Stress and Worker Safety by Pennsylvania L&I

Atlantic Training, LLC.
Atlantic Training, LLC.EHS Safety Training Solutions um Atlantic Training, LLC.
Stress and Worker Safety
1PPT-153-01
Bureau of Workers’ Compensation
PA Training for Health & Safety
(PATHS)
Stress Defined
“A state resulting from a stress, especially: one of
bodily or mental tension resulting from factors that
tend to alter an existent equilibrium.”
Stressed-out:
“Suffering from high levels
of physical or especially
psychological stress.”
Merriam Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary.
2PPT-153-01
Bad Stressors
Internal and external impacts. Things we can not
confront or refuse to confront.
 Broken Promises
 Overburdening workloads
 Hectic schedules
 Angry verbal exchanges
 Abusive Management
 Things outside your control
3PPT-153-01
Good Stressors
Positive reactions:
 Ability to react to events
 Managing schedules
 Situational awareness
 Dealing with people: staff and clients
Short term stress can be a means for you to react
successfully to a situation to promote your safety
4PPT-153-01
Daily Stressors
Things we are forced to consider daily:
 Driving hazards (people and road)
 Interactions with coworkers and public
 Sudden schedule changes
 Lack of or poor communications
 Active Shooter possibility
 Terrorist attacks
5PPT-153-01
Causes of Stress
Drs. Holmes and Rahe developed Life Change Units
to determine the impact of stressors in a person’s
life.
Areas considered to impact a person and health risks
assigned include the areas of:
 Work Events
 Personal Issues
 Financial State
 Social Condition
 Family Concerns
 Current events
6PPT-153-01
Identifying Your Stressors
Drs. Holmes and Rahe took the following impacts
into account for their study. Over a 24 month
period, these impacts were viewed.
 Family
 Finances
 Recreation
 Physical reactions
 Emotional reactions
 Psychological reactions
7PPT-153-01
Stress Warning Signs
Look for the following developing in yourself and
co-workers:
 Isolation
 Deterioration of personal appearance
 Loss of interest
 Carelessness
 Poor work quality
 Increased absenteeism
 Lowered productivity
8PPT-153-01
Stress Warning Checklist
DOT memo to “All Regional Flight Surgeons”
1. Deterioration of personal appearance
2. Self-Imposed Isolation
3. Mood Swings
4. Borrowing Money from Friends/Peers
5. Radical Loss/Gain of Weight
6. Deterioration of Morale
(A 1984 memo which is still relevant)
9PPT-153-01
Stress Warning Checklist
7. Complaints of Fatigue
8. Lowered Productivity
9. Loss of Interest in Promotions
10. Performance Deficiencies
11. Apathy
12. Poor Concentration
10PPT-153-01
Stress Warning Checklist
13. Irritability
14. Taking Needless Risks
15. Vague Complaints of Illness
16. Carelessness
17. Extended Lunch Breaks
18. High Accident Rate
11PPT-153-01
Stress Warning Checklist
19. Complaints of Personal and Family Problems
20. Unexplained Disappearances from the Work
Place
21. Sporadic Work Pace
22. Inconsistent Work Quality
23. Increased Lateness
24. Increased Absenteeism
25. Loss of Driving License
12PPT-153-01
Effects of Stress
 Job concentration disrupted
 Self-initiative reduced
 Trust in others diminished
 Resentment
 Depression
 Health problems: stroke
 Burn-out
13PPT-153-01
Burn-Out Defined
Burn-Out is a mental and physical fatigue
resulting from the constancy of dedication and
effort to a project.
Symptoms of Burn-Out:
 Emotional exhaustion
 Cutting back involvement with others
 Depersonalization
 Feeling reduced personal accomplishment
14PPT-153-01
United Kingdom Study
Most stressful working environments found to be:
 Recruitment Consultants 82%
 Legal profession 78%
 Education 73%
 Marketing 71%
 Health 70%
 Finance 68%
 Housewives 64%
73% of UK workforce felt stress was a result of work
15PPT-153-01
UK Study Coping Methods
Methods found for dealing with stress:
 Get angry 47%
 Eat more 43%
 Cry 38%
 Drink more 34%
 Smoke more 23%
16PPT-153-01
Dangerous Coping Methods
Stroke in Business Report, 2008, UK
People turned to alcohol, smoking and comfort
eating, each which can lead to high blood
pressure and possibly a stroke.
