “Reports suggest that there are relatively few state school classrooms anywhere in which most learners are developing a useable knowledge of English.” (Weddel, 2011:3)
  6. 6. Bridge Education Group, Inc. Proprietary and confidential. Do not distribute. 6
  7. 7. Bridge Education Group, Inc. Proprietary and confidential. Do not distribute. 7 David Nunan How can we support classroom teachers so that most learners are developing a useable knowledge of English? The Impact of English as a Global Language on Educational Policies and Practices in the Asia‐Pacific Region
  8. 8. Bridge Education Group, Inc. Proprietary and confidential. Do not distribute. 8 What the typical English language teacher needs to be able to do. Taken from: https://teachingenglish.english.britishcouncil.org/assess-my-skills Teacher Competencies
  9. 9. Bridge Education Group, Inc. Proprietary and confidential. Do not distribute. 9 “… all decisions as to content and method are based on the learner’s reason for learning.” (Hutchinson & Waters, 1992,:19) An English For Specific Purposes Approach
  10. 10. Bridge Education Group, Inc. Proprietary and confidential. Do not distribute. 10 A “bound” ESP (English for Specific Purposes) approach. Teachers learn the English language skills a teacher needs to be able to prepare and enact the lesson in a standardized (usually national) curriculum in English in a way that is recognizable and understandable to other speakers of the language’ (Young et al., 2014: 5)
  11. 11. Bridge Education Group, Inc. Proprietary and confidential. Do not distribute. 11 Having these language resources at their disposal in the classroom can address – and perhaps even help to overcome – the teachers’ feelings of professional deficit that they are not ‘fluent enough’ to teach in English and thus that they are not meeting the public perception of ‘being a good ELT teacher’. Donald Freeman
  12. 12. Bridge Education Group, Inc. Proprietary and confidential. Do not distribute. 12 Why Teach English In English? Communication. Rich Input Student Motivation. Linguistic Modeling
  13. 13. Bridge Education Group, Inc. Proprietary and confidential. Do not distribute. 13 Teacher Expectancy
  14. 14. Bridge Education Group, Inc. Proprietary and confidential. Do not distribute. 14 A Teaching English In English Course 1. WHO Is this course designed for? 1. WHAT is the essential classroom language a teacher needs to learn? 1. HOW will teachers practice and learn the essential language?
  15. 15. Bridge Education Group, Inc. Proprietary and confidential. Do not distribute. 15 1. May or may not use English partially or completely as the medium of instruction, although he or she is familiar with the curricular content. 2. Is familiar with classroom routines, including basic classroom management and teaching strategies, and can carry out these classroom tasks and routines that are predictable. 3. Is expected to use a defined (often nationally prescribed) curriculum. 4. Draws English language support from instructional materials. 5 Is teaching students who are at the beginning or intermediate levels of general English 6. Uses English to interact with students in simple and predictable ways
  16. 16. Bridge Education Group, Inc. Proprietary and confidential. Do not distribute. 16 1. What are the things teachers need to be able to do when teaching in English – establish routines, give instructions, manage the class, provide feedback etc … 2. What language (words, expressions, grammar) do teachers need in order to carry out those practices in English in the classroom Ex. Classroom commands: Clean up your desk. Return to your seats. See me after class. Turn to page 118. Stop what you are doing.
  17. 17. Bridge Education Group, Inc. Proprietary and confidential. Do not distribute. 17 1. Situational context. Practice and use the language in a teaching context. 2. Listening and speaking activities focus. 3. Vocabulary study of essential ESP teaching terms. 4. Skills & Delivery Training. Strategies. Lesson design etc … 5 Blend of online practice, self-paced study and in-school mentorship
  18. 18. Bridge Education Group, Inc. Proprietary and confidential. Do not distribute. 18 Teaching Knowledge & Experience Language Fluency & Experience Teaching English IN English Change the focus from general knowledge to classroom performance. What teachers “can do” in English in their classroom and not a standardized test score. English Language Teacher Assessment Discipline Knowledge Linguistic Knowledge
  19. 19. Bridge Education Group, Inc. Proprietary and confidential. Do not distribute. 19 Freeman, Donald (2017), The Case For Teachers’ Classroom English Proficiency. “English level at Japan's secondary schools falls short of government target”, The Japan Times, April 16th, 2019. Online. Hattie, J. (2015): The Applicability of Visible Learning to Higher Education. In: Scholarship of Teaching and Learning in Psychology, 1 (1), 79-91. Hutchinson, T. & Waters, A. (1987). English for Specific Purposes: A learner-centered approach. Nunan, David (2003). The Impact of English as a Global Language on Educational Policies and Practices in the Asia‐Pacific Region. Weddell, M. 2011. ‘More than just “technology”: English language teaching initiatives as complex changes’ in H. Coleman (ed.). Dreams and Realities: Developing Countries and the English Language (Paper 13). London: British Council. Young, JW, Freeman, D, Hauck, M, Garcia Gomez, P, Papageorgiou, S (2014) A Design Framework for the ELTeach Program Assessments. Princeton, NJ: Educational Testing Service. References
  20. 20. Thank You! Bridge Education Group, Inc. Proprietary and confidential. Do not distribute. 20 Contact Us https://bridge.edu/tefl/contact-us

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