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Synergy 2015 Session Slides: SYN106 2020 Technology Landscape From The Citrix Technology Office

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© 2015 Citrix1
•  Hello and welcome, my name is Martin Duursma, Vice President of the Citrix
Technology Office.
•  The Citrix Technology ...
•  Citrix at it’s core, is a technology company and where we find ourselves today
is in a world where techolgy is changing...
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Synergy 2015 Session Slides: SYN106 2020 Technology Landscape From The Citrix Technology Office

  1. 1. © 2015 Citrix1
  2. 2. •  Hello and welcome, my name is Martin Duursma, Vice President of the Citrix Technology Office. •  The Citrix Technology Office is a forward leaning group inside of Citrix. It comprises of various teams, including our Citrix Labs organization, CTO Council, the Citrix Startup Accelerator, Strategy and Open Source Business Office. •  These teams are all focused around technology research, innovation and thought leadership. •  Today, I what I would like to share with you is some of our thought leadership insights around what the future will hold. <CLICK> 2 © 2015 Citrix
  3. 3. •  Citrix at it’s core, is a technology company and where we find ourselves today is in a world where techolgy is changing at an ever increasing rate. •  To cope with this change, each year we produce a document for our customers and Citrix employees that is a compass pointing to where the major shifts and changes will be occurring over a 5 year horizon. •  <CLICK> 3 © 2015 Citrix
  4. 4. © 2015 Citrix •  This document we call the Citrix Technology Landscape and because it is looking at a 5 year future window this year’s version is called the 2020 Technology Landscape. I am pleased to announce that we are launching the 2020 Tech Landscape at THIS SESSION. •  So what are we covering this year ? •  Continuing on from our previous years we provide an update on those emerging technology megatrends that are influencing society and workplaces. With this we take a look at a number of different industries and see how they are being transformed by these megatrends. This year we take a look at areas such as the Future of Work and specific verticals such as Healthcare, Education and Finance. We are also excited to introduce two special features looking at the Internet of Things and Innovation – both hot topics that you will all want to hear more about. •  Following this session, you will be able to download the full document at cto.citrix.com 4
  5. 5. •  Today, we are going to take a look at just a small part of the Tech Landscape document. I am going to kick us off with a recap of the trends. I’m then introducing two of our contributing authors, and CTO Council members, Guy Bieber and Matt Hyne to come up and give you an insight into the Future of Work and Healthcare respectively. •  <CLICK> 5 © 2015 Citrix
  6. 6. •  Let me start by highlighting some of the major trends we see over the next 5 years… <click> 6 © 2015 Citrix
  7. 7. © 2015 Citrix •  This is our yearly summary chart of where technology is headed. At the top of the chart we predict some of the major themes we see emerging over the coming years. For example we see that 2015 is when the Internet of Things is hitting mainstream consciousness and 2017 is when driverless car technology will start to impact on our economy. •  Now how we come up with these predictions is looking at a lot of source material from analysts and other sources, but also as you can see at the bottom the chart we are tracking VC investments as usually 2 years after where VC’s are investing we see products emerge. Another predictor is prize based research, for example mid this year we should see the completion of the DARPA robotics challenge (this is to develop a humanoid robot that can navigate a dangerous disaster zone and carry our rescue and remediation work), four years from now expect the results of that competition to show up in commercial products. •  We also look to where exponential growth in capabilities is occurring, such as in BioTech, Compute and Network traffic, and finally note intersections that are driving advances such as Google buying up a number of robotics companies and combining big data with robotics. Biotech taking advantage of new compute capacity and the list goes on. •  While there is a lot of data on this chart, I am going to only highlight three trends that I think are important for all of us to consider… 7
  8. 8. © 2015 Citrix …the new utilities, <CLICK> intimate computing, <CLICK> and new GDP drivers. <CLICK> So lets talk a look at these in a little more detail… <CLICK> 8
  9. 9. © 2015 Citrix …the new utilities, <CLICK> intimate computing, <CLICK> and new GDP drivers. <CLICK> So lets talk a look at these in a little more detail… <CLICK> 9
  10. 10. © 2015 Citrix …the new utilities, <CLICK> intimate computing, <CLICK> and new GDP drivers. <CLICK> So lets talk a look at these in a little more detail… <CLICK> 10
  11. 11. © 2015 Citrix What do I mean my “the new utilities”, well it is really new services that have become essential to our society, things we cannot live without, or things that are changing what we traditionally thought of as a service. <ANIMATION – Compute Everywhere> Lets start with compute, public compute capacity such as Azure and AWS runs our homes, cities and businesses, if either of those two large vendors I just mentioned were to stop delivering their services, many aspects of our society would stop. Starting with nearly every app on your smart phone…. But while the public compute capacity runs our lives, we are also seeing a massive increase in compute at the edge via billions of new devices, the IOT explosion that we are right in the middle of in 2015. <CLICK – Wireless Networks> Everything is now connected those connected devices are often controlling safety critical parts of our lives, so the networks that keep these devices connected are becoming mission critical infrastructure also. When the network is delivering Netflix fails it is inconvenient. When the network controls our locks and our driverless cars fails it can be devastating. Consider the impact of the network failures caused by recent storm activity in Sydney, Australia when some mobile networks went down and customers were no longer able to make emergency calls. <CLICK – Free/Decentralized Power> The next trend or shift is the change to how we will consume power in the future. Power will become free… We are already seeing this with free energy to drive. Free energy to run your house. Sounds crazy. Who would have imagined you could buy a car and never pay to fuel it. Well you can today. If you own a Tesla you can use their free supercharger network.. and it’s not just Tesla, BMW and Nissan is doing as well. And it’s not just your car. You can buy solar panels for your house and never get an electric bill again; and now you can store that energy using the “Tesla Powerwall”. Solar is also the way that most of developing world is experiencing electricity 11
  12. 12. © 2015 Citrix What do I mean my “the new utilities”, well it is really new services that have become essential to our society, things we cannot live without, or things that are changing what we traditionally thought of as a service. <ANIMATION – Compute Everywhere> Lets start with compute, public compute capacity such as Azure and AWS runs our homes, cities and businesses, if either of those two large vendors I just mentioned were to stop delivering their services, many aspects of our society would stop. Starting with nearly every app on your smart phone…. But while the public compute capacity runs our lives, we are also seeing a massive increase in compute at the edge via billions of new devices, the IOT explosion that we are right in the middle of in 2015. <CLICK – Wireless Networks> Everything is now connected those connected devices are often controlling safety critical parts of our lives, so the networks that keep these devices connected are becoming mission critical infrastructure also. When the network is delivering Netflix fails it is inconvenient. When the network controls our locks and our driverless cars fails it can be devastating. Consider the impact of the network failures caused by recent storm activity in Sydney, Australia when some mobile networks went down and customers were no longer able to make emergency calls. <CLICK – Free/Decentralized Power> The next trend or shift is the change to how we will consume power in the future. Power will become free… We are already seeing this with free energy to drive. Free energy to run your house. Sounds crazy. Who would have imagined you could buy a car and never pay to fuel it. Well you can today. If you own a Tesla you can use their free supercharger network.. and it’s not just Tesla, BMW and Nissan is doing as well. And it’s not just your car. You can buy solar panels for your house and never get an electric bill again; and now you can store that energy using the “Tesla Powerwall”. Solar is also the way that most of developing world is experiencing electricity 12
  13. 13. © 2015 Citrix What do I mean my “the new utilities”, well it is really new services that have become essential to our society, things we cannot live without, or things that are changing what we traditionally thought of as a service. <ANIMATION – Compute Everywhere> Lets start with compute, public compute capacity such as Azure and AWS runs our homes, cities and businesses, if either of those two large vendors I just mentioned were to stop delivering their services, many aspects of our society would stop. Starting with nearly every app on your smart phone…. But while the public compute capacity runs our lives, we are also seeing a massive increase in compute at the edge via billions of new devices, the IOT explosion that we are right in the middle of in 2015. <CLICK – Wireless Networks> Everything is now connected those connected devices are often controlling safety critical parts of our lives, so the networks that keep these devices connected are becoming mission critical infrastructure also. When the network is delivering Netflix fails it is inconvenient. When the network controls our locks and our driverless cars fails it can be devastating. Consider the impact of the network failures caused by recent storm activity in Sydney, Australia when some mobile networks went down and customers were no longer able to make emergency calls. <CLICK – Free/Decentralized Power> The next trend or shift is the change to how we will consume power in the future. Power will become free… We are already seeing this with free energy to drive. Free energy to run your house. Sounds crazy. Who would have imagined you could buy a car and never pay to fuel it. Well you can today. If you own a Tesla you can use their free supercharger network.. and it’s not just Tesla, BMW and Nissan is doing as well. And it’s not just your car. You can buy solar panels for your house and never get an electric bill again; and now you can store that energy using the “Tesla Powerwall”. Solar is also the way that most of developing world is experiencing electricity 13
