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Choosing Open (webinar)

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Webinar for 'Digital Learning Environments, Networks, Communities' Virtual Symposium (LRNT521), Royal Roads University, Victoria, BC - 20th April 2017

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Choosing Open (webinar)

  1. 1. pen Choosing Image: CC0 by Nadine Shaabana Catherine Cronin  CELT, NUI Galway Virtual Symposium, LRNT521, Royal Roads University  20th April 2017
  2. 2. Catherine Cronin @catherinecronin  catherinecronin.net CELT, National University of Ireland, Galway
  3. 3. Image: CC0 Stijn Swinnen It has never been more risky to operate in the open. It has never been more vital to operate in the open. Martin Weller (2016)
  4. 4. sharing a story from Ireland, 2015…
  5. 5. @joecaslin  joecaslin.com
  6. 6. @hendinarts
  7. 7. @joecaslin  joecaslin.com
  8. 8. #marref
  9. 9. #marref
  10. 10. #hometovote
  11. 11. #RRUMALAT #MALATmemes #OxfordComma #OER17 #TowardsOpenness
  12. 12. Participatory Culture: low barriers to artistic expression & civic engagement strong support for creating & sharing informal mentorship members believe their contributions matter social connection Jenkins, et al. (2007) Jenkins, Ito & boyd (2016)
  13. 13. multimodal multimedia ✓ voice / choice networked ✓ topic / content social ✓ genre / tone purposeful ✓ space / place collaborative ✓ time / duration agentic Participatory Culture literacy practices
  14. 14. networked educators networked students Physical Spaces Bounded Online Spaces Open Online Spaces Image: CC BY-SA 2.0 Catherine Cronin, built on Networked Teacher image CC BY-NC-SA 2.0 Alec Couros formal education
  15. 15. Openness and praxis: Exploring the use of open educational practices (OEP) in higher education my PhD research
  16. 16. OEP (Open Educational Practices) OER (Open Educational Resources) Free Open Admission (e.g. Open Universities) INTERPRETATIONS of ‘OPEN’ OER-focused definitions produce, use, reuse OER + Broader definitions… Licensed for reuse for use, adaptation & redistribution by others Image: CC BY-SA 2.0 Marcel Oosterwijk
  17. 17. • Open educational practices (OEP) (Beetham, et al., 2012; Ehlers, 2011; Geser, 2007) • Open teaching (Couros, 2010; Couros & Hildebrandt, 2016) • Open pedagogy (DeRosa & Robison, 2015; Hegarty, 2015; Weller, 2014) • Critical (digital) pedagogy (Farrow, 2016; Rosen & Smale, 2015; Stommel, 2014) • Open scholarship (Veletsianos & Kimmons, 2012b; Weller, 2011) • Networked participatory scholarship (Veletsianos & Kimmons, 2012a; Stewart, 2015) OEP and related concepts
  18. 18. collaborative practices that include the creation, use and reuse of OER and pedagogical practices employing participatory technologies and social networks for interaction, peer-learning, knowledge creation and sharing, and empowerment of learners. Open Educational Practices (OEP) working definition
  19. 19. INTERPRETATIONS of ‘OPEN’ Policy/ Culture Values Practices Activities LEVELS of OPENNESS OEP (Open Educational Practices) OER (Open Educational Resources) Free Open Admission (e.g. Open Universities) IndividualInstitutional Image: CC BY-SA 2.0 Marcel Oosterwijk
  20. 20. Not using OEP for teaching Using OEP for teaching DIGITAL NETWORKING PRACTICES Main digital identity is institution-based Not using social media (or personal use only) Combine institutional & open identities Using social media personal/prof (but not for teaching) Well-developed open digital identity Using social media for personal/professional (including teaching) DIGITAL TEACHING PRACTICES Using LMS only Using free resources, little knowledge of C or CC Using LMS + open tools Using & reusing OER PERSONAL VALUES Strong attachment to personal privacy Strict boundaries (P/P & S/T) Valuing privacy & openness; balance Accepting porosity across boundaries increasing openness
  21. 21. Image: CC0 photo by Saksham Gangwar
  22. 22. An important question becomes not simply whether education is more or less open, but what forms of openness are worthwhile and for whom; openness alone is not an educational virtue. Edwards (2015) “ Critical approach to openness Additional references: Bayne, Knox & Ross (2015) Cottom (2015) Czerniewicz (2015) Gourlay (2015) Selwyn & Facer (2013) singh (2015) Watters (2014)
  23. 23. Balancing privacy and openness Developing digital literacies Valuing social learning Challenging traditional teaching role expectations inner circle (2 dimensions) Networked Individuals both circles (4 dimensions) Networked Educators 4 dimensions shared by educators using OEP for teaching
  24. 24. Balancing privacy & openness Image: CC BY 2.0 woodleywonderworks
  25. 25. Balancing privacy and openness will I share openly? who will I share with? (context collapse) who will I share as? (digital identity) will I share this? MACRO MESO MICRO NANO
  26. 26. Practicing openness is:  complex  personal  contextual  continuously negotiated
