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Learn, Unlearn and Relearn

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A presentation that describes the importance of learn, unlearn and relearn.

Veröffentlicht in: Kleinunternehmen & Unternehmertum
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Learn, Unlearn and Relearn

  1. 1. © www.qualitymadesimple.com Learn Unlearn Relearn Perception, Errors and Agreement: an Insight into how humans think 1
  2. 2. © www.qualitymadesimple.com Alvin Toffler The illiterate of the 21st century will not be those who cannot read and write, but those who cannot learn, unlearn, and relearn 2
  3. 3. © www.qualitymadesimple.com Agenda • Life Skills • Some Facts • Perception & Errors • Learn • Unlearn • Relearn • Change • Summary • Agreement • How to use this? • References – Reading List 3
  4. 4. © www.qualitymadesimple.com Life Skills 4
  5. 5. © www.qualitymadesimple.com Some Facts Roger's categories are: • Innovators (2.5 %) • Early Adopters (13.5 %) • Early Majority (34 %) • Late Majority (34 %) • Laggards (16 %) Successful innovation goes through a period of slow adoption before experiencing a sudden period of rapid adoption and then a gradual leveling off (forms an S-shaped curve). 5
  6. 6. © www.qualitymadesimple.com Learning Process - 1 6
  7. 7. © www.qualitymadesimple.com Learning Process - 2 7
  8. 8. © www.qualitymadesimple.com Perception & Errors - 1 We dance round in a ring and suppose, but the secret sits in the middle and knows. Read more:http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/authors/r/robert_frost_5.html#i xzz18iJbrBaW 8
  9. 9. © www.qualitymadesimple.com Perception & Errors - 2 9
  10. 10. © www.qualitymadesimple.com Perception & Errors - 3 Idea 1 An odd number cannot be divided by two Idea 2 I can divide $7 into two, giving $3.50 each Tension 1 2 3 1. Concept 2. Conflict 3. Construct Clarity Confusion 10
  11. 11. © www.qualitymadesimple.com Learn • It means acquisition of new knowledge or skills • Then you implement the learned values into your behaviour • Then you pass on what you have learned to other people 11
  12. 12. © www.qualitymadesimple.com Unlearn - 1 • It means forgetting • The process to forget some existing knowledge. • It can be planned or unplanned • Unlearn may not be totally voluntary; and its outcome may be positive or negative. But it is essential part of learning • Why? – “Insanity is doing the same old thing over and over again and expecting a different result” (Albert Einstein) – "If at first you don't succeed, try, try again. Then give up. There's no sense being a damn fool about it." (Mark Twain) 12
  13. 13. © www.qualitymadesimple.com Unlearn - 2 • 90 % of Knowledge is Automated & Unconscious – Includes acting and thinking (“Blink”) – Automates only when accurate in context – Context changes but knowledge does not – The more it is used, the stronger it becomes and the more difficult it is to change – Intention not enough (Perception Errors) – We know very little about how to replace automated knowledge with new knowledge 13
  14. 14. © www.qualitymadesimple.com Unlearn - 3 So, how do we help people unlearn – so that they can learn? • Start by thinking about how someone would do something without being trained – If they succeed, they don’t need training – If not, what they tried to do is what needs to be unlearned – Intention is not enough – How many people thought of perceptions? - Ironic processes dominate. • Helping someone unlearn begins with understanding the stages of change – Each stage requires different kinds of support 14
  15. 15. © www.qualitymadesimple.com Relearn Relearn is…Fostering the culture, that people ingrained consciously to acquire new skills and knowledge 15
  16. 16. © www.qualitymadesimple.com Change - 1 • James O Prochaska – Transtheoretical Model (It is based on an analysis of different theories of psychotherapy) • 6 Stages of Change – Pre-contemplation: No need to change – Contemplation: Maybe I need to change? – Preparation: Ok, I’m going to change – Action: I’m in the process of changing – Maintenance: I’m holding on to change – Relapse: I’ve fallen off the wagon 16