  14. 14. © 2015 Citrix The next trend is Intimate computing. This is computing we carry, wear, and in even embed in / on bodies. This computing is a witness to our lives and understands context of what we are doing, where we are, and what is going on around us. This context, as well as machine learning, enables these systems to anticipate our needs and reduce our explicit interactions with computers. We more naturally interact with the world that has computing embedded in it, where the best interface is no interface (enter the office and your workspace immediately comes up). Use your phone and it recommends that you need to exercise more, certainly my Samsung Note continues to nag me to do more walking and at the same time it can record my heart rate and blood oxygen level and give a health rating… <CLICK> As part of intimate computing we see augmented reality as a game changer. Imagine that you no longer are tied to using a display to visualize information, it can now be projected on to any surface or space, of indeed into any empty space as in this picture where are projection of a new building has been generated… This is the intersection of gaming software, sensing, and productivity software. This will maximize spatial memory to help us cope with an infotoxicated world. The spatial memory point is important as humans we are a visual creature, it is far easier top remember things than numbers on a page… <CLICK> 14
  15. 15. © 2015 Citrix The next trend is Intimate computing. This is computing we carry, wear, and in even embed in / on bodies. This computing is a witness to our lives and understands context of what we are doing, where we are, and what is going on around us. This context, as well as machine learning, enables these systems to anticipate our needs and reduce our explicit interactions with computers. We more naturally interact with the world that has computing embedded in it, where the best interface is no interface (enter the office and your workspace immediately comes up). Use your phone and it recommends that you need to exercise more, certainly my Samsung Note continues to nag me to do more walking and at the same time it can record my heart rate and blood oxygen level and give a health rating… <CLICK> As part of intimate computing we see augmented reality as a game changer. Imagine that you no longer are tied to using a display to visualize information, it can now be projected on to any surface or space, of indeed into any empty space as in this picture where are projection of a new building has been generated… This is the intersection of gaming software, sensing, and productivity software. This will maximize spatial memory to help us cope with an infotoxicated world. The spatial memory point is important as humans we are a visual creature, it is far easier top remember things than numbers on a page… <CLICK> 15
  16. 16. © 2015 Citrix The next trend is Intimate computing. This is computing we carry, wear, and in even embed in / on bodies. This computing is a witness to our lives and understands context of what we are doing, where we are, and what is going on around us. This context, as well as machine learning, enables these systems to anticipate our needs and reduce our explicit interactions with computers. We more naturally interact with the world that has computing embedded in it, where the best interface is no interface (enter the office and your workspace immediately comes up). Use your phone and it recommends that you need to exercise more, certainly my Samsung Note continues to nag me to do more walking and at the same time it can record my heart rate and blood oxygen level and give a health rating… <CLICK> As part of intimate computing we see augmented reality as a game changer. Imagine that you no longer are tied to using a display to visualize information, it can now be projected on to any surface or space, of indeed into any empty space as in this picture where are projection of a new building has been generated… This is the intersection of gaming software, sensing, and productivity software. This will maximize spatial memory to help us cope with an infotoxicated world. The spatial memory point is important as humans we are a visual creature, it is far easier top remember things than numbers on a page… <CLICK> 16
  17. 17. © 2015 Citrix The final trend I will cover today is new GDP drivers. While GDP can be driven by many forces, we see some particular technology ones that are relevant right now… The first of 3 Gross Domestic Product growth drivers that we believe are being underestimated is the Internet of Things. The Internet of Things represents the biggest market expansion of Information Technology ever, i.e. “IT outside the Office”. This includes everything from farms, to cities, to construction sites. We see new business models coming out of this like farming equipment companies that sell crop sensing by the acre. <CLICK – Sense & Connect Everything) This means that we can connect people and things together anywhere. This represents the end of data entry and guessing. Now we will know and control our worlds in real time. This enables more efficient use of resources, running of business, time efficiency of our lives, and city livability. 17
  18. 18. © 2015 Citrix The final trend I will cover today is new GDP drivers. While GDP can be driven by many forces, we see some particular technology ones that are relevant right now… The first of 3 Gross Domestic Product growth drivers that we believe are being underestimated is the Internet of Things. The Internet of Things represents the biggest market expansion of Information Technology ever, i.e. “IT outside the Office”. This includes everything from farms, to cities, to construction sites. We see new business models coming out of this like farming equipment companies that sell crop sensing by the acre. <CLICK – Sense & Connect Everything) This means that we can connect people and things together anywhere. This represents the end of data entry and guessing. Now we will know and control our worlds in real time. This enables more efficient use of resources, running of business, time efficiency of our lives, and city livability. 18
  19. 19. © 2015 Citrix <ANIMATION – Understand Everything> The second GDP driver is intelligent computing. Where as IoT allows us to collect everything, machine learning allows us to understand. <CLICK – Automate Everything> With everything on the network the effort to automate everything is dropping. Octoblu shows how it easy it can be to integrate people, services, and things to automate or businesses and lives. <CLICK – Hybrid Intelligence> Once we have the data coupled with machine learning, we see the rise of hybrid intelligence. This is not what people think of as artificial intelligence, but more knowledge specific systems that can act as a coach or advisor to workers. For example we are seeing the rise systems that can understand large bodies of legal text and help lawyers understand case law. We have IBM working very hard on their Watson project to apply the technology to verticals like cancer research where Watson can ingest large volumes of existing research and help find new patterns to solve complex problems. Your next assistant will be the agent that is running on your smart phone, think Siri or Cortana on steroids… 19
  20. 20. © 2015 Citrix <ANIMATION – Understand Everything> The second GDP driver is intelligent computing. Where as IoT allows us to collect everything, machine learning allows us to understand. <CLICK – Automate Everything> With everything on the network the effort to automate everything is dropping. Octoblu shows how it easy it can be to integrate people, services, and things to automate or businesses and lives. <CLICK – Hybrid Intelligence> Once we have the data coupled with machine learning, we see the rise of hybrid intelligence. This is not what people think of as artificial intelligence, but more knowledge specific systems that can act as a coach or advisor to workers. For example we are seeing the rise systems that can understand large bodies of legal text and help lawyers understand case law. We have IBM working very hard on their Watson project to apply the technology to verticals like cancer research where Watson can ingest large volumes of existing research and help find new patterns to solve complex problems. Your next assistant will be the agent that is running on your smart phone, think Siri or Cortana on steroids… 20
  21. 21. © 2015 Citrix <ANIMATION – Understand Everything> The second GDP driver is intelligent computing. Where as IoT allows us to collect everything, machine learning allows us to understand. <CLICK – Automate Everything> With everything on the network the effort to automate everything is dropping. Octoblu shows how it easy it can be to integrate people, services, and things to automate or businesses and lives. <CLICK – Hybrid Intelligence> Once we have the data coupled with machine learning, we see the rise of hybrid intelligence. This is not what people think of as artificial intelligence, but more knowledge specific systems that can act as a coach or advisor to workers. For example we are seeing the rise systems that can understand large bodies of legal text and help lawyers understand case law. We have IBM working very hard on their Watson project to apply the technology to verticals like cancer research where Watson can ingest large volumes of existing research and help find new patterns to solve complex problems. Your next assistant will be the agent that is running on your smart phone, think Siri or Cortana on steroids… 21