  27. 27. We must rebuild institutions that value humans’ minds and lives and integrity and safety. Audrey Watters (2017) “ Image: CC BY-NC 2.0 carnagenyc
  28. 28. Le spectre de la rose Jerome Robbins Dance Division, NYPL To hope is to give yourself to the future, and that commitment to the future makes the present inhabitable. Rebecca Solnit (2004) Hope in the Dark “
  29. 29. Le spectre de la rose Jerome Robbins Dance Division, NYPL Thank You! Catherine Cronin @catherinecronin catherinecronin.net
  30. 30. How do our own choices re: openness affect learning, teaching, policy, and culture?
  31. 31. During the discussion following the presentation, the issue of risk arose again (as highlighted in the Martin Weller quote shared at the start). A growing body of research in open education advocates and uses a critical approach to openness – acknowledging, for example, that open practices can bias those already privileged. Additional ‘critical approach’ resources are shared on the following slide and also in the full list of resources for the webinar.
  32. 32. An important question becomes not simply whether education is more or less open, but what forms of openness are worthwhile and for whom; openness alone is not an educational virtue. Edwards (2015) “ Critical approach to openness Additional references: Bayne, Knox & Ross (2015) Cottom (2015) Czerniewicz (2015) Gourlay (2015) Selwyn & Facer (2013) singh (2015) Watters (2014)
  33. 33. Links to all presentation references: http://bit.ly/ChoosingOpen
  34. 34. Bayne, S., Knox, J. & Ross, J. (2015). Open education: the need for a critical approach. Learning, Media and Technology, 40(3), 247-250. Beetham, H., Falconer, I., McGill, L. & Littlejohn, A. (2012). Open Practices: Briefing Paper. Jisc. Cottom, T. (2015). Open and accessible to what and for whom? tressiemc blog. Couros, A. (2010). Developing personal learning networks for open and social learning. In G. Veletsianos (Ed.), Emerging Technologies in Distance Education. Athabasca University Press. Couros, A. & Hildebrandt, K. (2016). Designing for open and social learning. In G. Veletsianos, Emergence and Innovation in Digital Learning. Athabasca University Press. Czerniewicz, L. (2015). Confronting inequitable power dynamics of global knowledge production and exchange. Water Wheel 14(5), 26-28. DeRosa, R. & Robison, S. (2015, November 9). Pedagogy, technology, and the example of open educational resources. EDUCAUSE Review. Edwards, R. (2015). Knowledge infrastructures and the inscrutability of openness in education. Learning, Media and Technology, 40(3), 251-264. Ehlers, U-D. (2011). Extending the territory: From open educational resources to open educational practices. Journal of Open, Flexible and Distance Learning, 15(2), 1–10. Farrow, R. (2016). Open education and critical pedagogy. Learning, Media and Technology. Geser, G. (2007). Open educational practices and resources: OLCOS Roadmap, 2012. Gourlay, L. (2015). Open education as a “heterotopia of desire.” Learning, Media and Technology, 40(3), 310- 327. Hegarty, B. (2015). Attributes of open pedagogy: A model for using open educational resources. Educational Technology. (July/August). References (1 of 2)
  35. 35. Jenkins, H., et al. (2007). Confronting the Challenges of Participatory Culture: Media Education for the 21st Century. Chicago: MacArthur Foundation. Jenkins, H., Ito, M. & boyd, d. (2016) Participatory Culture in a Networked Era. Cambridge: Polity Press. Rosen, J. R. & Smale, M. A. (2015). Open digital pedagogy = Critical pedagogy. Hybrid Pedagogy. Selwyn, N. & Facer, K. (2013). The politics of education and technology: Conflicts, controversies, and connections. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan. singh, s. (2015) The Fallacy of “Open”. savasavasava blog. Solnit, R. (2004). Hope in the Dark: Untold Histories, Wild Possibilities. New York: Nation Books. Stewart, B. (2015). In abundance: Networked participatory practices as scholarship. IRRODL, 16(3). Stommel, J. (2014, November 18). Critical digital pedagogy: a definition. Hybrid Pedagogy. Veletsianos, G. & Kimmons, R. (2012a). Assumptions and challenges of open scholarship. IRRODL, 13(4), 166-189. Veletsianos, G. & Kimmons, R. (2012b). Networked participatory scholarship: Emergent techno-cultural pressures toward open and digital scholarship in online networks. Computers & Education, 58(2), 766–774. Watters, A. (2014). From “open” to justice. Hack Education blog. Watters, A. (2017, February 2). Ed-tech in a time of Trump. Hack Education blog. Weller, M. (2011). The Digital Scholar: How technology is transforming scholarly practice. Basingstoke: Bloomsbury Academic. Weller, M. (2014). The Battle for Open: How openness won and why it doesn’t feel like victory. London: Ubiquity Press. Weller, M. (2016, December 13). The paradoxes of open scholarship. The Ed Techie. References (2 of 2)

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