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Event Driven Architectures with Apache Kafka on Heroku

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Apache Kafka is the backbone for building architectures that deal with billions of events a day. Chris Castle, Developer Advocate, will show you where it might fit in your roadmap.

- What Apache Kafka is and how to use it on Heroku
- How Kafka enables you to model your data as immutable streams of events, introducing greater parallelism into your applications
- How you can use it to solve scale problems across your stack such as managing high throughput inbound events and building data pipelines

Learn more at https://www.heroku.com/kafka

Reveal.js version of slides: http://slides.com/christophercastle/deck#/

Veröffentlicht in: Software

Event Driven Architectures with Apache Kafka on Heroku

  1. 1. Event Driven Architectures with Apache Kafka on Heroku Chris Castle, Developer Advocate Rand Fitzpatrick, Director of Product November 3, 2016
  2. 2. What problems does Apache Kafka solve? What are the core concepts of Kafka? Why Apache Kafka on Heroku?
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  4. 4. What problems does Apache Kafka solve?
  5. 5. Event-Driven Architecture Event-driven architecture (EDA), also known as message-driven architecture, is a software architecture pattern promoting the production, detection, consumption of, and reaction to events. Source: Wikipedia
  6. 6. What Are Events? Context When was the event? (event time, process time)? What produced the event? (causal history, device, etc) Where did the event occur? (system location, geo location) Operation What function was applied? (create, update, delete, etc) What are the characteristics of the function? State What is the data involved in the event? How is that data identified? "Contextualized operation on state"
  7. 7. Event Examples Product views Completed sales Page visits Site logins Shipping notifications Inventory received IoT sensor values Weather data Traffic data Tweets Election polling data! Completed sale 2016-11-03T15:13:27Z Retail www site referrer Google search Inventory item purchased Amazon Echo, Black $179.99 ID B00X4WHP5E Context Operation State
  8. 8. Why Should I Care? Scaling too slowly leads to dropped data Overprovisioning leads to inefficient systems Dataflow between processing stages requires coordination Parallel pipelines with the same data can be nontrivial Service discovery must support current and future processes Sequencing service availability is critical to system function Possible loss of state when individual services fail
  9. 9. Why Should I Care? Inbound Streams Scaling too slowly leads to dropped data Overprovisioning leads to inefficient systems Backpressure and other coordination is hard! Data Pipelines Dataflow between processing stages requires coordination Parallel pipelines with the same data can be nontrivial Provenance and auditability!? Microservices Service discovery must support current and future processes Sequencing service availability is critical to system function Possible loss of state when individual services fail
  10. 10. Why Should I Care? Inbound Streams Event streams in Kafka allow other resources to pull when ready Resources can fail and reconnect without dropping events Kafka provides elasticity, reducing the need for backpressure Data Pipelines Dataflow coordination is reduced via event stream structure The immutability of data allows for trivial parallel processing Tracking provenance and lineage of data becomes possible Microservices Services now only need to discover topics in Kafka Service availability sequencing is relaxed Inter-service communication is more robust
  11. 11. Use Cases Heroku Platform Event Stream Learn more at https://blog.heroku.com/powering-the-heroku-platform-api-a-distributed-systems-approach-using-streams-and-apache-kafka
  12. 12. Use Cases Heroku Operational Experience: App Metrics
  13. 13. Use Cases Heroku App Metrics Learn more at https://engineering.heroku.com/blogs/2016-05-26-heroku-metrics-there-and-back-again/
  14. 14. Use Cases Twitter Analytics Dashboard
  15. 15. Use Cases Generalized Inbound Streams Data Pipelines Microservices Platform Event Stream App Metrics Twitter Analytics
  16. 16. What are the core concepts of Kafka?
  17. 17. Apache Kafka Core Concepts PRODUCERS CONSUMERS ​Brokers The instances running Kafka and managing streams of events in a cluster. ​Producers + Consumers Clients that write to or read from a Kafka cluster. ​Topics Streams of events that are replicated across the brokers. Configured with time based retention or log compaction. ​Partitions Discrete subsets of topics, and important tuning points for parallelism and ordering. BROKER TOPIC PARTITION
  18. 18. Example Producers Product views Completed sales Page visits Site logins Shipping notifications Inventory received IoT data Weather data Traffic data Tweets Election polling data! Web server Payment processor Browser Authentication service Shipping provider Warehouse Motion sensor Rain gauge Vehicle sensor Twitter Online/phone survey
  19. 19. Personalization engine Accounting system Reporting dashboard Security audit service Shipping provider Inventory database Actuator Climate model Traffic map Analytics dashboard Election forecast Example Consumers Product views Completed sales Page visits Site logins Shipping notifications Inventory received IoT data Weather data Traffic data Tweets Election polling data!
  20. 20. Complex Architecture
  21. 21. Complex Controls TOPIC PARTITION Other Kafka primitives to provide structure to Kafka event streams Retention Log compaction Replication factor Delivery guarantees
  22. 22. Interacting with Kafka and many more...
  23. 23. Kafka Connect Some examples: HDFS, JDBC, Elasticsearch, Couchbase, Oracle, MS SQL Server, Cassandra, DynamoDB, Salesforce Streaming API, Splunk Image credit: Confluent Kafka Connect announcement blog post
  24. 24. Why Apache Kafka on Heroku?
  25. 25. Without Heroku Apache Kafka The heart of the event management system, with a broad variety of configurations and options. Apache Zookeeper The system’s consensus and coordination cluster is vital for Kafka’s operation. OS + JVM Tuning Tuning the cluster runtimes can be an art. Instances + Networking Physical or virtual, the infrastructure behind clusters must be well considered. Myriad Moving Pieces
  26. 26. Apache Kafka on Heroku Simple Configuration
  27. 27. Apache Kafka on Heroku Automated Operations
  28. 28. Apache Kafka on Heroku Experienced Staff Self-Healing Current Version No-Downtime Upgrades Heroku engineers have contributed patches to the core open source Kafka project.
  29. 29. Apache Kafka on Heroku Global US West US East Ireland Germany Japan Sydney
  30. 30. Let's Review... ...and get you started with Kafka! Apache Kafka is a valuable tool for building architectures to support inbound event streams, data processing pipelines, and microservices coordination. The primitives provided by Kafka -- topics, partitions, retention duration, log compaction, and replication -- provide the tools to manage structured event streams. Apache Kafka on Heroku simplifies operational complexity so that any developer can get started quickly and feel confident that their application is supported by a rock-solid, production service. Get started at hrku.co/use-kafka
  31. 31. Q&A Rand Fitzpatrick, Director of Product Chris Castle, Developer Advocate But first, please take one minute to answer a few quick questions so we can make webinars like this even better for you.
  32. 32. Learn More Apache Kafka on Heroku Get Started Documentation Kafka Event Stream Modeling Podcast: Managed Kafka with Heroku Engineer Tom Crayford https://www.heroku.com/kafka https://elements.heroku.com/addons/heroku-kafka https://devcenter.heroku.com/articles/kafka-on-heroku https://devcenter.heroku.com/articles/kafka-event-stream-modeling http://softwareengineeringdaily.com/2016/10/25/managed-kafka- with-tom-crayford/
  33. 33. Thank you!

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