  22. 22. © 2015 Citrix <ANIMATION> The third GDP driver is robotics. The robots are already here they are just not widely distributed. Amazon has automated much of their warehousing and order fulfillment with robotics. Kiva systems grab the right stack of product and bring it to humans to pack the order. Amazon is now looking at robotic pick and place to eliminate humans from the loop. Amazon, Google, and Matternet are all experimenting with unmanned air vehicles for product delivery. Lowes is trialing the Oshbot robotic sales assistant that knows where everything is in the store and speaks many languages. Microsoft is patrolling their campus with KnightScope security robots. Mercedes drove their driverless car prototype to CES this year. Robots are becoming useful and pervasive, low cost automation robots like Baxter are affordable in any factory, new safety systems means robots no longer need to be in cages so that humans don’t accidentally run into them…. New automation use cases will drive down costs, more mundane jobs will be robotized and new classes of jobs will emerge managing robots… So I hope the three trends I’ve covered have given you a taste of what is to come in our future, I am not going to hand over to Guy and Matt who will deep dive into Work Transformed and Healthcare 22
  23. 23. © 2015 Citrix23
  24. 24. •  Well that was a fun video. Spaces will sense us, know who we are, now about our meetings and automate things for us to save us time. •  Work is undergoing a tremendous transformation. But what forces are causing this change. 24 © 2015 Citrix
  25. 25. © 2015 Citrix <CLICK – Infotoxicated> Brain has not evolved. Information has. <CLICK – Meaning and Engagement> A recent Gallup pole found that 87% of workers worldwide are disengaged at work. Another study found that 74% want to leave their jobs. This represents an epidemic of job dissatisfaction. Compound with the Millennials and Generation Z desire for greater meaning in their work and you have a force of massive change. <CLICK – Freelance> Freelancing is expected to grow to 40% by 2020 in the US. Corporations are treating freelancers more seriously with 50% YOY earnings growth for freelancers. People are working and living on their own terms. <CLICK – Remote / Flex> A survey at the Global Leadership summit found that a 1/3 of companies would have 50% Remote workers by 2020. Remote and Flex work is even being legislated as a right in countries like the UK. Research from the book the Digital Renaissance of Work has found a 20 to 50% productivity increase for remote workers. Offices have become interruption factories. <CLICK – Automated> An Oxford study found that 47% of US jobs are at high risk of being eliminated by machines learning and robotics over the next 10 to 20 years. This will shift the kind of jobs humans do much like the industrial revolution shifted the world from agriculture. <CLICK – Productivity> So why are people so much more productive when working remotely. Because offices and the tools that used to serve us like email and meetings are huge time sinks. Latest survey says we lose a whopping 4.8 hours a day. Hard to believe. Here are the numbers. The average employeee has 56 interruptions per day and spends 2 hours recovering from those interruptions. We spend about 62 hours a month in meetings and consider half that time wasted. That adds 1.6 hours a day of wasted meeting time. We spend about 30% of our time doing email and half of that is wasted. That adds 1.2hr of wasted time. That’s 4.8 hours or more than half of the typical workday. No wonder people are compelled to work extra hours outside the office. <CLICK – Facilities ROI> It’s not just the workers that are feeling the forces of workplace transformation. The enterprise itself is struggling. According to UnWork, a typical company’s second largest expense, the office, is less than <45% utilized. That is a horrible return on investment that is driving companies to rethink offices. <CLICK – Innovation Speed> In the age of surprise, innovation happens faster than ever before due to abundant access to information, tools, and the ability to project creations widely. A Mckinsey Study found that CEOs expect 15 to 50% of growth from disruptive technologies. Speed of innovation has become a survival skill for the modern corporation. <CLICK – IT Shifts> 25
  26. 26. © 2015 Citrix <CLICK – Infotoxicated> Brain has not evolved. Information has. <CLICK – Meaning and Engagement> A recent Gallup pole found that 87% of workers worldwide are disengaged at work. Another study found that 74% want to leave their jobs. This represents an epidemic of job dissatisfaction. Compound with the Millennials and Generation Z desire for greater meaning in their work and you have a force of massive change. <CLICK – Freelance> Freelancing is expected to grow to 40% by 2020 in the US. Corporations are treating freelancers more seriously with 50% YOY earnings growth for freelancers. People are working and living on their own terms. <CLICK – Remote / Flex> A survey at the Global Leadership summit found that a 1/3 of companies would have 50% Remote workers by 2020. Remote and Flex work is even being legislated as a right in countries like the UK. Research from the book the Digital Renaissance of Work has found a 20 to 50% productivity increase for remote workers. Offices have become interruption factories. <CLICK – Automated> An Oxford study found that 47% of US jobs are at high risk of being eliminated by machines learning and robotics over the next 10 to 20 years. This will shift the kind of jobs humans do much like the industrial revolution shifted the world from agriculture. <CLICK – Productivity> So why are people so much more productive when working remotely. Because offices and the tools that used to serve us like email and meetings are huge time sinks. Latest survey says we lose a whopping 4.8 hours a day. Hard to believe. Here are the numbers. The average employeee has 56 interruptions per day and spends 2 hours recovering from those interruptions. We spend about 62 hours a month in meetings and consider half that time wasted. That adds 1.6 hours a day of wasted meeting time. We spend about 30% of our time doing email and half of that is wasted. That adds 1.2hr of wasted time. That’s 4.8 hours or more than half of the typical workday. No wonder people are compelled to work extra hours outside the office. <CLICK – Facilities ROI> It’s not just the workers that are feeling the forces of workplace transformation. The enterprise itself is struggling. According to UnWork, a typical company’s second largest expense, the office, is less than <45% utilized. That is a horrible return on investment that is driving companies to rethink offices. <CLICK – Innovation Speed> In the age of surprise, innovation happens faster than ever before due to abundant access to information, tools, and the ability to project creations widely. A Mckinsey Study found that CEOs expect 15 to 50% of growth from disruptive technologies. Speed of innovation has become a survival skill for the modern corporation. <CLICK – IT Shifts> 26
  27. 27. © 2015 Citrix <ANIMATION> So we believe these forces are causing 3 major changes in work: 1 Flipping the Workplace <CLICK> 2 Re-Balancing Work <CLICK> 3 Changing Spaces 27
  28. 28. © 2015 Citrix <ANIMATION> So we believe these forces are causing 3 major changes in work: 1 Flipping the Workplace <CLICK> 2 Re-Balancing Work <CLICK> 3 Changing Spaces 28
  29. 29. © 2015 Citrix <ANIMATION> So we believe these forces are causing 3 major changes in work: 1 Flipping the Workplace <CLICK> 2 Re-Balancing Work <CLICK> 3 Changing Spaces 29
  30. 30. © 2015 Citrix A typical employee might spend 80% of their time at the office and 20% of the time on travel for work. <CLICK> We believe the workplace will flip. Instead of the Tyranny of Location we spend more time at customer sites, partner sites, and whatever place suites us best. Instead of the Tyranny of Time we can optimize our work times to better suite our lives and productivity. We can get back hours of commute time. We can overcome the team scalability problems of a physical location with tools that allow us to digitially co-locate the right people whenever we want. We can reduce facility cost and have spaces more suited to activities. We will talk more about that in a minute. 30
  31. 31. © 2015 Citrix A typical employee might spend 80% of their time at the office and 20% of the time on travel for work. <CLICK> We believe the workplace will flip. Instead of the Tyranny of Location we spend more time at customer sites, partner sites, and whatever place suites us best. Instead of the Tyranny of Time we can optimize our work times to better suite our lives and productivity. We can get back hours of commute time. We can overcome the team scalability problems of a physical location with tools that allow us to digitially co-locate the right people whenever we want. We can reduce facility cost and have spaces more suited to activities. We will talk more about that in a minute. 31
  32. 32. © 2015 Citrix Unlike work life balance, we are talking about rebalancing the activities we do at work to increase engagement, productivity, and get back some of those 4.8 hours of wasted time. <CLICK - Individual work> This means re-balancing and optimizing individual work, <CLICK – Collaborative Work> collaborative work, and <CLICK – Free Cognitive Bandwidth> freeing up cognitive bandwidth to do the things that really matter. <FREE COGNITIVE BANDWIDTH> <CLICK – Free Time> There are a lot of ways we can free up time. One is getting an hour or two back from our commutes. One that Timothy Ferris recommends is batching like activities for efficiency (much like and industrial production line batches activities). For instance turn off email notifications and work through email a few times each day. You will be amazed at how less distracted this makes you. Another trick is to shorten meetings. Why do meetings last increments of 30 minutes? Is all work really done in 30 minute increments? Why not schedule meetings for less time and end them whenever you have achieved your goal. <CLICK – Reduce> The book the organized mind suggests three things we can do to boost our productivity. Reduce interruptions, reduce context switching, and reduce decision fatigue. Steve Jobs was famous for wearing the same outfit, he eliminated the decision about what to wear each day. US president Obama aggressively reduces the unnecessary decisions he has to make so he performs better on the important ones. Studies show that we perform worse the more decisions we make, regardless of how trivial. The cost of an interruption isn’t just the time for the interruption, it is the context switching to get back into what you were doing. So turn off those notifications and close those doors when your in flow. <CLICK – Environment for success> Modern offices are interruption factories, we can gain productivity by working remotely when we have deep individual work to do. <CLICK – Focus> The other thing is to question what your focusing on. Pareto’s Law observes that 20% of the effort gets 80% of the results. <INDIVIDUAL WORK> 32