Most likely to drink more (59%) and eat more
(59%) although the group most likely to exercise
(18%) to reduce stress.
(Stroke is the third highest killer in the UK)
17PPT-153-01
US Stress Study
“Has stress from work ever driven you to a job
change?” 6,700 U.S. responses found:
 42% of respondents answered “I have purposely
changed jobs due to a stressful work
environment”
 35% of respondents answered “I thought about
changing my job because of a stressful work
environment”
 23% of respondents answered “I have never
changed my job specifically due to a stressful
work environment”
18PPT-153-01
US Stress Study
From 900 responses:
The most commonly reported workplace stressors
 Supervisor relationship (40%)
 Amount of work (39%)
 Work-life balance (34%)
 Coworker relationships (31%)
19PPT-153-01
US Stress Study
From 900 responses:
61% of respondents believe that workplace stress
has been the cause of an illness
46% of respondents have missed time at work due
to work-related stress
7% report illness so severe it caused hospitalization
20PPT-153-01
US Stress Study
84% of respondents claim that their stressful job
has impacted their personal lives
26% report sleepless nights
24% report depression
21% report family or relationship issues
19% report physical ailments
21PPT-153-01
U.S. Coping Methods
The most common methods of coping with work-
related stress include:
 Talking to a friend/colleague/spouse (55%)
 Exercising (40%)
 Eating (35%)
 Stepping away from work (35%)
 Taking a day off (32%)
 Drinking after work (24%)
22PPT-153-01
US Coping Methods
When asked “What does your
office do to help alleviate stress
in the workplace?”
 13% “extra time-off”
 11% “ability to work from home”
 66% answered “nothing.”
23PPT-153-01
Job Stress Defined
Job stress
 Harmful physical and emotional responses that
occur when the requirements of the job do not
match the capabilities, resources, or needs of
the worker.
According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics,
workers who must take time off work because of
stress, anxiety, or a related disorder will be off
the job for about 20 days.
24PPT-153-01
Job Stress
Worker Characteristics versus Working
Conditions
Reducing the effects of stressful working
conditions include the following:
 Balance between work and family or personal
life
 A support network of friends and coworkers
 A relaxed and positive outlook
25PPT-153-01
Results of Job Stress
 Cardiovascular Disease
 MSD disorders
 Psychological disorders
 Workplace injury
 Suicide, Cancer, ulcers,
impaired immune function
26PPT-153-01
Job Stress Reduction
 Design of work tasks
 Management styles
 Interpersonal relationships
 Workloads
 Career concerns
 Environmental conditions
27PPT-153-01
Dealing with Job Stress
 Stress Management Programs
 Organizational change
 Workload in line with workers‘ capabilities and
resources.
 Design jobs to provide meaning, stimulation, and
opportunities
28PPT-153-01
Dealing with Job Stress
 Organizational change
 Clearly define roles and responsibilities
 Workers participate in decisions affecting their
jobs
 Improved communications to reduce job stress
 Social interaction among workers
 Compatible work schedules
29PPT-153-01
Stress Reduction Programs
There are a variety of stress reduction programs
conducted by professional organizations
Explore them to determine applicability to your
needs
Or devise your own program
30PPT-153-01
Your Program
Step 1 — Identify the Problem
 Hold group discussions with employees
 Design an employee survey
 Measure employee perceptions of job
conditions, stress, health, and satisfaction
 Collect objective data
 Analyze data to identify problem locations and
stressful job conditions
31PPT-153-01
Your Program
Step 2 — Design and Implement Interventions
 Target source of stress for change
 Propose and prioritize intervention strategies
 Communicate planned interventions to
employees
 Implement Interventions
32PPT-153-01
Your Program
Step 3 — Evaluate the Interventions
 Conduct both short- and long-term evaluations
 Measure employee perceptions of job
conditions, stress, health, and satisfaction
 Measure employee perceptions of job
conditions, stress, health, and satisfaction
 Include objective measures
 Refine the intervention strategy and return to
Step 1
33PPT-153-01
Reducing Stress
Start a healthful life style
 Compartmentalize work/home life
 Get physical exercise
 Discuss problems with spouse or friends or
peers at work
 Change to non-work activity
 Change strategy to work tasks
 Develop Positive Coping Skills
34PPT-153-01
Exercise: Knee Hug Stretch*
 Pull one leg to your chest, grasp with both
hands and hold for a count of five.