  17. 17. © www.qualitymadesimple.com Change - 2 • Pre-contemplation: No need to change – Individual or team denies need to learn anything new or to change • Must experience conflict about beliefs – Test their way to accomplish goal and show that it does not work (handles overconfidence) – Show them similar change by respected others 17
  18. 18. © www.qualitymadesimple.com Change - 3 • Contemplation: Maybe I need to change? – Sitting on the fence – ambivalent • Evaluate team and individual benefits of change plus risks of not changing • Handle emotional issues with positivity – Active listening, enjoyable settings • Handle under confidence – Focus on strategy that needs changing & not the person who must change – Promise help and structure 18
  19. 19. © www.qualitymadesimple.com Change - 4 • Preparation: Ok, I’m going to change – Testing the water – planning to act soon • Solve obstacle problems • Establish necessary prior knowledge • Small steps and practice, practice, practice • Give them day by day or hour by hour goals and expectations 19
  20. 20. © www.qualitymadesimple.com Change - 5 • Action: I’m in the process of changing People are in training and/or practicing new learning to “overlearn” • Teach concrete procedure that specifies exactly how to act and decide • Practice, practice, practice • Ask them to pause and choose new learning • Provide job aid’s, coaches and Q&A • Insist on persistence – 20
  21. 21. © www.qualitymadesimple.com Change - 5 • Maintenance: I’m holding on to change Transferring new learning to field – trying to avoid defaulting to old patterns • Prepare commanders to understand and demand new behavior • Provide job aids and coaching • Prepare them for relapse – explain it and how to overcome it • Mindfulness meditation (see references) 21
  22. 22. © www.qualitymadesimple.com Change - 6 • Relapse: I’ve fallen off the wagon Old behaviors have dominated • Treat as normal –Remember perceptions? Expect it. Have a plan. • Evaluate and neutralize the trigger for relapse (stress, fear, emotionality) • Reassess barriers and motivation (value, self confidence, mindfulness) and fix 22
  23. 23. © www.qualitymadesimple.com Change - 7 • Pre-contemplation: No need to change • Contemplation: Maybe I need to change? • Preparation: Ok, I’m going to change • Action: I’m in the process of changing • Maintenance: I’m holding on to change • Relapse: I’ve fallen off the wagon 23
  24. 24. © www.qualitymadesimple.com Summary • We must Unlearn to Learn • Automated thinking and acting difficult to learn and to change • Stress and fear causes old knowledge to reassert itself • Help people first by deciding which of the six stages best represents their position • Treat them depending on their stage 24
  25. 25. © www.qualitymadesimple.com Agreement Alignment is the process of synthesizing varied opinions and viewpoints on a subject. A flock of geese does both -- can a modern organization work in the same way without stifling creativity? Getting alignment on "why we're doing this is not about getting everyone to see "the right answer" so much as incorporating everyone's viewpoint into a "shared vision" of what that means. Cultural alignment can mean "same thing" as in, "we are all driving toward the same goals" (true north) or it can mean "same way" as in, "we do things consistently." 25
  26. 26. © www.qualitymadesimple.com How to use this? • Keep your mind empty to new things. Remember – a full cup cannot be filled with fresh tea (old Chinese saying) • Accept any possibility • Keep your mind open to perceptions • Understand that there is nothing good or bad, it is only the truth that matters • Understand how humans work Remember : Learning + Unlearning + Relearning = Change = Experience 26
  27. 27. © www.qualitymadesimple.com References – Reading List Gladwell, M. (2005) Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking. NY: Little, Brown and Co. Prochaska, J.O., Norcross, J.C., & DiClemente, C.C. (1994). Changing for Good. NY: William Morrow. Segal, Z.V., Williams, J.M.G., & Teasdale, J.D. (2002) Mindfulness-based Cognitive Therapy for Depression: a new approach to preventing relapse. NY: Guilford Publications Check the BIG PICTURE: http://matt.might.net/articles/phd-school-in-pictures/ 27
  28. 28. © www.qualitymadesimple.com Welcome! 28

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