  33. 33. © 2015 Citrix Unlike work life balance, we are talking about rebalancing the activities we do at work to increase engagement, productivity, and get back some of those 4.8 hours of wasted time. <CLICK - Individual work> This means re-balancing and optimizing individual work, <CLICK – Collaborative Work> collaborative work, and <CLICK – Free Cognitive Bandwidth> freeing up cognitive bandwidth to do the things that really matter. <FREE COGNITIVE BANDWIDTH> <CLICK – Free Time> There are a lot of ways we can free up time. One is getting an hour or two back from our commutes. One that Timothy Ferris recommends is batching like activities for efficiency (much like and industrial production line batches activities). For instance turn off email notifications and work through email a few times each day. You will be amazed at how less distracted this makes you. Another trick is to shorten meetings. Why do meetings last increments of 30 minutes? Is all work really done in 30 minute increments? Why not schedule meetings for less time and end them whenever you have achieved your goal. <CLICK – Reduce> The book the organized mind suggests three things we can do to boost our productivity. Reduce interruptions, reduce context switching, and reduce decision fatigue. Steve Jobs was famous for wearing the same outfit, he eliminated the decision about what to wear each day. US president Obama aggressively reduces the unnecessary decisions he has to make so he performs better on the important ones. Studies show that we perform worse the more decisions we make, regardless of how trivial. The cost of an interruption isn’t just the time for the interruption, it is the context switching to get back into what you were doing. So turn off those notifications and close those doors when your in flow. <CLICK – Environment for success> Modern offices are interruption factories, we can gain productivity by working remotely when we have deep individual work to do. <CLICK – Focus> The other thing is to question what your focusing on. Pareto’s Law observes that 20% of the effort gets 80% of the results. <INDIVIDUAL WORK> 33
  34. 34. © 2015 Citrix Unlike work life balance, we are talking about rebalancing the activities we do at work to increase engagement, productivity, and get back some of those 4.8 hours of wasted time. <CLICK - Individual work> This means re-balancing and optimizing individual work, <CLICK – Collaborative Work> collaborative work, and <CLICK – Free Cognitive Bandwidth> freeing up cognitive bandwidth to do the things that really matter. <FREE COGNITIVE BANDWIDTH> <CLICK – Free Time> There are a lot of ways we can free up time. One is getting an hour or two back from our commutes. One that Timothy Ferris recommends is batching like activities for efficiency (much like and industrial production line batches activities). For instance turn off email notifications and work through email a few times each day. You will be amazed at how less distracted this makes you. Another trick is to shorten meetings. Why do meetings last increments of 30 minutes? Is all work really done in 30 minute increments? Why not schedule meetings for less time and end them whenever you have achieved your goal. <CLICK – Reduce> The book the organized mind suggests three things we can do to boost our productivity. Reduce interruptions, reduce context switching, and reduce decision fatigue. Steve Jobs was famous for wearing the same outfit, he eliminated the decision about what to wear each day. US president Obama aggressively reduces the unnecessary decisions he has to make so he performs better on the important ones. Studies show that we perform worse the more decisions we make, regardless of how trivial. The cost of an interruption isn’t just the time for the interruption, it is the context switching to get back into what you were doing. So turn off those notifications and close those doors when your in flow. <CLICK – Environment for success> Modern offices are interruption factories, we can gain productivity by working remotely when we have deep individual work to do. <CLICK – Focus> The other thing is to question what your focusing on. Pareto’s Law observes that 20% of the effort gets 80% of the results. <INDIVIDUAL WORK> 34
  35. 35. © 2015 Citrix Unlike work life balance, we are talking about rebalancing the activities we do at work to increase engagement, productivity, and get back some of those 4.8 hours of wasted time. <CLICK - Individual work> This means re-balancing and optimizing individual work, <CLICK – Collaborative Work> collaborative work, and <CLICK – Free Cognitive Bandwidth> freeing up cognitive bandwidth to do the things that really matter. <FREE COGNITIVE BANDWIDTH> <CLICK – Free Time> There are a lot of ways we can free up time. One is getting an hour or two back from our commutes. One that Timothy Ferris recommends is batching like activities for efficiency (much like and industrial production line batches activities). For instance turn off email notifications and work through email a few times each day. You will be amazed at how less distracted this makes you. Another trick is to shorten meetings. Why do meetings last increments of 30 minutes? Is all work really done in 30 minute increments? Why not schedule meetings for less time and end them whenever you have achieved your goal. <CLICK – Reduce> The book the organized mind suggests three things we can do to boost our productivity. Reduce interruptions, reduce context switching, and reduce decision fatigue. Steve Jobs was famous for wearing the same outfit, he eliminated the decision about what to wear each day. US president Obama aggressively reduces the unnecessary decisions he has to make so he performs better on the important ones. Studies show that we perform worse the more decisions we make, regardless of how trivial. The cost of an interruption isn’t just the time for the interruption, it is the context switching to get back into what you were doing. So turn off those notifications and close those doors when your in flow. <CLICK – Environment for success> Modern offices are interruption factories, we can gain productivity by working remotely when we have deep individual work to do. <CLICK – Focus> The other thing is to question what your focusing on. Pareto’s Law observes that 20% of the effort gets 80% of the results. <INDIVIDUAL WORK> 35
  36. 36. © 2015 Citrix Unlike work life balance, we are talking about rebalancing the activities we do at work to increase engagement, productivity, and get back some of those 4.8 hours of wasted time. <CLICK - Individual work> This means re-balancing and optimizing individual work, <CLICK – Collaborative Work> collaborative work, and <CLICK – Free Cognitive Bandwidth> freeing up cognitive bandwidth to do the things that really matter. <FREE COGNITIVE BANDWIDTH> <CLICK – Free Time> There are a lot of ways we can free up time. One is getting an hour or two back from our commutes. One that Timothy Ferris recommends is batching like activities for efficiency (much like and industrial production line batches activities). For instance turn off email notifications and work through email a few times each day. You will be amazed at how less distracted this makes you. Another trick is to shorten meetings. Why do meetings last increments of 30 minutes? Is all work really done in 30 minute increments? Why not schedule meetings for less time and end them whenever you have achieved your goal. <CLICK – Reduce> The book the organized mind suggests three things we can do to boost our productivity. Reduce interruptions, reduce context switching, and reduce decision fatigue. Steve Jobs was famous for wearing the same outfit, he eliminated the decision about what to wear each day. US president Obama aggressively reduces the unnecessary decisions he has to make so he performs better on the important ones. Studies show that we perform worse the more decisions we make, regardless of how trivial. The cost of an interruption isn’t just the time for the interruption, it is the context switching to get back into what you were doing. So turn off those notifications and close those doors when your in flow. <CLICK – Environment for success> Modern offices are interruption factories, we can gain productivity by working remotely when we have deep individual work to do. <CLICK – Focus> The other thing is to question what your focusing on. Pareto’s Law observes that 20% of the effort gets 80% of the results. <INDIVIDUAL WORK> 36
  37. 37. © 2015 Citrix So what can we do to make better use of space or rather have our spaces better suit us? <CLICK – Co-Locate on Demand> Many office-less companies, like Wordpress, use their facility savings to allow teams to co-locate when they need to (and wherever they want). Part of the practice is that out of work context collaboration that happens at dinner or the pub to allow the team to discuss things in a relaxed enviroment. <CLICK – Reconfigurable> We toured many spaces in coming up with this recommendation including Ideo, Autodesk Pier 9, Maya Design, and our own design studio. A common theme was creating spaces that could be reconfigured to suite an activity. This means things on rollers, wifi everywhere, power everywhere, and basically that everything can be moved. Maya Design actually creates project space on demand, they have portable Kivas (oval rooms surrounded by whiteboards), and portable whiteboard systems. <CLICK – Maximize Spatial Memory> Many studies have shown the productivity improvement of going from one display to two displays. Design Thinking practices surround people in whiteboards and stickies to maximize the working set of spatially referenceable information. The reason for this is something that memorization champions have known for a long time, our spatial memory allows us to remember, reference, and access more things simultaneously. We can only remember of few numbers, but we can remember where 10s of 1000s of objects are in our homes. We spatially organize the things in our lives: tools are in the garage, cooking utensils in the kitchen, keys on the key hook, etc. New technology that intersects gaming technology and productivity software are intersecting in augmented reality with systems like Microsoft Hololens, Magic Leap, and Occulus Rift. Forget two displays or a 60 in 4K display, imagine your whole world as a virtually mapable space. This will drive completely new 37