 Repeat with the opposite leg.
*Remember to always check with your
doctor before beginning attempting any
exercises to ensure you’re physically capable
35PPT-153-01
Exercise: Windmill
 Place your feet apart on the floor.
 Bend over and touch your right
hand to your left foot, with your
left arm up.
 Repeat with opposite arm.
36PPT-153-01
Exercise: Back Relaxer
 Bend down between your knees for as long as
you can.
 Return to upright position, straighten, and
relax.
37PPT-153-01
Exercise: Pectoral Stretch
 Grasp your hands behind
your neck and press your
elbows back as far as you
can.
 Return to starting position,
then drop your arms and
relax.
 Relax.
38PPT-153-01
Middle/Upper Back Stretch
 Raise your right arm and grasp
it below the elbow with your
left hand.
 Gently pull your right elbow
toward your left shoulder as
you feel the stretch.
 Hold for five seconds.
 Repeat for left side.
39PPT-153-01
Exercise: Side Stretch
 While seated, interlace your
fingers and lift your arms over
your head, keeping your elbows
straight.
 Press your arms backward as
far as you can.
 Slowly lean to the left, and then
to the right until you can feel
the stretching.
40PPT-153-01
Exercise: Finger Stretch
 With palms down, spread your fingers apart
as far as you can.
 Hold for the count of five.
 Relax and then repeat.
41PPT-153-01
Exercise: Shoulder Roll
 Slowly roll your shoulders forward five times in
a circular motion using your full range of
motion.
 Then roll your shoulders backward five times
with the same circular motion.
42PPT-153-01
Summary
 Each of us is stressed every day
 Some stressors are good; some bad
 We need to recognize and handle stress
 Rather than retreating from stress, we need to
face it head-on
 Stress may be reduced by attending professional
programs or your agency may create its own
 Various exercises may help reduce stress
 Whichever method is adopted, stress reduction
must be achieved to reduce the wear and tear
on people, productivity and safety
43PPT-153-01
Contact Information
Health & Safety Training Specialists
1171 South Cameron Street, Room 324
Harrisburg, PA 17104-2501
(717) 772-1635
RA-LI-BWC-PATHS@pa.gov
44PPT-153-01
Like us on Facebook! -
https://www.facebook.com/BWCPATHS
Questions
45PPT-153-01
Bibliography
A Memo to "All Regional Flight Surgeons," from
the US Department of Transportation in 1984
International Safety: New Report Highlights
Dangerous Coping Responses for Work Stress
Sandy Smith Thu, 2008-07-17
Monster’s “Workplace Stress” study surveyed
nearly 1,000 job seekers on the Monster database
via an online survey. The survey ran from March
12, 2014 to March 18, 2014.
Deepika.Murty@monster.com
46PPT-153-01
Bibliography
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Journal of Applied Psychology
“Stress at Work,” DHHS (NIOSH) Publication
Number 99-101, 1999
http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/docs/99-
101/default.html
Merriam Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary
47PPT-153-01
Bibliography
http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20140
416005091/en/Dangerously-Stressful-Work-
Environments-Force-Workers-Seek
“Stress and Worker Safety,” Tom Musick, editor,
Safety + Health Magazine, July, 2016
48PPT-153-01
Other Suggested Programs
The following presentations are also available to
supplement your in-house program:
 Difficult Coworkers
 Dealing with Angry People
 Ergonomics
 Job Safety/Hazard Analysis
Please contact us for a full list of other programs
available to you free of charge.
