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Similar a eCampus Alberta Operational Retreat Open Education workshop(20)

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eCampus Alberta Operational Retreat Open Education workshop

  1. Unless otherwise noted, this work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution License. Feel free to use, modify or distribute any or all of this presentation with attribution to Clint Lalonde, BCcampus. eCampus Alberta Operational Retreat bit.ly/ecaretreat
  2. “…openness is the sole means by which education is effected. If a teacher is not sharing what he or she knows, there is no education happening. In fact, those educators who share the most thoroughly of themselves with the greatest proportion of their students are the ones we deem successful. In other words, is the teacher a successful sharer? If so, then the teacher is a successful educator. If attempts at sharing fail, then the teacher is a poor educator. Education is sharing. Education is about being open.” Openness as Catalyst for an Educational Reformation, David Wiley, EDUCAUSE Review, vol. 45, no. 4 (July/August 2010): 14–20
  3. What is Open Education? • Open Access: Publishing research in open journals. • Open Data: Releasing datasets for reuse by others. • Open Source Software: Using, sharing and collaboratively creating software. • Open Admissions: Flexible admission policies to institutions or courses. • Open Scholarship: Sharing of teaching and research practices. • Open Educational Resources (OER): Sharing and reuse of teaching and learning materials including courses (open courseware) and textbooks (open textbooks). • Open Pedagogy: What teaching and learning practices does “open” enable?
  4. Open Access “As a society, we are paying for science, and then we’re paying to read about it.”
  5. Open Data https://uwaterloo.ca/stories/open-data-waterloo-fosters-student-innovation
  6. Open Source Software
  7. Open Admissions
  8. Day of the MOOC by Michael Branson Smith used under Creative Commons license
  9. Open Scholarship
  10. Open Educational Resources “Open Educational Resources (OERs) are any type of educational materials that are in the public domain or introduced with an open license. The nature of these open materials means that anyone can legally and freely copy, use, adapt and re-share them.” Source: UNESCO http://www.unesco.org/new/en/communication-and-information/access-to-knowledge/open-educational- resources/what-are-open-educational-resources-oers/
  11. Digital Enables
  12. Cost to copy a 250 page book Copy by hand $1000 Copy by print on demand (color) $24.50 Copy by print on demand (B&W) $7.60 Copy by computer $0.00084 Cost to distribute a 250 page book Distribute by mail $5.20 Distribute via internet $0.00072
  13. Copyright Restricts
  14. All Rights Reserved
  15. Some Rights Reserved Creative Commons logo by Creative Commons used under under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License
  16. Open Pedagogy 5.5 million view per month. The most visited chemistry website in the world. Delmar Larsen now offers extra credit to students who submit entries. He assigns a rating system to new articles based on the author's expertise and experience, with articles moving up as they are edited and vetted. Sources: ChemWiki takes on costly textbooks UC Davis News, October 2013 UCD Hyperlink Newsletter October 2014
  17. Activity: Barriers On a sticky note, write down a barrier or fear that you may have, or may have heard expressed to you, about open education.
  18. Activity: Build an OER Break into small groups (3-4), and, using the resources you will see, collaboratively create a new piece of instructional content built with openly licensed resources that you find and copy from the internet. You may want to work with people who have a similar discipline background as you. Some ideas: • If you have discipline specific knowledge or are classroom faculty, design a short lesson on a topic that you teach using OER’s. • Search for OER’s on using OER’s and, using thse, build a primer for faculty on how to use OER’s. • Create a handout for faculty on how to write learning objectives using OER. • Remix this workshop! Build a short presentation on OER’s with the materials I have openly licensed today. Search and find images, text and multimedia content from the resources you have seen today. Be sure to attribute the resources you use correctly within the document, and decide on a license to released your newly created object with that is compatible with all the licenses in your document.
  19. 5R’s & Creative Commons “Open Educational Resources (OERs) are any type of educational materials that are in the public domain or introduced with an open license. The nature of these open materials means that anyone can legally and freely copy, use, adapt and re-share them.”
  20. 5R’s • Make and own copiesRetain • Use in a wide range of waysReuse • Adapt, modify, and improveRevise • Combine two or moreRemix • Share with othersRedistribute Adapted (color change) from Open Education: A “Simple” Introduction by David Wiley released under CC-BY license
  21. Reusability Paradox The more context a learning object has, the more (and the more easily) a learner can learn from it. To make learning objects maximally reusable, learning objects should contain as little context as possible. The Reusability Paradox image by David Wiley used under a Creative Commons Attribution License (CC-BY 3.0) Retrieved from http://cnx.org/content/m11898/latest/
  22. “Therefore, pedagogical effectiveness and potential for reuse are completely at odds with one another, unless the end user is permitted to edit the learning object.” Source: The Reusability Paradox, David Wiley, Connexions. http://cnx.org/content/m11898/latest/
  23. Only for items you want to copy (Linking and embedding ok)
  24. Credit: Adopting Open Textbooks Workshop by Paul Stacey licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License (CC-BY License Features
  25. Credit: Adopting Open Textbooks Workshop by Paul Stacey licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License (CC-BY
  26. Credit: This is a modified version of a slide from Adopting Open Textbooks Workshop by Paul Stacey licensed under CC-BY. Text has been removed and the CC0 logo has been added Spectrum of Openness
  27. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/ Credit: Adopting Open Textbooks Workshop by Paul Stacey licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License (CC-BY
  28. How Machine Readable Code works IRL* Google search with Open Attribute browser plugin * In Real Life
  29. How do I mark stuff I want to license?
  30. Unless otherwise noted, this work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution License.