  38. 38. © 2015 Citrix So what can we do to make better use of space or rather have our spaces better suit us? <CLICK – Co-Locate on Demand> Many office-less companies, like Wordpress, use their facility savings to allow teams to co-locate when they need to (and wherever they want). Part of the practice is that out of work context collaboration that happens at dinner or the pub to allow the team to discuss things in a relaxed enviroment. <CLICK – Reconfigurable> We toured many spaces in coming up with this recommendation including Ideo, Autodesk Pier 9, Maya Design, and our own design studio. A common theme was creating spaces that could be reconfigured to suite an activity. This means things on rollers, wifi everywhere, power everywhere, and basically that everything can be moved. Maya Design actually creates project space on demand, they have portable Kivas (oval rooms surrounded by whiteboards), and portable whiteboard systems. <CLICK – Maximize Spatial Memory> Many studies have shown the productivity improvement of going from one display to two displays. Design Thinking practices surround people in whiteboards and stickies to maximize the working set of spatially referenceable information. The reason for this is something that memorization champions have known for a long time, our spatial memory allows us to remember, reference, and access more things simultaneously. We can only remember of few numbers, but we can remember where 10s of 1000s of objects are in our homes. We spatially organize the things in our lives: tools are in the garage, cooking utensils in the kitchen, keys on the key hook, etc. New technology that intersects gaming technology and productivity software are intersecting in augmented reality with systems like Microsoft Hololens, Magic Leap, and Occulus Rift. Forget two displays or a 60 in 4K display, imagine your whole world as a virtually mapable space. This will drive completely new 38
  39. 39. © 2015 Citrix So what can we do to make better use of space or rather have our spaces better suit us? <CLICK – Co-Locate on Demand> Many office-less companies, like Wordpress, use their facility savings to allow teams to co-locate when they need to (and wherever they want). Part of the practice is that out of work context collaboration that happens at dinner or the pub to allow the team to discuss things in a relaxed enviroment. <CLICK – Reconfigurable> We toured many spaces in coming up with this recommendation including Ideo, Autodesk Pier 9, Maya Design, and our own design studio. A common theme was creating spaces that could be reconfigured to suite an activity. This means things on rollers, wifi everywhere, power everywhere, and basically that everything can be moved. Maya Design actually creates project space on demand, they have portable Kivas (oval rooms surrounded by whiteboards), and portable whiteboard systems. <CLICK – Maximize Spatial Memory> Many studies have shown the productivity improvement of going from one display to two displays. Design Thinking practices surround people in whiteboards and stickies to maximize the working set of spatially referenceable information. The reason for this is something that memorization champions have known for a long time, our spatial memory allows us to remember, reference, and access more things simultaneously. We can only remember of few numbers, but we can remember where 10s of 1000s of objects are in our homes. We spatially organize the things in our lives: tools are in the garage, cooking utensils in the kitchen, keys on the key hook, etc. New technology that intersects gaming technology and productivity software are intersecting in augmented reality with systems like Microsoft Hololens, Magic Leap, and Occulus Rift. Forget two displays or a 60 in 4K display, imagine your whole world as a virtually mapable space. This will drive completely new 39
  40. 40. © 2015 Citrix So what can we do to make better use of space or rather have our spaces better suit us? <CLICK – Co-Locate on Demand> Many office-less companies, like Wordpress, use their facility savings to allow teams to co-locate when they need to (and wherever they want). Part of the practice is that out of work context collaboration that happens at dinner or the pub to allow the team to discuss things in a relaxed enviroment. <CLICK – Reconfigurable> We toured many spaces in coming up with this recommendation including Ideo, Autodesk Pier 9, Maya Design, and our own design studio. A common theme was creating spaces that could be reconfigured to suite an activity. This means things on rollers, wifi everywhere, power everywhere, and basically that everything can be moved. Maya Design actually creates project space on demand, they have portable Kivas (oval rooms surrounded by whiteboards), and portable whiteboard systems. <CLICK – Maximize Spatial Memory> Many studies have shown the productivity improvement of going from one display to two displays. Design Thinking practices surround people in whiteboards and stickies to maximize the working set of spatially referenceable information. The reason for this is something that memorization champions have known for a long time, our spatial memory allows us to remember, reference, and access more things simultaneously. We can only remember of few numbers, but we can remember where 10s of 1000s of objects are in our homes. We spatially organize the things in our lives: tools are in the garage, cooking utensils in the kitchen, keys on the key hook, etc. New technology that intersects gaming technology and productivity software are intersecting in augmented reality with systems like Microsoft Hololens, Magic Leap, and Occulus Rift. Forget two displays or a 60 in 4K display, imagine your whole world as a virtually mapable space. This will drive completely new 40
  41. 41. © 2015 Citrix So what can we do to make better use of space or rather have our spaces better suit us? <CLICK – Co-Locate on Demand> Many office-less companies, like Wordpress, use their facility savings to allow teams to co-locate when they need to (and wherever they want). Part of the practice is that out of work context collaboration that happens at dinner or the pub to allow the team to discuss things in a relaxed enviroment. <CLICK – Reconfigurable> We toured many spaces in coming up with this recommendation including Ideo, Autodesk Pier 9, Maya Design, and our own design studio. A common theme was creating spaces that could be reconfigured to suite an activity. This means things on rollers, wifi everywhere, power everywhere, and basically that everything can be moved. Maya Design actually creates project space on demand, they have portable Kivas (oval rooms surrounded by whiteboards), and portable whiteboard systems. <CLICK – Maximize Spatial Memory> Many studies have shown the productivity improvement of going from one display to two displays. Design Thinking practices surround people in whiteboards and stickies to maximize the working set of spatially referenceable information. The reason for this is something that memorization champions have known for a long time, our spatial memory allows us to remember, reference, and access more things simultaneously. We can only remember of few numbers, but we can remember where 10s of 1000s of objects are in our homes. We spatially organize the things in our lives: tools are in the garage, cooking utensils in the kitchen, keys on the key hook, etc. New technology that intersects gaming technology and productivity software are intersecting in augmented reality with systems like Microsoft Hololens, Magic Leap, and Occulus Rift. Forget two displays or a 60 in 4K display, imagine your whole world as a virtually mapable space. This will drive completely new 41
  42. 42. © 2015 Citrix So what can we do to make better use of space or rather have our spaces better suit us? <CLICK – Co-Locate on Demand> Many office-less companies, like Wordpress, use their facility savings to allow teams to co-locate when they need to (and wherever they want). Part of the practice is that out of work context collaboration that happens at dinner or the pub to allow the team to discuss things in a relaxed enviroment. <CLICK – Reconfigurable> We toured many spaces in coming up with this recommendation including Ideo, Autodesk Pier 9, Maya Design, and our own design studio. A common theme was creating spaces that could be reconfigured to suite an activity. This means things on rollers, wifi everywhere, power everywhere, and basically that everything can be moved. Maya Design actually creates project space on demand, they have portable Kivas (oval rooms surrounded by whiteboards), and portable whiteboard systems. <CLICK – Maximize Spatial Memory> Many studies have shown the productivity improvement of going from one display to two displays. Design Thinking practices surround people in whiteboards and stickies to maximize the working set of spatially referenceable information. The reason for this is something that memorization champions have known for a long time, our spatial memory allows us to remember, reference, and access more things simultaneously. We can only remember of few numbers, but we can remember where 10s of 1000s of objects are in our homes. We spatially organize the things in our lives: tools are in the garage, cooking utensils in the kitchen, keys on the key hook, etc. New technology that intersects gaming technology and productivity software are intersecting in augmented reality with systems like Microsoft Hololens, Magic Leap, and Occulus Rift. Forget two displays or a 60 in 4K display, imagine your whole world as a virtually mapable space. This will drive completely new 42