49PPT-153-01
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Stress and Worker Safety by Pennsylvania L&I

  • 1. Stress and Worker Safety 1PPT-153-01 Bureau of Workers’ Compensation PA Training for Health & Safety (PATHS)
  • 2. Stress Defined “A state resulting from a stress, especially: one of bodily or mental tension resulting from factors that tend to alter an existent equilibrium.” Stressed-out: “Suffering from high levels of physical or especially psychological stress.” Merriam Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary. 2PPT-153-01
  • 3. Bad Stressors Internal and external impacts. Things we can not confront or refuse to confront.  Broken Promises  Overburdening workloads  Hectic schedules  Angry verbal exchanges  Abusive Management  Things outside your control 3PPT-153-01
  • 4. Good Stressors Positive reactions:  Ability to react to events  Managing schedules  Situational awareness  Dealing with people: staff and clients Short term stress can be a means for you to react successfully to a situation to promote your safety 4PPT-153-01
  • 5. Daily Stressors Things we are forced to consider daily:  Driving hazards (people and road)  Interactions with coworkers and public  Sudden schedule changes  Lack of or poor communications  Active Shooter possibility  Terrorist attacks 5PPT-153-01
  • 6. Causes of Stress Drs. Holmes and Rahe developed Life Change Units to determine the impact of stressors in a person’s life. Areas considered to impact a person and health risks assigned include the areas of:  Work Events  Personal Issues  Financial State  Social Condition  Family Concerns  Current events 6PPT-153-01
  • 7. Identifying Your Stressors Drs. Holmes and Rahe took the following impacts into account for their study. Over a 24 month period, these impacts were viewed.  Family  Finances  Recreation  Physical reactions  Emotional reactions  Psychological reactions 7PPT-153-01
  • 8. Stress Warning Signs Look for the following developing in yourself and co-workers:  Isolation  Deterioration of personal appearance  Loss of interest  Carelessness  Poor work quality  Increased absenteeism  Lowered productivity 8PPT-153-01
  • 9. Stress Warning Checklist DOT memo to “All Regional Flight Surgeons” 1. Deterioration of personal appearance 2. Self-Imposed Isolation 3. Mood Swings 4. Borrowing Money from Friends/Peers 5. Radical Loss/Gain of Weight 6. Deterioration of Morale (A 1984 memo which is still relevant) 9PPT-153-01
  • 10. Stress Warning Checklist 7. Complaints of Fatigue 8. Lowered Productivity 9. Loss of Interest in Promotions 10. Performance Deficiencies 11. Apathy 12. Poor Concentration 10PPT-153-01
  • 11. Stress Warning Checklist 13. Irritability 14. Taking Needless Risks 15. Vague Complaints of Illness 16. Carelessness 17. Extended Lunch Breaks 18. High Accident Rate 11PPT-153-01
  • 12. Stress Warning Checklist 19. Complaints of Personal and Family Problems 20. Unexplained Disappearances from the Work Place 21. Sporadic Work Pace 22. Inconsistent Work Quality 23. Increased Lateness 24. Increased Absenteeism 25. Loss of Driving License 12PPT-153-01
  • 13. Effects of Stress  Job concentration disrupted  Self-initiative reduced  Trust in others diminished  Resentment  Depression  Health problems: stroke  Burn-out 13PPT-153-01
  • 14. Burn-Out Defined Burn-Out is a mental and physical fatigue resulting from the constancy of dedication and effort to a project. Symptoms of Burn-Out:  Emotional exhaustion  Cutting back involvement with others  Depersonalization  Feeling reduced personal accomplishment 14PPT-153-01
  • 15. United Kingdom Study Most stressful working environments found to be:  Recruitment Consultants 82%  Legal profession 78%  Education 73%  Marketing 71%  Health 70%  Finance 68%  Housewives 64% 73% of UK workforce felt stress was a result of work 15PPT-153-01
  • 16. UK Study Coping Methods Methods found for dealing with stress:  Get angry 47%  Eat more 43%  Cry 38%  Drink more 34%  Smoke more 23% 16PPT-153-01
  • 17. Dangerous Coping Methods Stroke in Business Report, 2008, UK People turned to alcohol, smoking and comfort eating, each which can lead to high blood pressure and possibly a stroke. Most likely to drink more (59%) and eat more (59%) although the group most likely to exercise (18%) to reduce stress. (Stroke is the third highest killer in the UK) 17PPT-153-01