  31. Unless otherwise noted, this work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution License. Feel free to use, modify or distribute any or all of this presentation with attribution to Clint Lalonde, BCcampus.
  32. creativecommons.org/choose/
  33. How do I properly attribute CC stuff I use?
  34. Attribution - TASL T – Title A – Artist S – Source (usually link) L – CC license If you modify, note what you changed wiki.creativecommons.org/wiki/Best_practices_for_attribution
  35. Shark! by guitarfish CC-BY
  36. Modified image Shark! by guitarfish CC-BY Text and arrow added. Never will be me
  37. Modified image Shark! by guitarfish CC-BY Text and arrow added. Never will be me
  38. Modified image Shark! by guitarfish CC-BY Text and arrow added. Shark text from Wikipedia used under a CC-BY- SA Never will be me Sharks are a group of fish characterized by a cartilaginous skeleton, five to seven gill slits on the sides of the head, and pectoral fins that are not fused to the head.
  39. This is a modified image based on the image Shark! by guitarfish CC-BY Text and arrow was added. Shark text from Wikipedia used under a CC-BY- SA license This image is released under a CC-BY-SA license Never will be me Sharks are a group of fish characterized by a cartilaginous skeleton, five to seven gill slits on the sides of the head, and pectoral fins that are not fused to the head.
  40. https://wiki.creativecommons.org/wiki/Frequently_Asked_Questions#If_I_derive_or_adapt_mat erial_offered_under_a_Creative_Commons_license.2C_which_CC_license.28s.29_can_I_use. 3F Adaptations
  41. Activity: Write the attribution Step1: Create a new Word document. Search Flickr for a Creative Commons licensed image. Download a copy of the image and paste it into a Word document. Write the attribution for the photo using the TASL guidelines in the document. Step 2: License the new document with a CC license that is compatible with the image you have chosen. Use the resources at the Creative Commons site. • License picker • Best Practices for Attribution • Compatibility chart
  42. Finding OER Open Textbooks (remember you don’t have to use entire textbook. Copy, cut/paste and use just parts, bits and pieces if you want) open.bccampus.ca The BC Campus collection OpenStax College major project out of Rice University General Searches Use the Creative Commons search engine Search Google using Advanced Search (scroll down to usage rights. How do these line up with the CC licenses?) Always follow back to original source to confirm license on the original site. Public General repositories Wikimedia Commons: content created by community to support Wikipedia articles Flickr: user generated photos & The Commons, open photos from cultural institutions Slideshare: Presentations and slides Edu specific OER Commons MERLOT (be sure to drill down into communities for specific academic resources, like the Teacher Education portal) MIT Open Courseware SOLR - BC created open resources
  43. Activity: Build an OER Break into small groups (3-4), and, using the resources you have seen, collaboratively create a new piece of instructional content built with openly licensed resources that you find and copy from the internet. You may want to work with people who have a similar discipline background as you. Some ideas: • If you have discipline specific knowledge or are classroom faculty, design a short lesson on a topic that you teach using OER’s. • Search for OER’s on using OER’s and, using thse, build a primer for faculty on how to use OER’s. • Create a handout for faculty on how to write learning objectives using OER. • Remix this workshop! Build a short presentation on OER’s with the materials I have openly licensed today. Search and find images, text and multimedia content from the resources you have seen today. Be sure to attribute the resources you use correctly within the document, and decide on a license to released your newly created object with that is compatible with all the licenses in your document.
  44. Open Pedagogy? At it’s core, the question of open pedagogy is “what can I do in the context of open that I couldn’t do before?” David Wiley, Evolving Open Pedagogy
  45. Open Pedagogy? • Working on the open web with openly licensed materials • Real. Authentic. It Matters. • Make connections to larger community possible. • Disposable vs. authentic assignments.
  46. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:WikiProject_Murder_Madness_and_Mayhem
  47. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mario_Vargas_Llosa
  48. “Jonathan Worth's classes live on blogs and on Twitter (hashtag #phonar), and are proving a popular resource amongst photography enthusiasts and professionals alike.” “Worth can see comments from students both in the room and online via Twitter or Facebook in real time, as well as allowing others to drop in, or suggest links to relevant material. It's a fluid learning experience” http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/in-pictures-20495489
  49. “Through my work with #phonar I have learnt the world is filled with lots of different people and we all think and learn differently. “ “The skills I have learned and developed from the open classes have given me the confidence in my work to distribute it and enter it into national and international competitions. “ http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/in-pictures-20495489
  50. Network Mentors
  51. Open Pedagogy Challenge What can you do that you could not do before in the context of open?

Hinweis der Redaktion

  1. Influenced by Open Source Software
  2. step 2 is to simply receive the license there are 6 CC licenses that reflect a spectrum of rights for the photos I share on Flickr, I use the Attribution only license, which means that anyone can download, copy, distribute, remix, tweak, and build upon them, even commercially, as long as they give me credit
  3. of course the 3 layer approach of CC licenses and CC0 Public Domain Dedication helps communicate rights humans can understand a simple deed with primary rights and responsibilities described with those pervasive icons you see lawyers we have a legally enforceable legal code machine readable metadata that can be understood by search engines so you can filter for content based on the CC licenses there are six CC licenses that offer a spectrum of rights the most recognized and widely used license for Open Access is CC BY allows for unconditional reuse of the licensed material except for requirement that author is credited public domain tools - CC0 public domain dedication is a waiver of copyright and related rights thus placing the content into the public domain
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