  43. 43. © 2015 Citrix So what can we do to make better use of space or rather have our spaces better suit us? <CLICK – Co-Locate on Demand> Many office-less companies, like Wordpress, use their facility savings to allow teams to co-locate when they need to (and wherever they want). Part of the practice is that out of work context collaboration that happens at dinner or the pub to allow the team to discuss things in a relaxed enviroment. <CLICK – Reconfigurable> We toured many spaces in coming up with this recommendation including Ideo, Autodesk Pier 9, Maya Design, and our own design studio. A common theme was creating spaces that could be reconfigured to suite an activity. This means things on rollers, wifi everywhere, power everywhere, and basically that everything can be moved. Maya Design actually creates project space on demand, they have portable Kivas (oval rooms surrounded by whiteboards), and portable whiteboard systems. <CLICK – Maximize Spatial Memory> Many studies have shown the productivity improvement of going from one display to two displays. Design Thinking practices surround people in whiteboards and stickies to maximize the working set of spatially referenceable information. The reason for this is something that memorization champions have known for a long time, our spatial memory allows us to remember, reference, and access more things simultaneously. We can only remember of few numbers, but we can remember where 10s of 1000s of objects are in our homes. We spatially organize the things in our lives: tools are in the garage, cooking utensils in the kitchen, keys on the key hook, etc. New technology that intersects gaming technology and productivity software are intersecting in augmented reality with systems like Microsoft Hololens, Magic Leap, and Occulus Rift. Forget two displays or a 60 in 4K display, imagine your whole world as a virtually mapable space. This will drive completely new 43
  44. 44. © 2015 Citrix44
  45. 45. © 2015 Citrix Welcome to our look at a future of healthcare. In this year’s landscape we take a look at how the internet of things is working to disrupt the entrench models of healthcare. In the Citrix Technology Office we have spent many of the last few months talking to healthcare professionals about the challenges facing their industry. In fact one of these professionals happens to be my father-in-law, an ophthalmologist with over 40 year of experience. We’ve seen significant changes since then but the way clinicians are doing healthcare really has not changed all that much. In fact, my father-in-law still keeps paper records like he did 40 years ago. …and this is a trend we continue to see across the entire healthcare space … <CLICK> 45
  46. 46. © 2015 Citrix …but healthcare is going through a lot of changes. It’s an exciting time and we see technology becoming more than a supporting infrastructure to healthcare. It’s becoming a diagnostic tool, and it’s enabling clinicians and patients access to information they have lacked for many years. IoT technology in particular is driving this disruption… <CLICK> 46
  47. 47. © 2015 Citrix At Citrix, we are calling this abundance of healthcare technology the “Healthcare of Things” 47
  48. 48. © 2015 Citrix At Citrix, we are calling this abundance of healthcare technology the “Healthcare of Things” 48
  49. 49. © 2015 Citrix Healthcare is in need of disruption and there are a number of themes that are driving this disruption across the healthcare space. Lets take a look at some of these themes. <CLICK> 49
  50. 50. © 2015 Citrix By far the biggest issue is cost. Healthcare spending is unsustainable. The cost of healthcare seems to be growing at an ever increasing rate. This is a major crisis. <Click> According to research by the World Bank, the US currently spends over $9000 per head on healthcare – by far the largest, but not the only country facing a healthcare spending crisis. <Click> If left unchecked, healthcare costs will continue to grow from the already staggering 18% of US GDP to an estimated 34% of GDP by 2040. <Click> As TheEconomist reported – “The US does not have a debt problem, it has a healthcare debt problem”. <Click> Did you know one of the biggest ways we can reduce the cost of healthcare is by addressing inefficiencies and wastage. We can gain big savings by keeping people out of hospital or finding alternative treatment models. 50
  51. 51. © 2015 Citrix By far the biggest issue is cost. Healthcare spending is unsustainable. The cost of healthcare seems to be growing at an ever increasing rate. This is a major crisis. <Click> According to research by the World Bank, the US currently spends over $9000 per head on healthcare – by far the largest, but not the only country facing a healthcare spending crisis. <Click> If left unchecked, healthcare costs will continue to grow from the already staggering 18% of US GDP to an estimated 34% of GDP by 2040. <Click> As TheEconomist reported – “The US does not have a debt problem, it has a healthcare debt problem”. <Click> Did you know one of the biggest ways we can reduce the cost of healthcare is by addressing inefficiencies and wastage. We can gain big savings by keeping people out of hospital or finding alternative treatment models. 51
  52. 52. © 2015 Citrix By far the biggest issue is cost. Healthcare spending is unsustainable. The cost of healthcare seems to be growing at an ever increasing rate. This is a major crisis. <Click> According to research by the World Bank, the US currently spends over $9000 per head on healthcare – by far the largest, but not the only country facing a healthcare spending crisis. <Click> If left unchecked, healthcare costs will continue to grow from the already staggering 18% of US GDP to an estimated 34% of GDP by 2040. <Click> As TheEconomist reported – “The US does not have a debt problem, it has a healthcare debt problem”. <Click> Did you know one of the biggest ways we can reduce the cost of healthcare is by addressing inefficiencies and wastage. We can gain big savings by keeping people out of hospital or finding alternative treatment models. 52
  53. 53. © 2015 Citrix By far the biggest issue is cost. Healthcare spending is unsustainable. The cost of healthcare seems to be growing at an ever increasing rate. This is a major crisis. <Click> According to research by the World Bank, the US currently spends over $9000 per head on healthcare – by far the largest, but not the only country facing a healthcare spending crisis. <Click> If left unchecked, healthcare costs will continue to grow from the already staggering 18% of US GDP to an estimated 34% of GDP by 2040. <Click> As TheEconomist reported – “The US does not have a debt problem, it has a healthcare debt problem”. <Click> Did you know one of the biggest ways we can reduce the cost of healthcare is by addressing inefficiencies and wastage. We can gain big savings by keeping people out of hospital or finding alternative treatment models. 53
  54. 54. © 2015 Citrix We also need to improve patient outcomes. Traditionally medicine has been a fee-for-service model. Where I get billed for every encounter and everything the doctor uses. For those that have ever been exposed to medical bill you will understand how complete it is. Regulators, payers and patients are forcing a change to a value based model of medicine where the providers are measured (incentivize) based on the health outcomes of the patient. Therefore tools to improve patient health outcomes are in high demand. This mandates betters tools to improve the accuracy and timeliness of diagnosis and a sharing and collaborative care environment. In the future, tools will exist that will make it far easier for members of care giver team to exchange information with one another. Core to this, is reducing hospital admissions – the hospital will become the place of last resort. <CLICK> 54
  55. 55. © 2015 Citrix We also need to improve patient outcomes. Traditionally medicine has been a fee-for-service model. Where I get billed for every encounter and everything the doctor uses. For those that have ever been exposed to medical bill you will understand how complete it is. Regulators, payers and patients are forcing a change to a value based model of medicine where the providers are measured (incentivize) based on the health outcomes of the patient. Therefore tools to improve patient health outcomes are in high demand. This mandates betters tools to improve the accuracy and timeliness of diagnosis and a sharing and collaborative care environment. In the future, tools will exist that will make it far easier for members of care giver team to exchange information with one another. Core to this, is reducing hospital admissions – the hospital will become the place of last resort. <CLICK> 55
  56. 56. © 2015 Citrix With the rise of the healthcare of things we will see a huge increase in the amount of health data that we will be able to collect. Central to delivering these better patient outcomes is to take maximum advantage of this data, not just for the individual but for the benefit of the greater society. We need to unleash the data from it’s silos and embrace wide scale interoperability. Vendors need to stop thinking that they own the data … it is the people’s health data and we can do so much more by aggregating and correlating this information. Population Health is a huge beneficiary of healthcare of things. 56
  57. 57. © 2015 Citrix So lets look at some these “things” or more appropriately Connected Health Things. We start off with the personal health trackers that many of us use today like the Fitbit, Basis Peak, Vivofit and the new Apple Watch. Personal health devices are booming and we are going see these devices become more than just personal fitness trackers. <CLICK> We will see the rise of the bio sensors. Such as patches that can monitor, in realtime , your blood chemistry, glucose and other vitals and deliver this data immediately to your clinician. Things will transform visits with medical professionals. <CLICK> We will see the growth of integrated wearables and smart fabric that integrate monitoring devices into clothing and footwear. <CLICK> We’re also seeing some other cool innovations such as smart pills and other diagnostic tools such as wearable ECG monitors you can take home from the hospital or doctors office and chronic or acute conditions can be monitored remotely. Traditional these sorts of conditions would have required admission or in-patient monitoring. The smart bedroom will displace the hospital. Most importantly, these devices will all integrate together to exchange information, in real-time, to produce much more meaningful results and also encouraging greater adoption. Lastly, the Healthcare of Things will also help by reminding us to take prescriptions, engage in therapies and make healthy choices so health parameters stay within acceptable, long-term boundaries. 57