  • 18. US Stress Study “Has stress from work ever driven you to a job change?” 6,700 U.S. responses found:  42% of respondents answered “I have purposely changed jobs due to a stressful work environment”  35% of respondents answered “I thought about changing my job because of a stressful work environment”  23% of respondents answered “I have never changed my job specifically due to a stressful work environment” 18PPT-153-01
  • 19. US Stress Study From 900 responses: The most commonly reported workplace stressors  Supervisor relationship (40%)  Amount of work (39%)  Work-life balance (34%)  Coworker relationships (31%) 19PPT-153-01
  • 20. US Stress Study From 900 responses: 61% of respondents believe that workplace stress has been the cause of an illness 46% of respondents have missed time at work due to work-related stress 7% report illness so severe it caused hospitalization 20PPT-153-01
  • 21. US Stress Study 84% of respondents claim that their stressful job has impacted their personal lives 26% report sleepless nights 24% report depression 21% report family or relationship issues 19% report physical ailments 21PPT-153-01
  • 22. U.S. Coping Methods The most common methods of coping with work- related stress include:  Talking to a friend/colleague/spouse (55%)  Exercising (40%)  Eating (35%)  Stepping away from work (35%)  Taking a day off (32%)  Drinking after work (24%) 22PPT-153-01
  • 23. US Coping Methods When asked “What does your office do to help alleviate stress in the workplace?”  13% “extra time-off”  11% “ability to work from home”  66% answered “nothing.” 23PPT-153-01
  • 24. Job Stress Defined Job stress  Harmful physical and emotional responses that occur when the requirements of the job do not match the capabilities, resources, or needs of the worker. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, workers who must take time off work because of stress, anxiety, or a related disorder will be off the job for about 20 days. 24PPT-153-01
  • 25. Job Stress Worker Characteristics versus Working Conditions Reducing the effects of stressful working conditions include the following:  Balance between work and family or personal life  A support network of friends and coworkers  A relaxed and positive outlook 25PPT-153-01
  • 26. Results of Job Stress  Cardiovascular Disease  MSD disorders  Psychological disorders  Workplace injury  Suicide, Cancer, ulcers, impaired immune function 26PPT-153-01
  • 27. Job Stress Reduction  Design of work tasks  Management styles  Interpersonal relationships  Workloads  Career concerns  Environmental conditions 27PPT-153-01
  • 28. Dealing with Job Stress  Stress Management Programs  Organizational change  Workload in line with workers‘ capabilities and resources.  Design jobs to provide meaning, stimulation, and opportunities 28PPT-153-01
  • 29. Dealing with Job Stress  Organizational change  Clearly define roles and responsibilities  Workers participate in decisions affecting their jobs  Improved communications to reduce job stress  Social interaction among workers  Compatible work schedules 29PPT-153-01
  • 30. Stress Reduction Programs There are a variety of stress reduction programs conducted by professional organizations Explore them to determine applicability to your needs Or devise your own program 30PPT-153-01
  • 31. Your Program Step 1 — Identify the Problem  Hold group discussions with employees  Design an employee survey  Measure employee perceptions of job conditions, stress, health, and satisfaction  Collect objective data  Analyze data to identify problem locations and stressful job conditions 31PPT-153-01
  • 32. Your Program Step 2 — Design and Implement Interventions  Target source of stress for change  Propose and prioritize intervention strategies  Communicate planned interventions to employees  Implement Interventions 32PPT-153-01
  • 33. Your Program Step 3 — Evaluate the Interventions  Conduct both short- and long-term evaluations  Measure employee perceptions of job conditions, stress, health, and satisfaction  Measure employee perceptions of job conditions, stress, health, and satisfaction  Include objective measures  Refine the intervention strategy and return to Step 1 33PPT-153-01
  • 34. Reducing Stress Start a healthful life style  Compartmentalize work/home life  Get physical exercise  Discuss problems with spouse or friends or peers at work  Change to non-work activity  Change strategy to work tasks  Develop Positive Coping Skills 34PPT-153-01
