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O lovely fishermaiden

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O lovely fishermaiden

  1. 1. What can you say about the following pictures?
  2. 2. Heinrich Heine was one of the most significant German poets of the 19th century. He was also a journalist, essayist, and literary critic. He is best known outside Germany for his early lyric poetry, which was set to music in the form of (art songs) by composers such as Robert Schumann and Franz Schubert.
  3. 3. O Lovely Fishermaiden O lovely Fishermaiden, Come, bring your boat to land And we will sit together And whisper, hand in hand
  4. 4. O lovely Fishermaiden, And fear no harm from me, You give your body daily, Unfearing to the sea My heart is like an ocean With storm and ebb and flow And many a pearly treasures Burns in the depth below
  5. 5. Beb - decline,fail Nrnuaeifg-not afraid Ebb Unfearing
  6. 6. O lovely Fishermaiden, Come, bring your boat to land And we will sit together And whisper, hand in hand
  7. 7. O lovely Fishermaiden, And fear no harm from me, You give your body daily, Unfearing to the sea
  8. 8. My heart is like an ocean With storm and ebb and flow And many a pearly treasures Burns in the depth below
  9. 9. What do you think is the message of the poem?
  10. 10. Do you think that the Fishermaiden is a bit afraid to give her love to the persona? Why?
  11. 11. In today’s generation what do you think is the importance of trust in a relationship?
  12. 12. What are the lines in the poem that convinced the maiden to give in to the persona addressing her?
  13. 13. How would a person convince you to say “yes” to him/her in case of relationships, sharing of secrets. Etc.
  14. 14. What is your initial reaction when someone has broken your trust with him/her?
  15. 15. How do you show your love to someone?
  16. 16. What is Rhythm? Rhythm means the rise and fall in the stress of the syllable. It implies the up and down motion or a rise, pause, and a fall.
  17. 17.  Rhythm refers to the pattern of sounds made by varying the stressed and unstressed syllables in a poem.  Rhythm also means the beat or pattern of sound created in a poem. Thus, this produces the haunting melody as a characteristic of poetry especially in lyric poetry, but all types of poetry depend on sound values.
  18. 18. Some poems are grand and echoey; others are sweet and slow; rich in lingering cadences; still others are like mournful lamentations; and others give an impression of strong vigorous movements.  Rhythm gives a song-like quality to poems. In fact songs are poems set to music.
  19. 19. Iamb: An unstressed syllable followed by a stressed syllable: “to day, again” I went to turn the grass once after one Who mowed it in the dew before the sun. (“The Tuft of Flowers” by Robert Frost)
  20. 20. Trochee: A stressed syllable followed by an unstressed syllable: “ car ry, mar ry, ma ny” Peter, Peter pumpkin-eater Had a wife and couldn't keep her. "Peter Peter Pumpkin Eater"
  21. 21. Dactyl: A stressed syllable followed by two unstressed syllables: “ diff icult, diff erent, every day” Just for a handful of silver he left us Just for a riband to stick in his coat (Robert Browning’s “The Lost Leader)
  22. 22. Anapest: Two unstressed syllables followed by a stressed syllable: “it is time, picayune (of little importance) ” Twas the night before Christmas and all through the house
  23. 23. Hickory Dickory Dock- Dactly Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star- Trochee Humpty Dumpty, Trochee; on the wall, a great fall Anapest Jack and Jill -Trochee
  24. 24. Direction: Identify whether the following lines are Iambic, Trochee, Dactyl or Anapest 1. O lovely Fishermaiden Come, bring your boat to land 2. I wandered, lonely as a cloud That floats on high o’er dales and hills 3. Should you ask me, whence these stories? Whence these legends and traditions,
  25. 25. 4. The Assyrian came down like a wolf on the fold And his cohorts were gleaming in purple and gold 5. Half a league, half a league Half a league onward, 6. Though wise men at their end know dark is right Because their words had forked no lightning 7. With the odours of the forest, With the dew and damp of meadows,
  26. 26. 8. And the sheen of their spears was like stars on the sea When the blue wave rolls nightly on deep Galilee. 9. And those that fled and that followed from the foa-pale distance broke. The immortal desire of immortals we saw in their faces and sighed. 10. All in the valley of Death Rode the six hundred.
  27. 27. 1. O lovely Fishermaiden Come, bring your boat to land (Iambic) 2. I wandered, lonely as a cloud That floats on high o’er dales and hills (Iambic) 3. Should you ask me, whence these stories? Whence these legends and traditions, (Trochee)
  28. 28. 4. The Assyrian came down like a wolf on the fold And his cohorts were gleaming in purple and gold (Anapaest) 5. Half a league, half a league Half a league onward, (Dactyl) 6. Though wise men at their end know dark is right Because their words had forked no lightning (Iambic)
  29. 29. 7. With the odours of the forest, With the dew and damp of meadows, (Trochee) 8. And the sheen of their spears was like stars on the sea When the blue wave rolls nightly on deep Galilee. (Anapaest) 9. And those that fled and that followed from the foa-pale distance broke. The immortal desire of immortals we saw in their faces and sighed. (Anapaest) 10. All in the valley of Death Rode the six hundred. (Dactyl)

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