  58. 58. © 2015 Citrix So lets look at some these “things” or more appropriately Connected Health Things. We start off with the personal health trackers that many of us use today like the Fitbit, Basis Peak, Vivofit and the new Apple Watch. Personal health devices are booming and we are going see these devices become more than just personal fitness trackers. <CLICK> We will see the rise of the bio sensors. Such as patches that can monitor, in realtime , your blood chemistry, glucose and other vitals and deliver this data immediately to your clinician. Things will transform visits with medical professionals. <CLICK> We will see the growth of integrated wearables and smart fabric that integrate monitoring devices into clothing and footwear. <CLICK> We’re also seeing some other cool innovations such as smart pills and other diagnostic tools such as wearable ECG monitors you can take home from the hospital or doctors office and chronic or acute conditions can be monitored remotely. Traditional these sorts of conditions would have required admission or in-patient monitoring. The smart bedroom will displace the hospital. Most importantly, these devices will all integrate together to exchange information, in real-time, to produce much more meaningful results and also encouraging greater adoption. Lastly, the Healthcare of Things will also help by reminding us to take prescriptions, engage in therapies and make healthy choices so health parameters stay within acceptable, long-term boundaries. 58
  59. 59. © 2015 Citrix So lets look at some these “things” or more appropriately Connected Health Things. We start off with the personal health trackers that many of us use today like the Fitbit, Basis Peak, Vivofit and the new Apple Watch. Personal health devices are booming and we are going see these devices become more than just personal fitness trackers. <CLICK> We will see the rise of the bio sensors. Such as patches that can monitor, in realtime , your blood chemistry, glucose and other vitals and deliver this data immediately to your clinician. Things will transform visits with medical professionals. <CLICK> We will see the growth of integrated wearables and smart fabric that integrate monitoring devices into clothing and footwear. <CLICK> We’re also seeing some other cool innovations such as smart pills and other diagnostic tools such as wearable ECG monitors you can take home from the hospital or doctors office and chronic or acute conditions can be monitored remotely. Traditional these sorts of conditions would have required admission or in-patient monitoring. The smart bedroom will displace the hospital. Most importantly, these devices will all integrate together to exchange information, in real-time, to produce much more meaningful results and also encouraging greater adoption. Lastly, the Healthcare of Things will also help by reminding us to take prescriptions, engage in therapies and make healthy choices so health parameters stay within acceptable, long-term boundaries. 59
  60. 60. © 2015 Citrix So lets look at some these “things” or more appropriately Connected Health Things. We start off with the personal health trackers that many of us use today like the Fitbit, Basis Peak, Vivofit and the new Apple Watch. Personal health devices are booming and we are going see these devices become more than just personal fitness trackers. <CLICK> We will see the rise of the bio sensors. Such as patches that can monitor, in realtime , your blood chemistry, glucose and other vitals and deliver this data immediately to your clinician. Things will transform visits with medical professionals. <CLICK> We will see the growth of integrated wearables and smart fabric that integrate monitoring devices into clothing and footwear. <CLICK> We’re also seeing some other cool innovations such as smart pills and other diagnostic tools such as wearable ECG monitors you can take home from the hospital or doctors office and chronic or acute conditions can be monitored remotely. Traditional these sorts of conditions would have required admission or in-patient monitoring. The smart bedroom will displace the hospital. Most importantly, these devices will all integrate together to exchange information, in real-time, to produce much more meaningful results and also encouraging greater adoption. Lastly, the Healthcare of Things will also help by reminding us to take prescriptions, engage in therapies and make healthy choices so health parameters stay within acceptable, long-term boundaries. 60
  61. 61. © 2015 Citrix So lets look at some these “things” or more appropriately Connected Health Things. We start off with the personal health trackers that many of us use today like the Fitbit, Basis Peak, Vivofit and the new Apple Watch. Personal health devices are booming and we are going see these devices become more than just personal fitness trackers. <CLICK> We will see the rise of the bio sensors. Such as patches that can monitor, in realtime , your blood chemistry, glucose and other vitals and deliver this data immediately to your clinician. Things will transform visits with medical professionals. <CLICK> We will see the growth of integrated wearables and smart fabric that integrate monitoring devices into clothing and footwear. <CLICK> We’re also seeing some other cool innovations such as smart pills and other diagnostic tools such as wearable ECG monitors you can take home from the hospital or doctors office and chronic or acute conditions can be monitored remotely. Traditional these sorts of conditions would have required admission or in-patient monitoring. The smart bedroom will displace the hospital. Most importantly, these devices will all integrate together to exchange information, in real-time, to produce much more meaningful results and also encouraging greater adoption. Lastly, the Healthcare of Things will also help by reminding us to take prescriptions, engage in therapies and make healthy choices so health parameters stay within acceptable, long-term boundaries. 61
  62. 62. © 2015 Citrix So lets look at some these “things” or more appropriately Connected Health Things. We start off with the personal health trackers that many of us use today like the Fitbit, Basis Peak, Vivofit and the new Apple Watch. Personal health devices are booming and we are going see these devices become more than just personal fitness trackers. <CLICK> We will see the rise of the bio sensors. Such as patches that can monitor, in realtime , your blood chemistry, glucose and other vitals and deliver this data immediately to your clinician. Things will transform visits with medical professionals. <CLICK> We will see the growth of integrated wearables and smart fabric that integrate monitoring devices into clothing and footwear. <CLICK> We’re also seeing some other cool innovations such as smart pills and other diagnostic tools such as wearable ECG monitors you can take home from the hospital or doctors office and chronic or acute conditions can be monitored remotely. Traditional these sorts of conditions would have required admission or in-patient monitoring. The smart bedroom will displace the hospital. Most importantly, these devices will all integrate together to exchange information, in real-time, to produce much more meaningful results and also encouraging greater adoption. Lastly, the Healthcare of Things will also help by reminding us to take prescriptions, engage in therapies and make healthy choices so health parameters stay within acceptable, long-term boundaries. 62
  63. 63. © 2015 Citrix •  We also see the emergence of the Personally Controlled Electronic Health Record (PCEHR). Traditionally personal health records have been the place to put your fitness tracking information and other information you collect. This will change. The separate EMR/EHR records a clinician retains today will be replaced by a master record that you own and control. You will decide who has access to what information. •  Healthcare of things will feed into this health record and you can your clinicians will be able to monitor your health in realtime. You will be able to check on your health like you check on your stocks and your PCEHR will alert you and your clinician before you even know you are sick. •  Your health record will become smart, taping into the abundance of data and <CLICK> 63
  64. 64. © 2015 Citrix •  We also see the emergence of the Personally Controlled Electronic Health Record (PCEHR). Traditionally personal health records have been the place to put your fitness tracking information and other information you collect. This will change. The separate EMR/EHR records a clinician retains today will be replaced by a master record that you own and control. You will decide who has access to what information. •  Healthcare of things will feed into this health record and you can your clinicians will be able to monitor your health in realtime. You will be able to check on your health like you check on your stocks and your PCEHR will alert you and your clinician before you even know you are sick. •  Your health record will become smart, taping into the abundance of data and <CLICK> 64