  • 35. Exercise: Knee Hug Stretch*  Pull one leg to your chest, grasp with both hands and hold for a count of five.  Repeat with the opposite leg. *Remember to always check with your doctor before beginning attempting any exercises to ensure you’re physically capable 35PPT-153-01
  • 36. Exercise: Windmill  Place your feet apart on the floor.  Bend over and touch your right hand to your left foot, with your left arm up.  Repeat with opposite arm. 36PPT-153-01
  • 37. Exercise: Back Relaxer  Bend down between your knees for as long as you can.  Return to upright position, straighten, and relax. 37PPT-153-01
  • 38. Exercise: Pectoral Stretch  Grasp your hands behind your neck and press your elbows back as far as you can.  Return to starting position, then drop your arms and relax.  Relax. 38PPT-153-01
  • 39. Middle/Upper Back Stretch  Raise your right arm and grasp it below the elbow with your left hand.  Gently pull your right elbow toward your left shoulder as you feel the stretch.  Hold for five seconds.  Repeat for left side. 39PPT-153-01
  • 40. Exercise: Side Stretch  While seated, interlace your fingers and lift your arms over your head, keeping your elbows straight.  Press your arms backward as far as you can.  Slowly lean to the left, and then to the right until you can feel the stretching. 40PPT-153-01
  • 41. Exercise: Finger Stretch  With palms down, spread your fingers apart as far as you can.  Hold for the count of five.  Relax and then repeat. 41PPT-153-01
  • 42. Exercise: Shoulder Roll  Slowly roll your shoulders forward five times in a circular motion using your full range of motion.  Then roll your shoulders backward five times with the same circular motion. 42PPT-153-01
  • 43. Summary  Each of us is stressed every day  Some stressors are good; some bad  We need to recognize and handle stress  Rather than retreating from stress, we need to face it head-on  Stress may be reduced by attending professional programs or your agency may create its own  Various exercises may help reduce stress  Whichever method is adopted, stress reduction must be achieved to reduce the wear and tear on people, productivity and safety 43PPT-153-01
  • 44. Contact Information Health & Safety Training Specialists 1171 South Cameron Street, Room 324 Harrisburg, PA 17104-2501 (717) 772-1635 RA-LI-BWC-PATHS@pa.gov 44PPT-153-01 Like us on Facebook! - https://www.facebook.com/BWCPATHS
  • 46. Bibliography A Memo to "All Regional Flight Surgeons," from the US Department of Transportation in 1984 International Safety: New Report Highlights Dangerous Coping Responses for Work Stress Sandy Smith Thu, 2008-07-17 Monster’s “Workplace Stress” study surveyed nearly 1,000 job seekers on the Monster database via an online survey. The survey ran from March 12, 2014 to March 18, 2014. Deepika.Murty@monster.com 46PPT-153-01
  • 47. Bibliography Bureau of Labor Statistics Journal of Applied Psychology “Stress at Work,” DHHS (NIOSH) Publication Number 99-101, 1999 http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/docs/99- 101/default.html Merriam Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary 47PPT-153-01
  • 49. Other Suggested Programs The following presentations are also available to supplement your in-house program:  Difficult Coworkers  Dealing with Angry People  Ergonomics  Job Safety/Hazard Analysis Please contact us for a full list of other programs available to you free of charge. 49PPT-153-01

Hinweis der Redaktion

  1. Although we don’t like to admit it, stress is a part of our everyday life. You can face it, avoid it or transfer it. Most of us have to face it. Pictures: tweakyourbiz.com and trendsupdates.com
  2. By the very nature of its definition, “stress” impacts on us physically and mentally. Picture: galleryhip.com
  3. The impacts causing stress may be small or large; short- or long-duration; actual or imagined. They are usually a result of the work demands placed on us and our considerations of the consequences if we don’t succeed (failure may result in job loss). Picture: experiencelife.com
  4. Some stressors may be viewed as positives. They allow us to react to protect our safety, i.e. jumping from in front of a speeding car; leaving an area where we detect aggressive behavior. Picture: chiro2u.com.au
