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An Assessment of Multiple Health Indicators among Youth in Michoacán, Mexico

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Veröffentlicht am

2nd Binational Conference, Nov. 15-16, 2017
UTSA Downtown Campus
Steven Hoffman, Ph.D. and Heidi Rueda, Ph.D., Assistant Professors, UTSA Department of Social Work

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An Assessment of Multiple Health Indicators among Youth in Michoacán, Mexico

  1. 1. An Assessment of Multiple Health Indicators among Youth in Michoacán, Mexico Process and Preliminary Outcomes from a Binational Research Collaboration Dr. Steven Hoffman and Dr. Heidi Adams Rueda University of Texas at San Antonio Department of Social Work
  2. 2. The Initial Partnership Dr. Hoffman  Lived in Chihuahua, Mexico for 2 years  Research emphasis on health literacy and health disparities among global Spanish-speaking youth populations  Quantitative research emphasis  New Assistant Professor Dr. Adams Rueda  Graduated with B.A. in Spanish, taught Spanish  Research emphasis on healthy interpersonal and dating relationships among Mexican- American teenagers  Qualitative research emphasis  New Assistant Professor
  3. 3. Bi-National Collaboration
  4. 4. • Formed a collaboration with a school psychologist in Michoacán, Mexico International Extension
  5. 5. Procedures & Sampling  Methods Recruitment of bilingual research assistants Translation/back-translation and piloting of mixed method instruments with leadership team in Michoacán Emails, phone calls, and video trainings Youth (N=123) took a written survey & oral health assessment  Eight focus groups (N=98 youth) divided by age (M age = 13.94) and sex (5 male groups, 3 female) on topics of teen dating violence and health
  6. 6. Results Mental Well-being Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well-being Scale among Youth in Mexico (Published in International Social Work) Migration and US Perceptions Someday would you like to go and live in the US? Yes = 83% Someday would you like to go and work in the US? Yes = 74% How do you think life is like in the US? Hard=11%; Happy or fun=14%; Dangerous=6%; Normal=46% I don’t know=22%
  7. 7. Results: Focus Groups on Romantic Relationships What makes a relationship healthy?  Key themes mirrored those of Mexican American youth: honesty, respect, faithfulness, free of violence  More focused on traditional gendered roles  Boys, in particular, did not want to be ordered around, manipulated, or lectured (machismo). They also did not like it when girls boasted about themselves (desired marianismo from counterpart). “Does not order me around.”  “Que no me mande.” “Que no me mangonee.” “That she does not boast a lot…” “Que no se crea mucho...”
  8. 8. Results: Focus Groups on Romantic Relationships  What makes a relationship unhealthy?  Again, themes mirrored those of Mexican American youth, with more focus on traditional gender roles, one-sided violence (male-initiated) and (male-initiated) sexual violence as female “proof of love”.  Topics similar to Mexican American youth: Cheating and jealousy  Processes involved more pronounced gender roles: Dominance/control theme (as opposed to escalating anger/communication skills – situational violence) Doing what the boy tells the girl to do Male-initiated physical violence “That a man wants to hit the woman.” “Que un hombre le quiere pegar a la mujer.” Male-initiated sexual violence resulted from females not “proving their love” (sexually)
  9. 9. Works in Progress  A first look at the Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well-being Scale among youth in Mexico  What is the relationship between adolescent health (i.e., HL, HRQoL, healthy interpersonal relationships) and migration aspirations?  What is the relationship between internal or external religiosity and migration aspirations?  Are migration aspirations a marker of cumulative stressors?  Do migration aspirations associate with other known risk factors (e.g., depression, substance use) to predict teen dating violence? Is this relationship moderated by familismo?
  10. 10. Thank you Steven.Hoffman@utsa.edu Heidi.Rueda@utsa.edu

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