  65. 65. © 2015 Citrix … taking advantage of the new age of Health Data Analytics. Whilst we will have all this data available, the challenge is turning this data into knowledge and actions across the care continuum. Physicians and nursing staff are already over burdened. They do not have time to look through more data and are instead asking for alerts that identify people who require assistance or intervention along with suggested actions and decision support that augment their own knowledge and thinking. Furthermore the analytics need to fit into the right ecosystem/workflow. The key is to understand how people think and apply machine learning in a way that emulates the way a human would deal with that data. This is at the core of decision support which in itself is not entirely new but up until now has been applied typically to advanced use cases like medical image diagnosis. In the future advancements in machine learning will mean that the cost is reduced to a point where decision support is used across a much broader range of medical diagnosis, leveraging anonymized data from an entire population to provide personalised diagnosis and treatment that is more accurate and delivered much quicker to have a greater impact on the patient. Just as we have mobile app stores for our smartphones, in the future we could see app 65
  66. 66. © 2015 Citrix … taking advantage of the new age of Health Data Analytics. Whilst we will have all this data available, the challenge is turning this data into knowledge and actions across the care continuum. Physicians and nursing staff are already over burdened. They do not have time to look through more data and are instead asking for alerts that identify people who require assistance or intervention along with suggested actions and decision support that augment their own knowledge and thinking. Furthermore the analytics need to fit into the right ecosystem/workflow. The key is to understand how people think and apply machine learning in a way that emulates the way a human would deal with that data. This is at the core of decision support which in itself is not entirely new but up until now has been applied typically to advanced use cases like medical image diagnosis. In the future advancements in machine learning will mean that the cost is reduced to a point where decision support is used across a much broader range of medical diagnosis, leveraging anonymized data from an entire population to provide personalised diagnosis and treatment that is more accurate and delivered much quicker to have a greater impact on the patient. Just as we have mobile app stores for our smartphones, in the future we could see app 66
  67. 67. …but one thing that is really going to have a huge impact on healthcare is the your personal genome. 10 years ago, the project the sequence the first genome cost over $3 billion. Today, advancements in technology enable mean people can get there genome sequenced for ~$1000, well exceeding the classic Moores Law. As things mature, the cost of genome sequencing will continue to plummet and be available to everyone. <click> This will allow your genome to be captured at birth and integrated into your PCEHR. Clinicians and computers will now be able to predict your health from your genetic make-up, understanding disease susceptibilities and potential life problems before they appear and personalizing treatments by predicting how you will respond to particular treatment regimes. This is powerful and it’s coming. 67 © 2015 Citrix
  68. 68. …but one thing that is really going to have a huge impact on healthcare is the your personal genome. 10 years ago, the project the sequence the first genome cost over $3 billion. Today, advancements in technology enable mean people can get there genome sequenced for ~$1000, well exceeding the classic Moores Law. As things mature, the cost of genome sequencing will continue to plummet and be available to everyone. <click> This will allow your genome to be captured at birth and integrated into your PCEHR. Clinicians and computers will now be able to predict your health from your genetic make-up, understanding disease susceptibilities and potential life problems before they appear and personalizing treatments by predicting how you will respond to particular treatment regimes. This is powerful and it’s coming. 68 © 2015 Citrix
  69. 69. …but one thing that is really going to have a huge impact on healthcare is the your personal genome. 10 years ago, the project the sequence the first genome cost over $3 billion. Today, advancements in technology enable mean people can get there genome sequenced for ~$1000, well exceeding the classic Moores Law. As things mature, the cost of genome sequencing will continue to plummet and be available to everyone. <click> This will allow your genome to be captured at birth and integrated into your PCEHR. Clinicians and computers will now be able to predict your health from your genetic make-up, understanding disease susceptibilities and potential life problems before they appear and personalizing treatments by predicting how you will respond to particular treatment regimes. This is powerful and it’s coming. 69 © 2015 Citrix
  70. 70. © 2015 Citrix In Citrix Labs we are doing some experiments with healthcare of things that might surprise you. These experiments are available for you to look more closely at the Citrix Technology Office booth, which can be found inside the Citrix Pavilion on the show floor. From a technology perspective we believe that there will be some amazing advancements in healthcare at the intersection of devices, data and analytics. To help us understand and make progress here we are experimenting with data collection, aggregation and the application of machine learning. Our experiments collect and aggregate data from wearable and connected health devices to help improve personal health outcomes. We have the Live Well app which targets improving employee wellness by monitoring and analysing biometric, stress and activity factors to provide the user with a continuous stream of suggestions to help them feel and perform better. Mobile care is our latest experiment in the world of remote care and telemedicine. Here we aggregate data within an aged care setting to improve the quality and timeliness of care by allowing clinicians to better connect with residents. 70
  71. 71. © 2015 Citrix In Citrix Labs we are doing some experiments with healthcare of things that might surprise you. These experiments are available for you to look more closely at the Citrix Technology Office booth, which can be found inside the Citrix Pavilion on the show floor. From a technology perspective we believe that there will be some amazing advancements in healthcare at the intersection of devices, data and analytics. To help us understand and make progress here we are experimenting with data collection, aggregation and the application of machine learning. Our experiments collect and aggregate data from wearable and connected health devices to help improve personal health outcomes. We have the Live Well app which targets improving employee wellness by monitoring and analysing biometric, stress and activity factors to provide the user with a continuous stream of suggestions to help them feel and perform better. Mobile care is our latest experiment in the world of remote care and telemedicine. Here we aggregate data within an aged care setting to improve the quality and timeliness of care by allowing clinicians to better connect with residents. 71
  72. 72. © 2015 Citrix In Citrix Labs we are doing some experiments with healthcare of things that might surprise you. These experiments are available for you to look more closely at the Citrix Technology Office booth, which can be found inside the Citrix Pavilion on the show floor. From a technology perspective we believe that there will be some amazing advancements in healthcare at the intersection of devices, data and analytics. To help us understand and make progress here we are experimenting with data collection, aggregation and the application of machine learning. Our experiments collect and aggregate data from wearable and connected health devices to help improve personal health outcomes. We have the Live Well app which targets improving employee wellness by monitoring and analysing biometric, stress and activity factors to provide the user with a continuous stream of suggestions to help them feel and perform better. Mobile care is our latest experiment in the world of remote care and telemedicine. Here we aggregate data within an aged care setting to improve the quality and timeliness of care by allowing clinicians to better connect with residents. 72
  73. 73. © 2015 Citrix In conclusion, technology is going to dramatically change the way we do medicine. It’s not going to happen overnight. The medical industry has generally been the last area to adopt new tech, but that is changing and we are about to embark on a whole new era of medicine. …and now I would like to hand back over to Martin who is going to close our journey into the technology landscape… •  More interesting Tech Trends can be found here: – http://www.forbes.com/sites/robertszczerba/2014/11/23/tech-trends-shaping-the-future- of-medicine-part-1/ – http://www.forbes.com/sites/robertszczerba/2014/11/23/tech-trends-shaping-the-future- of-medicine-part-2/ 73
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  75. 75. Thank you Matt, Let me recap… Actually this slide which is a picture of the self driving car that Mercedes demonstrated at CES this year actually embodies many of the trends we just talk through, ubiquitous connectivity, new display technology, robotics, electric vehicles, it is sort of the penultimate embodiment of what we have been talking about today…. 75 © 2015 Citrix
  76. 76. © 2015 Citrix So let’s reflect the three things we discussed today: upcoming trends, work transformed, and the healthcare of things. This slide is a great cheat sheet capturing the main points from each of these sections. Now at Citrix we are actually working with some teams in two of these areas 76
  77. 77. © 2015 Citrix <ANIMATION> How are we skating to the puck? The Citrix Technology Office has a number of working groups focused on Horizon 3 disruptive activities around the internet of things and Healthcare. I like to invite you to take a look at some of our experiments around healthcare and IoT at the Citrix Technology Office booth in the innovation area of the Citrix stand. These groups operate like startups rapidly innovating with customers to build value. We can’t wait to show you what we come up with. We would love to hear your feedback… 77
  78. 78. © 2015 Citrix Finally, I would like to thank you for coming to our session today hope you enjoyed the content and I would like to invite you to download the full technology landscape 2020 document at cto.citrix.com. Thank you once again and enjoy the rest of Synergy 78
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