  5. Some stressors we’ve learned to anticipate and have developed coping mechanisms. Examples might be driving in a safe and courteous manner; being low-key with coworkers and bosses. Other intrusive events may be anticipated but may not be seriously thought to be a potential stressor, i.e. active shooters or a terroristic attack on you or your building. Still, we must practice situational awareness and consider actions we would take if necessary. Pictures: rjwestmore.com.jpg And isrj.org
  6. Life Change Units were developed in 1967 by psychiatrists Thomas Holmes and Richard Rahe. They surveyed more than 5,000 medical patients and asked them to say whether they had experience any of a series of 43 life events in the previous two years. * Each event, called a Life Change Unit (LCU), had a different "weight" for stress. The more events the patient added up, the higher the score. The higher the score, and the larger the weight of each event, the more likely the patient was to become ill. * * Taken from an article in “MindTools.” Picture: instacalmhypnosis.com
  7. Each of the above may be a stressor to varying degrees. Picture: trendsupdates.com
  8. Pay attention to these warning signs not only in yourself but in coworkers. They may presage future events. Picture: huffingtonpost.com
  9. A memo to "All Regional Flight Surgeons," from the US Department of Transportation in 1984, provided a checklist of warning signs of employee distress. This list was a modified version of one used by the supervisors of Bell Laboratories in New Jersey and is still relevant today. Picture: blog.airgeorgian.ca
  10. The topics of these 4 slides can be used to create a personal checklist.
  11. Picture: ianbrownlee.wordpress.com
  12. Any or all of the twenty-five listed items could be a warning sign of an individual suffering from stress.
  13. Job disruption. Older studies indicated that you would need 30 minutes to regain your train of thought on a project if you were disrupted. This, of course, depended on the amount of concentration from which you were disrupted. Too much stress may also lead to health issues. Each of the above may lead to additional stressors. Your situation is thereby compounded. Stress can ultimately lead to Burn-Out. Picture: telegraph.co.uk
  14. Burn-out is due to compounding issues leading to exhaustion. The resulting fatigue may be due to overwork, unrealistic project schedules, and conflicts between job and personal agendas.
  15. Stress is not only inherent to the United States as evidenced by this report in International Safety: New Report Highlights Dangerous Coping Responses for Work Stress, Sandy Smith, Thu, 2008-07-17.
  16. International Safety: New Report Highlights Dangerous Coping Responses for Work Stress, Sandy Smith, Thu, 2008-07-17. Picture: stressaffect.com
  17. International Safety: New Report Highlights Dangerous Coping Responses for Work Stress, Sandy Smith, Thu, 2008-07-17
  18. Monster is the worldwide leader in successfully connecting people to job opportunities. Monster’s “Workplace Stress” study surveyed nearly 1,000 job seekers on the Monster database via an online survey. The survey ran from March 12, 2014 to March 18, 2014.
  19. Monster’s “Workplace Stress” study surveyed nearly 1,000 job seekers on the Monster database via an online survey. The survey ran from March 12, 2014 to March 18, 2014. Above is result of 900 of the surveyed.
  20. Here is additional information from 900 responses.
  21. The results listed are from the Monster study conducted. Picture: trendsupdates.com
  22. The Monster study found that people in the U.S. use different methods to cope with stress. Are your coping methods different than those listed? How do you cope? Picture: thedigeratilife.com
  23. Could job stress be handled differently toward a positive outcome by your and other agencies? Pictures: pinterest.com and suggestkeyword.com
  24. Note: According to data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, workers who must take time off work because of stress, anxiety, or a related disorder will be off the job for about 20 days. -Bureau of Labor Statistics
  25. Stress at Work, DHHS (NIOSH) Publication Number 99-101, 1999 http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/docs/99-101/default.html Working conditions had a major impact on stress in this study.
  26. Some of these ailments and diseases are the result of long-term impact; cardiovascular disease and psychological disorders. Some are the result of short-term (by comparison) impacts; MSD disorders and workplace injury. Picture: centerforanxiety.org
  27. In one study, the frequency of medication errors declined by 50% after prevention activities were implemented in a 700-bed hospital. In a second study, there was a 70% reduction in malpractice claims in 22 hospitals that implemented stress prevention activities. In contrast, there was no reduction in claims in a matched group of 22 hospitals that did not implement stress prevention activities. -Journal of Applied Psychology Picture: superworkingmum.com
  28. 1999 DHHS (NIOSH) Publication Number 99-101 Picture: executivecoachingpsychologist.com
  29. 1999 DHHS (NIOSH) Publication Number 99-101 Picture: sigma-re.com
  30. There are many stress reduction programs available through professional organizations and these can be tailored to a specific company’s needs. Picture: businessnewsdaily.com
  31. The best method to explore the scope and source of a suspected stress problem in an organization depends partly on the size of the organization and the available resources. Group discussions among managers, labor representatives, and employees can provide rich sources of information. Such discussions may be all that is needed to track down and remedy stress problems in a small company. In a larger organization, such discussions can be used to help design formal surveys for gathering input about stressful job conditions from large numbers of employees. Regardless of the method used to collect data, information should be obtained about employee perceptions of their job conditions and perceived levels of stress. “Stress at Work,” DHHS (NIOSH) Publication Number 99-101, 1999
  32. Once the sources of stress at work have been identified and the scope of the problem is understood, the stage is set for design and implementation of an intervention strategy. In small organizations, the informal discussions that helped identify stress problems may also produce fruitful ideas for prevention. In large organizations, a more formal process may be needed. Frequently, a team is asked to develop recommendations based on analysis of data from Step 1 and consultation with outside experts. “Stress at Work,” DHHS (NIOSH) Publication Number 99-101, 1999
  33. Evaluation is an essential step in the intervention process. Evaluation is necessary to determine whether the intervention is producing desired effects and whether changes in direction are needed. Time frames for evaluating interventions should be established. “Stress at Work,” DHHS (NIOSH) Publication Number 99-101, 1999
  34. Several means for Reducing Stress which have worked for others include: Starting a healthful life style Compartmentalizing work/home life Getting physical exercise Discussing problems with spouse or friends or peers at work Changing to non-work activity Changing the strategy to work tasks Develop positive coping skills
  35. Exercises at the workplace can help relieve strain and pain due to being stressed. The Knee Hug Stretch is one such exercise you can do at your desk. - While seated, pull one leg to your chest, grasp with both hands and hold for a count of five. - Repeat with the opposite leg. Picture: blog.studeo55.ca
  36. Exercise- Windmill While seated, place your feet apart on the floor. Bend over and touch your right hand to your left foot, with your left arm up. Repeat with opposite arm. Picture: styleontheside.com
  37. Exercise - Back Relaxer - While seated, bend down between your knees for as long as you can. - Return to upright position, straighten, and relax. Picture: pinterest.com
  38. Exercise – Pectoral Stretch - While seated, grasp your hands behind your neck and press your elbows back as far as you can. - Return to starting position, then drop your arms and relax. - Relax. Picture: mypurush.wordpress.com
  39. Exercise – Middle/Upper Back Stretch - While seated, raise your right arm and grasp it below the elbow with your left hand. - Gently pull your right elbow toward your left shoulder as you feel the stretch. - Hold for five seconds. - Repeat for left side. Picture: ehow.co.uk
  40. Exercise – Side Stretch While seated, interlace your fingers and lift your arms over your head, keeping your elbows straight. Press your arms backward as far as you can. Slowly lean to the left, and then to the right until you can feel the stretching. Picture: goodeveningworld.com
  41. Exercise – Finger Stretch - While seated, with palms down, spread your fingers apart as far as you can. - Hold for the count of five. - Relax and then repeat. Picture: webmd.com
  42. Exercise – Shoulder Roll - While seated, slowly roll your shoulders forward five times in a circular motion using your full range of motion. - Then roll your shoulders backward five times with the same circular motion. Picture: physicaltherapydatabase.blogspot
  43. Stress can be good or bad and most times depending on how it is deal with it makes it good or bad for a person.